Most Promoters Promote And So Do Some Detractors

We recently published a benchmark of Net Promoter Scores of 180 companies across 19 industries. Within that research, we showed that promoters are more likely than detractors to repurchase. In a separate analysis, we examined the actual number of times that people recommended companies and compared that to the NPS rating they gave those companies. As you can see in the graphic below:

  • Promoters are more likely to recommend. Promoters are much more likely than detractors to recommend a company across all industries.
  • Not all promoters recommend. The number of promoters that recommended a company ranges from 47% (parcel delivery services) to 80% (retailers).
  • Some detractors recommend. The number of detractors that recommended a company ranges from 13% for banks to 39% of retailers.

What doesn’t show-up in this graphic is the intensity of recommendations. Our detailed analysis examined the frequency of recommendations across all of these industries. Promoters are an average of 3.4x more likely than detractors to recommend companies to three or more friends (ranging from 2.1x more likely for major appliances to 5.7x more likely for banks).

Bottom line: NPS is a good, but not perfect indication of actual recommendations

Obama and Romney Promoters By Income and Employment

In my previous two posts, I examined the Net Promoter Scores (NPS) for President Obama and Mitt Romney and the issues that their Promoters care about.

In this post, I examine the percentage of U.S. consumers that are Promoters (likely to recommend the candidate to their friends or relatives) of the candidates based on their annual income levels and their current employment status. As you can see in the infographic below:

  • Obama has the largest advantage with consumers making less than $25,000 per year and the smallest lead with consumers making between $75,000 and $100,000 per year
  • Romney’s support increases with income level
  • Both of the candidates have their strongest support from high-income consumers
  • Obama has the largest advantage with students and the smallest lead with unemployed consumers

The bottom line: Obama’s strongest base are low income consumers and students

Issues That Separate Obama and Romney Promoters

In my previous post, I examined the Net Promoter Scores (NPS) for President Obama and Mitt Romney. The research, which is based on a survey of 5,000 U.S. consumers in August, showed that Obama scored higher than Romney. Both candidates, however, have very low NPS (-57% for Romney and -33% for Obama).

In this post, I’m examining the issues that U.S. citizens care about, honing in on the differences between Obama and Romney promoters (consumers that are likely to recommend the candidate to their friends or relatives). We asked consumers about 11 different issues. As you can see in the infographic below:

  • The most important issue for both Obama and Romney promoters is improving the U.S. economy and the bottom issue is the candidates’ religious views.
  • Romney promoters view eight of the 11 issues as being more important than do Obama promoters; the only exceptions are the candidate’s positions on healthcare, gay marriage and abortion rights.
  • The three issues that Romney promoters are more likely to see as important than Obama promoters are their position on U.S. relations with Israel (+26), their position on international terrorism (+16), and their religious views (+9).
  • More consumers prefer Obama’s position across all of the issues, which is not surprising considering that Obama has a larger number of promoters.
  • Consumers show the largest preference for Obama’s vision for the future of the U.S. and his position on healthcare (42%).
  • Consumers show the largest preference for Romney for his plans to improve the U.S. economy (33%) and his position on healthcare (32%).
  • U.S. consumers have the least preference when it comes to the candidates’ religious views.
  • Obama supporters show more preference for Obama’s views than Romney’s promoters do for his views in 10 of the 11 issues; the only exception is their position on U.S. relations with Israel.
  • Obama promoters show the largest preference gap when it comes to the candidates’ positions on abortion rights (+12) and gay rights (+10).

The bottom line: Consumers really care about the economy and a vision for the future

Net Promoter Score and Market Share For 60 Tech Vendors

Temkin Group recently surveyed 800 IT professionals from large companies and asked them a series of questions about tech vendors. This research has fueled some of our previous posts: Temkin Experience Ratings for Tech Vendors, How IT Professionals Share Feedback About Vendors, and Tech Vendors: Benchmarking Product and Relationship Satisfaction of IT Clients.

We also asked the IT professionals to rate each tech vendor on the Net Promoter Score (NPS) scale.* NPS is based on one question: How likely are you to recommend the tech vendor to a friend or colleague? IT professionals choose an answer on a scale from 0 (not at all likely) to 10 (extremely likely). Responses are put into one of three categories:

  • Promoters (score 9 or 10)
  • Passives (score 7 or 8)
  • Detractors (score 0 to 6)

NPS is calculated as the percentage of promoters minus the percentage of detractors. (If you’re interested in best practices for using NPS, read my post 9 Recommendations for NPS which is also part of our VoC resource page).

Here is the NPS for 60 tech vendors, ranging from Intel, Microsoft and Cisco in the 50s down to Compuware, Unisys, Cognizant, and Capgemini below 10.

We also asked the IT professionals how much their company was planning to spend in 2012 compared with 2011 and mapped this data with NPS. It turns out that we found four bands of performance in this market based on NPS scores:

  • More than 40: These companies have much higher purchase momentum and are poised to grab a lot of market share
  • Between 28 and 40: These companies have above average purchase momentum and are poised to gain market share
  • Between 23 and 28: These companies have below average purchase momentum and are poised to lose market share
  • Less than 23: These companies have much lower purchase momentum and are poised to give up a lot of market share

You can purchase the data in an excel spreadsheet for $195. The file includes details on the 60 tech vendors shown in this blog post as well as 28 other tech vendors with sample sizes too small to be included in our published research. The data includes sample sizes for the companies, percentages for promoters, detractors, and NPS score, as well as the percentage of companies with increasing spending plans and those with decreasing spending plans.

*Note: Net Promoter, NPS, and Net Promoter Score are trademarks of Satmetrix Systems, Bain & Company, and Fred Reichheld

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