Report: Economics of Net Promoter Score, 2017

We just published a Temkin Group report, Economics of Net Promoter Score, 2017. Here’s the executive summary:

Net Promoter® Score (NPS®) is a popular metric that companies use to analyze their customer experience efforts. But how does this metric actually relate to loyalty? To uncover the relationship between NPS and loyalty, we asked 10,000 U.S. consumers to give an NPS to 331 companies across 20 industries, and we then looked at how this score correlated with four key loyalty behaviors. Here are some highlights from this research:

  • Compared to detractors, promoters are over four times more likely to repurchase from a company, over five times more likely to forgive a company if it makes a mistake, over seven times more likely to try new offerings from a company, and almost five times more likely to trust a company.
  • We performed a detailed analysis of the loyalty data for promoters, passives, and detractors across 20 different industries: airlines, auto dealers, banks, computer and tablet makers, credit card issuers, fast food chains, health plans, hotels and rooms, insurance carriers, investment firms, parcel delivery services, rental car and transport agencies, retailers, software firms, streaming media services, supermarkets, TV and Internet service providers, TVs and appliance makers, utilities, and wireless carriers.
  • Ultimately, if a company wants to benefit from using NPS as a key metric, it must focus on improving customer experience, not obsessing over the metric itself.

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Note: To see NPS for individual companies and industries, download the report, Net Promoter Benchmark Study, 2016.

These two graphics from the report show the average connection between NPS and loyalty across all 20 industries, while the report also contains data for each of the 20 industries:

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Report Outline:

  • Promoters are More Loyal than Passives or Detractors
  • Loyalty of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across 20 Industries
    • NPS Loyalty Details for 20 Industries
  • Focus on Customer Experience, Not A Metric

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. NPS Correlates to Future Purchase Intentions
  2. Value of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across Industries
  3. Value of Promoters Versus Detractors
  4. Likelihood of Repurchasing of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across Industries
  5. Likelihood of Trying New Offerings of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across Industries
  6. Likelihood of Forgiving of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across Industries
  7. Likelihood of Trusting of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across Industries
  8. Better Customer Experience Correlates to Higher NPS
  9. Value of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across Industries
  10. The Four Customer Experience Core Competencies

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While this report provides clear evidence that promoters are more valuable than detractors, it is not an endorsement of NPS as a metric. The data shows that companies should be able to increase their customer loyalty if they create promoters and cut down on detractors. As you will see on our VoC/NPS Program Resources, the processes for improving is more important than the specific metric being used.

Report: The State of CX Management, 2017

The state of customer experience management reportWe just published a Temkin Group report, The State of CX Management, 2017.

For the eighth straight year, Temkin Group has evaluated the state of Customer Experience (CX) management at large companies. It includes a lot of details about customer experience within large organizations and examines their effectiveness across Temkin Group’s Four CX Core Competencies: Purposeful Leadership, Compelling Brand Values, Employee Engagement, and Customer Connectedness.

When we analyzed their efforts and their progress this year, we found that:

  • While only 8% of companies view themselves as industry leaders in CX today, 55% aspire to be leaders within three years.
  • A majority of companies have a CX executive in charge of their efforts and a central team who coordinates significant CX activities. The median number of CX staff members falls between 11 and 15 full-time professionals.
  • Companies find significant value in working with voice of the customer vendors, and the percentage of companies who get value out of this relationship has been steadily increasing.
  • We used Temkin Group’s CX Competency and Maturity Assessment, which evaluates four CX competencies­ (Purposeful Leadership, Compelling Brand Values, Employee Engagement, and Customer Connectedness) to benchmark the maturity of companies’ CX efforts and found that only 10% of companies have reached the highest two levels of customer experience, while 59% still find themselves in the lowest two stages.
  • When we compared CX leaders with CX laggards, we discovered that the leaders enjoy stronger financial results, are more likely to have senior executives leading company-wide CX efforts, employ more full-time CX employees, use more experience design agencies, and feel more supported by senior leaders.
  • This report also includes an assessment that companies can use to benchmark their CX efforts and capabilities.

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Here are the results from Temkin Group’s CX Competency & Maturity Assessment:

results from customer experience competency and maturity assessment

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Report Outline:

  • Customer Experience Management Within Large Firms
  • Assessing The Four Customer Experience Core Competencies
  • Comparing CX Leaders and CX Laggards
  • Assess and Improve Your CX Competencies

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Customer Experience Today and Future Ambitions
  2. Customer Experience Leadership and Coordination
  3. Customer Experience Coordination and Staffing
  4. Customer Experience Team Effectiveness
  5. Customer Experience Tools and Services
  6. Customer Experience Tools and Services (2015 to 2017)
  7. Quality of Customer Experience Across Different Channels
  8. Quality of Customer Experience Across Different Channels (2015 to 2017)
  9. Obstacles to Customer Experience Success
  10. The Four Customer Experience Core Competencies
  11. Temkin Group Customer Experience Competency Assessment
  12. Results From Temkin Group’s Customer Experience Competency and Maturity Assessment
  13. Customer Experience Maturity and Competency Based on CX Executive Leadership
  14. Results From Temkin Group’s Customer Experience Competency and Maturity Assessment(2010 to 2017)
  15. Most Frequently Practiced Customer Experience Competency Attributes
  16. Least Frequently Practiced Customer Experience Competency Attributes
  17. Customer Experience Competency Attributes that Improved and Declined Between 2016 to 2017
  18. Overview: CX Competency Leaders Versus CX Competency Laggards
  19. Effectiveness of CX Teams, CX Leaders Versus CX Laggards
  20. Use of CX Tools and Services, CX Leaders Versus CX Laggards
  21. Effectiveness of CX Tools and Services, CX Leaders Versus CX Laggards
  22. Quality of Customer Experience Across Different Channels, CX Leaders Versus CX Laggards
  23. Obstacles to CX Success, CX Leaders Versus CX Laggards
  24. Executive Priorities, CX Leaders Versus CX Laggards
  25. Percentiles of Results From Temkin Group’s CX Competency and Maturity Assessment

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Report: Tech Vendors: Product and Relationship Satisfaction, 2017

1701_ds_techproductsandrelationships_coverWe just published a Temkin Group data snapshot, Tech Vendors: Product and Relationship Satisfaction of IT Clients, 2017.

During Q3 of 2016, we surveyed 800 IT decision-makers from companies with at least $250 million in annual revenues, asking them to rate both the products of and their relationships with 62 different tech vendors. HPE outsourcing, Google, and IBM SPSS earned the top overall scores, while Trend Micro, Infosys, and SunGard received the lowest overall scores. To determine their product rating, we evaluated tech vendors across four product/service criteria: features, quality, flexibility, and ease of use. And we calculated their relationship rating using four different criteria: technical support, support of the account team, cost of ownership, and innovation of company. We also looked at how the average product and relationship scores of tech vendors have changed over the previous three years.

This research has a report (.pdf) and a dataset (excel). The dataset has the details of Product/Service and Relationship satisfaction for the 62 tech vendors as well as for several tech vendors with sample sizes too small to be included in the published report.

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Here’s a link to last year’s study.

The research examines eight areas of satisfaction; four that deal with products & services and four that examine relationships. Tech vendors earned the highest average satisfaction level for product features (64%) and the lowest for total cost of ownership (57%).

As you can see in the chart below, the overall product/service & relationship satisfaction ranges from a high of 76% for HPE outsourcing down to a low of 42% for Trend Micro.

1701_techproductrelationshipoverallresults

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Report: Capturing Insights from Online Customer Communities

1612_communityinsights_coverWe published a Temkin Group report, Capturing Insights from Online Customer Communities. Here’s the executive summary:

Companies across a range of industries use online customer communities to augment their customer support, marketing, and product innovation efforts. However, when used thoughtfully, these online communities can provide value far beyond their original purpose. Because these communities signify an ongoing relationship between the company and participating customers, customer insights teams will find that these forums contain a treasure trove of insights. As a result of these deeper relationships, online communities offer unique advantages to voice of the customer (VoC) programs, including Always-on Feedback, Broad and Diverse Insights, Continuous Dialogue, Peer-to-Peer Dynamics, and Employee-to-Community Interactivity. These unique advantages can help companies adapt to the five Customer Insight Trends that are changing the face of VoC programs: 1) Deep empathy, not stacks of metrics, 2) Continuous insights, not periodic studies, 3) Customer journeys, not isolated interactions, 4) Useful prescriptions, not past descriptions, and 5) Enterprise intelligence, not customer feedback. To help organizations get the most value from their communities, Temkin Group has highlighted best practices for capturing and using insights from customer communities across these five trends. Companies also must plan for the entire community lifecycle to be successful; this includes Determine Strategy, Structure Community, Recruit Members, Grow and Maintain, and Close Down.

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Online customer communities have some unique attributes that make them a valuable component to voice of the customer programs (one of the 12 figures in the report):

1612_attributesofonlinecommmunities

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Report: Emotion-Infused Experience Design

1606_EmotionInfusedExperienceDesign_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, Emotion-Infused Experience Design.

Emotions play an essential role in how people make decisions. Consequently, how a customer feels about their experience with a company has the most significant impact on their loyalty to that company. And yet despite their importance, both customers and companies agree that organizations do a poor job of engaging customers’ emotions. To help companies create a stronger emotional connection with customers, we’ve developed an approach called Emotion-Infused Experience Design (EIxD). To master EIxD, organizations must continuously focus on three questions: “Who exactly are these people (who happen to be our customers)?” “What is our organizational personality?” and “How do we want customers to feel?” This report offers both advice and examples about how to apply these three questions across four facets that affect emotion: senses, feelings, social, and values. And to help infuse these practices across the organization, we have also identified some strategies for how to turn employees into agents of EIxD.

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Our research shows that emotion is often a missing link in customer experience. While emotions may seem ephemeral and subjective, we developed a concrete methodology you can use to design for emotion. We call this methodology “Emotion-Infused Experience Design” (EIxD), and we define it as:

An approach for deliberately creating interactions that evoke specific customer emotions.

To master EIxD, you must ask (and answer) three questions throughout the entire design process:

  1. Who exactly are these people (who happen to be our customers)? You cannot design emotionally engaging experiences without a solid grasp on who your target customers are—what they want, what they need, what makes them tick.
  2. What is our organizational personality? Research shows that people relate to companies as if they are fellow human beings rather than inanimate corporate entities.
  3. How do we want our customers to feel? People are inherently emotional beings, and every interaction they have with you will make them feel a certain way—whether you intend it to or not.

To address the three questions of EIxD, this report shows how to design around four elements of emotion: senses, feelings, social, and values. Here are two of the 26 figures in the report:

1606_TwoPartsofEmotion1605_CokeStarbucksEmotions

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Report: Customer-Infused Process Improvement

1604_CustomerInfusedProcessImprovement_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, Customer-Infused Process Improvement, which provides five strategies for instilling customers’ needs into process improvement methodologies. Here’s the executive summary:

Process improvement and customer experience have traditionally served different roles in a company. However, these two disciplines are starting to intersect as customer experience looks to process improvement to operationalize key customer interactions and process improvement needs customer experience to provide customer-focused insights and continually monitor new processes. Temkin Group proposes that companies bring these two approaches together into Customer-Infused Process Change. This report highlights five strategies critical to driving this new approach: Prioritize Improvements Across Customer Journeys, Embrace Deep Customer Empathy, Involve Customers in Solution Development, Innovate to Meet Latent Needs, and Measure Success with Customer-Focused Metrics. To make process improvement efforts more customer-centric, organizations need to infuse these strategies across all aspects of process improvement.

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It’s time for process improvement to become more focused on customers. Rather than abandoning existing process improvement methodologies, Temkin Group recommends bringing a customer orientation into your efforts. We call this approach Customer-Infused Process Change (CiPC), which we define as:

Driving improvements based on a deep understanding of customer needs.

The report provides best practices across five strategies of CiPC:

  1. Prioritize Improvements Across Customer Journeys: By understanding customer interactions in the context of their broader journeys, companies can invest in process improvements projects that have the most impact on the customer’s experience.
  2. Embrace Deep Customer Empathy: In order to effect sustainable changes, employees impacted by redesigned processes need to understand why these changes are important to customers.
  3. Involve Customers in Solution Development: Process improvement efforts must have resources available to ensure that ongoing, incremental changes can be made based on this customer input.
  4. Innovate to Meet Latent Needs: Customers can’t always articulate what they want; instead, they often describe a slightly improved version of what they already know.
  5. Measure Success with Customer-Focused Metrics: Companies can’t measure the success of process improvement efforts with internally focused, operational metrics.

1604_CustomerInfusedProcess5Strategies

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The bottom line: Process improvements need more customer insights.

Report: Tech Vendors: Product and Relationship Satisfaction, 2016

1601_DS_TechProductsAndRelationships_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group data snapshot, Tech Vendors: Product and Relationship Satisfaction of IT Clients, 2016.

During Q3, 2015, 800 IT professionals from companies with at least $250 million in annual revenues rated both the products of and their relationships with 62 tech vendors. The research examines satisfaction with eight areas: product/service features, product/service quality, product/service flexibility, product/service ease of use, technical support, support of the account team, cost of ownership, and innovation of company. Some of the findings include that Intel, Google, and HP outsourcing earned the highest overall satisfaction ratings, while Unisys, Sage, and Cognizant IT services earned the lowest. When it comes to product satisfaction, Intel leads in product features, Apple and IBM IT services lead in product quality, Google leads in product flexibility, and NetApp leads in product ease of use. When it comes to relationship satisfaction, HP outsourcing leads in tech support and in cost of ownership, Intel leads in account team support, and Google leads in innovation.

This product has a report (.pdf) and a dataset (excel). The dataset has the details of Product/Service and Relationship satisfaction for the 62 tech vendors as well as for several tech vendors with sample sizes too small to be included in the published report.

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As you can see in the chart below, the overall product/service & relationship satisfaction ranges from a high of 74% for Intel down to a low of 46% for Unisys.

1601_ProductRelationshipSatisfaction_Ratings

The chart below shows the average scores across all satisfaction criteria. Tech vendors scored the highest in innovation (64%) and the lowest in cost of ownership (56%).1601_ProductRelationshipSatisfaction_Elements

Report details: When you purchase this research, you will receive a written data snapshot and an excel spreadsheet with more data.The dataset has the details of Product/Service and Relationship satisfaction for the 62 tech vendors as well as for several tech vendors with sample sizes too small to be included in the published report. If you want to know more about the data file, download this SAMPLE SPREADSHEET without the data (.xls).

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Report: B2B Customer Experience Best Practices

1510_B2B CX Best Practices_COVERWe published a Temkin Group report, Business-to-Business (B2B) Customer Experience Best Practices. This report provides data on the state of customer experience (CX) in B2B as well as 20 CX best practices across five critical B2B processes. Here’s the executive summary:

Temkin Group research shows that although business-to-business (B2B) organizations are raising their customer experience (CX) ambitions, they still have a way to go before achieving their goals. Despite the fact that most large B2Bs have a low level of CX maturity, our research shows that 57% of them aspire to deliver industry-leading customer experience within three years. However, to improve their CX, B2Bs must master Temkin Group’s four customer experience core competencies: Purposeful Leadership, Compelling Brand Values, Employee Engagement, and Customer Connectedness. Our research uncovered 20 practices that B2Bs can emulate when applying those competencies across these five key business processes: sales and account management, implementation/project execution, support and issue resolution, partner alignment, and product management and innovation. To assess your organization’s CX maturity, use Temkin Group’s Customer Experience Competency Assessment and compare the results to data from other large B2B firms to chart your path to improvement.

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The report examines the state of B2B CX, including the results from large companies that completed Temkin Group’s CX Competency & Maturity Assessment:

1511_B2BCXMaturity

To help B2B organizations raise their CX maturity, we identify 20 best practices for mastering Temkin Group’s four customer experience core competencies: Purposeful Leadership, Compelling Brand Values, Employee Engagement, and Customer Connectedness. These practices are aligned with five key B2B activities: sales and account management, implementation/project execution, support and issue resolution, partner alignment, and product management and innovation:

1511_B2B5Processes

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eBook: 15 Tips for Engaging Employees

1510_15TipsToEngageEmployees_CoverIn honor of CX Day, Temkin Group is publishing a free eBook: 15 Tips for Engaging Employees. Here’s the executive summary: 

It is impossible for an organization to deliver a great customer experience without an engaged workforce. To help you engage your employees in your customer experience journey, we have compiled a list of 15 examples of how leading-edge companies are practicing what Temkin Group calls the “Five I’s of Employee Engagement”—Inform, Inspire, Instruct, Involve, and Incent—which you can modify and emulate at your own firm. 

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Report: The Secret to B2B2C Customer Experience Success

1412_B2B2CCX_COVERWe published a Temkin Group report, The Secret to B2B2C Customer Experience Success. When a company doesn’t have sole control over the customer relationship, it has to recognize the entire system of relationships that influence the end customer’s experience, focusing on what we call B2B2C CX management. Here’s the executive summary:

Many companies reach their end customers through a variety of channel partners—from independent agents and dealerships, to resellers and distributors. Temkin Group defines B2B2C customer experience as enhancing the end customer experience in a way that satisfies the needs of channel partners. The B2B2C environment is complex and full of challenges that hamper companies’ ability to deliver great customer experience to their end customers, such as a lack of alignment with partners or a limited understanding of customers. Our research uncovered five B2B2C CX capabilities that companies require to succeed in delivering a great experience to end customers: Voice of the Partner, Customer Insights Cooperation, CX Capabilities Development, Partner Engagement, and Channel Management Collaboration. We also identified three prototypical B2B2C structures that impact how companies should apply the B2B2C CX capabilities for the most effective outcome. Use Temkin Group’s assessment to identify your company’s B2B2C structure.

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Here’s an overview of the five B2B2C CX capabilities:

B2B2CCXCapabilities

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The bottom line: Engage your partners to engage your customers.

Free eBook: People-Centric Experience Design

PCxD_eBook_COVERA few months ago, I introduced a new concept called People-Centric Experience Design™ (PCxD™), which is defined as

Fostering an environment that creates positive, memorable human encounters

Since we believe that the concept can significantly help organizations deliver better customer experience, we’ve decided to publish the concept in a free eBook.

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Experiences are all about people, the customers who interact with your organization and the employees who shape those interactions. Most approaches to customer experience, from voice of the customer programs to customer journey mapping, deal with the logical, left-brain elements of customer experience. But they often fall short on the right-brain, emotional side. That’s where PCxD comes into play.

To achieve PCxD, companies must master three principles:

  1. Align through Purpose. Just about every large organization has vision and mission statements floating around their hallways. But when it comes to making decisions on a day-to-day basis, these documents are nowhere to be found. They play NO ROLE in how the company is actually run. However, customer experience leaders operate differently. Rather than making empty promises, they create and sustain a clear sense of purpose that inspires loyalty from customers and alignment from employees.
  2. Guide with Empathy. People have a natural capacity for empathy. Unfortunately, companies often bring out people’s more selfish tendencies and suppress their empathetic ones by playing into their personal biases and arranging the organizational structure to reward self-centered behavior. For instance, while a typical customer interaction cuts across many functional groups (a single purchase, for instance, may include contact with decisions by product management, sales, marketing, accounts payable, and legal organizations), companies push employees to stay focused solely on their own functional areas. This myopic view is often reinforced by incentives focused on narrow domains, which creates a chasm between empathy and personal success. Companies must elicit human empathy, not selfishness, by sharing a deeper understanding of customers and their needs.
  3. Design for Memories. When it comes to loyalty, customer experience isn’t very important. That’s right, customer experience is not very important. What is important? Memories. People make decisions based on how they remember experiences, not on how they actually experienced them. This distinction is important because people don’t remember experiences the way they actually occur. Rather, people construct memories as stories in their mind based on the fragments of their actual experiences. An improved understanding of how people truly remember things can help you focus on improving the most important moments.

PCxD

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The bottom line: Tap into the power of purpose, empathy, and memories.

What Do Customers Want? Professor Kano Knows

I’m guessing that many of you weren’t sure what this post would be about given the title. That’s because most people have never heard of Professor Noriaki Kano. But anyone who deals with customer experience (or product development) should definitely learn about his work. Professor Kano is probably best known for creating the Kano Model (developed in the 1980’s) that classifies customer preferences into five categories:

  1. Attractive (unexpected value)
  2. One-Dimensional (the more, the better)
  3. Must-Be (need to have these)
  4. Indifferent (no impact)
  5. Reverse (negative impact)

It’s critical that companies understand what attributes matter most to customers — and in what way. By classifying product/interaction attributes using the Kano Model, priorities become much clearer. Here’s how you make decisions:

  • Meet the minimum requirement for all of the must-be attributes
  • Add value with the one-dimensional attributes
  • Infuse a few attractive attributes to really enhance the experience
  • Make sure that you’re not investing in any indifferent attributes or creating any reverse attributes.

The bottom line: Not all customer preferences are equal. Use the Kano Model to (wisely) pick which ones to serve.