Debriefing My Qualtrics X4 Experience

X4_ImageLast week I joined more than 10,000 XM enthusiasts at the Qualtrics X4 Summit in Salt Lake City. This was my fourth X4, and the first one since joining Qualtrics. I really enjoyed seeing old friends and meeting many new ones. We have some really awesome clients!

My head is still spinning from the amazing event. Over two days, we were treated to the most incredible line-up of speakers, including President Obama, Oprah, Sir Richard Branson, Ashton Kutcher, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver, and Imagine Dragons’ lead singer Dan Reynolds. Add to that an Imagine Dragons concert, skateboard exhibition by Tony Hawk and his friends, and a dance contest to support 5 for the Fight (including tWitch). And yes, there were also a bunch of fantastic industry speakers.

There were so many extraordinary experiential elements around the event, including the environment for my two speeches. One of my talks was in a very large open space where attendees listened through headsets and the other was in an informal setting that was part of a private lounge for senior leaders. (Note: I’ll write another post to share some of that content).

Here are some of my favorite X4 moments:

  • Oprah was just purely amazing and inspiring. She talked a lot about the importance of “intention,” having clarity of your personal purpose (I am totally bought into the power of purpose). Some other lessons from her include, “your legacy is every life you touch,”  “notice what you have, not what you don’t have, and you will recognize the abundance around you,” and you need to acknowledge and validate other people. Her closing question challenged all of us: How do you use your true self in service of the world? And, I’m still chuckling about her discussion with Ryan Smith about Barnaby.
  • President Obama was so chill. He looked calm and loose, which made it very entertaining. He discussed his approach for making difficult decisions: “setup a process to figure the thing out with facts, data, and reason.” He made sure that the people in his administration were there for the right reason; not personal gain, but achieving their common mission. He required everyone to have integrity at their core. One of my favorite moments was when Obama quoted from The Departed. He discussed a scene where Mark Wahlberg’s character is asked who are you? and answers “I’m the guy doing my job. You must be the other guy.” Obama said that his staff would often use the phrase “Don’t be the other guy.” He also left us with an important charge, “focus more on our common hopes, dreams, and values, not on the things that pull us apart, and we can accomplish great things.
  • Adam Silver really surprised me. I’m a big fan of his work with the NBA, and have seen him speak at the MIT Sports Analytics Conference. But I never knew he was such a data guy. He discussed XM, like a pro. He clearly articulated how the combination of SAP and Qualtrics would help the NBA. He even discussed X-and O-data!
  • Sir Richard Branson was truly authentic. He seems like a great person to work for. He discussed how you purposely help more and more people as you get successful, expanding the circles from yourself, to your family, to your community, to the world. He called the American holiday system “a total disgrace” for not allowing workers to have more time off.  Branson believes that “every day is a fantastic learning experience,” and he also believes in promoting from within and delegating. This is what he had to say about brand, “you are only as good as your reputation, and you will need to zealously protect it.” He will only get into a new business if employees will be really proud and customers will sing its praise.
  • Bill McDermott explained why SAP & Qualtrics makes so much sense. He described SAP as a company with ‘a great brand and a good heart.’ Not only is that the type of company I want to work for, but it’s also how I would love to be personally viewed by other people. McDermott labeled XM as “the ultimate category” for enterprise software. He summed up the acquisition with a quote from Jerry Maguire, “Qualtrics completes us.” You can see a lot of what he said in this really good article.
  • Qualtrics employees delivered awesome content. Ryan And Jared Smith did a great job sharing the XM vision and highlighting amazing new capabilities in our XM platform. I was really proud of all of the Qualtrics speakers that I was able to see. The overall storyline at the event was that organizations often fail because they get blindsided; they lack good instrumentation. In order to deliver breakthrough experiences, you need more XM instrumentation.
  • Our new offerings are incredible. We announced a crazy number of game-changing additions to the Qualtrics XM Platform. We’re using AI in many areas across the platform, including to analyze data and create automated alerts about potential problems and opportunities. And our new mobile experience is pretty cool as well. Here are links to some of the other announcements:

I’ll end this post with a shout out to our XM Breakout Artist Winners:

  • CX: American Express
  • EX: Coca-Cola
  • PX: Belkin
  • BX: Sofi
  • XM: L.L.Bean

The bottom line: X4 was amazing; I’m already looking forward to next year.

2019 XM Trends From Qualtrics Thought Leaders

This is the time of year for holiday cheer, family celebrations, and, of course, listings of annual trends!

To help me identify trends for 2019, I reached out to some of the many thought leaders across Qualtrics and asked them to share one or two of the top experience management (XM) trends they are expecting to see in the coming year.

It was a great exercise. We have some amazing people across Qualtrics who regularly help organizations master all aspects of XM: Customer Experience (CX), Employee Experience (EX), Brand Experience (BX), and Product Experience (PX). And the trends they shared highlight the enormous amount of learning and maturing that’s currently happening in the field of XM. For the sake of simplicity, we organized their trends into four broad categories:

  1. Humanizing through Technology
  2. Tailoring Insights for Action
  3. Expanding Predictive Analytics
  4. Authentically Living Brand Values

1) Humanizing through Technology

Companies are starting to recognize that their customers (and their employees!) are real human beings, with their own emotions, wants, needs, beliefs, and motivations. Companies are using technology and data to not only deepen this understanding, but also deliver more emotionally resonant experiences. Here are some trends from our experts:

  • Adaptive, Conversational Listening. “Survey” has a pejorative overlay in the common vernacular in the U.S. today. Customers are over-surveyed with surveys that benefit only the company and not the customer. We’ve come up with a way to change the survey to a conversation, whilst preserving methodological rigor around validity and repeatability. Our method seems simple but is built on a sophisticated process within Qualtrics. First, we identify the conversational aspects of the feedback request before we engage a customer. A conversation is a give and take, a social contract between two people (personas, in abstract) who are exchanging a number of responses that include emotions, meanings, motivations, and memories evoked by current, previous experiences and the cues of the conversation. We identify the main constructs that we are dealing with as part of this feedback strategy: the company, the Feedback Conversation and the Persona who represents the customer, and we adapt the feedback requests based on the customer response.  (Carol Haney, Head of Research & Data Science)
  • Make It Matter To Me. The advancement and application of artificial intelligence is already enabling more meaningful customer experiences. Whether it’s via chatbot, or a truly personalized experience, artificial intelligence has the potential to truly humanize endless reams of data. (Juliana Smith Holterhaus, Ph.D., Senior XM Scientist)
  • Quantify & Discuss Customer Emotions. Thanks to rapidly evolving technologies, in 2019, I expect to see more companies measuring and discussing customer emotions. Emotions play an essential role in how we make decisions and form judgments, and consequently, they significantly impact our experiences with and loyalty to different companies. And yet companies have historically ignored emotions – dismissing them as too squishy and unquantifiable. However, recent advances in technological capabilities – such as cloud storage, processing power, machine learning, AI, natural language processing, etc. – are allowing companies to start identifying and quantifying their customers’ emotions. For example, companies can now use speech or text analytics to automatically surface emotions during customer service conversations, and new analytics can infer customers’ emotions based on their digital body language (e.g. scrolling, clicking, hovering). Additionally, machine learning enables companies to uncover patterns in customers’ behaviors and preferences, allowing them to proactively address problems and personalize customers’ experiences. (Isabelle Zdatny, CCXP, Qualtrics XM Institute)
  • AI To boost Frontline Productivity. We are increasingly seeing more companies incorporate sophisticated technologies such as virtual agents to enable smarter self-service in order to rethink operational processes and deliver immediate gratification. Contrary to beliefs that virtual agents will start to replace agents in frontend operations, we actually expect AI to help drive adoption of virtual assistants to become the primary channel of self service, while saving effort and time for agents and increasing their overall productivity, whereby they can focus on being a source of revenue rather than be a cost-center by selecting and presenting the best possible solution to the customer when engaged in LIVE calls. But, the focus will need to be maintained on relying on mechanisms which can also distinguish when the customer is confused and can understand and distinguish based on that emotion to engage a live agent – so ultimately the experience is frictionless, yet effortless from all involved. (Arpana Luthra, Principal Consultant, CX Practice)
  • Augmented Reality Will Redefine XM. Technologies like augmented and virtual reality will be important in elevating overall experiences and improving decision making. These technologies will make shopping easy, convenient, attractive and certainly differentiated – enabling customers to touch, feel, discover and explore products to create an experiential environment giving them a realistic feeling of the product or service experience much before they make a purchase decision. This will require businesses to re-imagine their people, process, technological and service strategies while ensuring they continue to deliver to their brand promise, but do so more effectively. (Arpana Luthra, Principal Consultant, CX Practice)

My Take: Organizations will increasingly focus on the fundamental component of XM—human beings. It’s important to start with an understanding of how people think, feel, and act. How can organizations apply this knowledge? By applying the Human Conversational Model to all interactions, including the growing number of digital touch points.

2) Tailoring Insights For Action

While most companies are now fairly proficient at data accumulation, collecting data just for the sake of collecting data is not useful in and of itself. Companies must actually use these insights to drive customer- and employee-centric decisions across the entire organization. To do this, they need to be strategic about how they collect information, how they tailor the information to their separate audiences, and how they use that information to identify and act on improvement opportunities. Here are some trends from our experts:

  • Activating Managers’ Engagement Skills. More companies are recognizing that a strong culture and engaged employees are not a result of HR tactics, but on how effectively individual leaders and managers are connecting with employees. I’m seeing more companies putting time into helping managers understand their role in employee engagement and identifying and removing time-consuming administrative tasks that get in the way of managers supporting, coaching, and recognizing employees every day. Companies are also working on improving the feedback managers get so that it enables managers to have more productive conversations with their employees about what’s working and not working on the job. (Aimee Lucas, CCXP, Qualtrics XM Institute)
  • From Survey To Strategy. I’m beginning to see organizations ask how the annual engagement survey can best fit into their overall people strategy. Leaders are taking an interest in linking survey results to business outcomes, aligning surveys along multiple points in the employee journey, taking action that will impact the business both immediately and 3-5 years from now. Surveying is no longer an annual look backward, but a strategic tool in moving forward. These conversations are exciting for both the client and Qualtrics. (Kara Laine, XM Scientist)
  • High Frequency Feedback Isn’t Helping. We have had several customers this year pull back from a monthly employee survey strategy to something Quarterly or even Semi-Annually. Their manager report not having the ability to action it before the next survey goes out and they are overwhelmed by the frequency. We find that instead our successful customers are working to connect with employees at meaningful touch-points, such as during onboarding or on a work anniversary, rather than focusing on frequency. (Austin Nilsson, EX Delivery Services Manager)

My Take: As I wrote in a post earlier this year, the future of VoC is insight & action, not feedback. Companies are increasingly recognizing that they need to drive four different action loops. This requires them to tailor insights to fuel different decision-making processes across an organization. That’s why Qualtrics is so committed to helping our customers deliver role-specific insights.

3) Expanding Predictive Analytics

Customers and employees increasingly expect companies recognize them as individuals, anticipate their needs, and proactively address their concerns. To meet these rising expectations, companies are using powerful analytics engines to combine rich customer and employee feedback with reams of CRM and operational data, surface meaningful patterns within that data, and then generate predictive models that allow for proactive, personalized experiences. Here are some trends from our experts:

  • Hyper-Contextualized, Not Personalized. A positive, consistent experience has long become a table stake. Today’s customers want organizations to respect their time. A good product at a competitive price is no longer the basis for differentiation. Truly customer-centric organizations will increasingly leverage data-driven analytics to spot customers’ buying patterns, behaviors across channels and touch points to design experiences and content, at a time customers want it and deliver them proactively rather than reactively. Customers will increasingly look for a unique, customized experience that is memorable and reminiscent of a personal relationship. There will likely be a rise in teams and knowledge centers focused on identifying the experience along these personalized journeys. Closely tied will be the importance of measuring customer emotions and understanding how they feel in the moment because customers who have a negative experience during a brand interaction are more likely not to forgive that company. We expect analytics to not only empower brands to personalize experiences, but also enable them to identify and prevent issues before they would happen, so they can now shift resources not to problem solve but to get ahead of them. (Arpana Luthra, Principal Consultant, CX Practice)
  • People Analytics. People analytics involves deriving insights from employee data and advanced analytics to make talent management decisions to drive revenue and growth. Over 70% of companies now consider people analytics a high priority, but only 10% believe they have a good understanding of which talent dimensions drive performance in their organizations. People analytics may be leveraged alongside data captured at every employee touchpoint to develop algorithmic selection systems, dynamic workforce planning models, and social networks informing organizational silos and influence between and within teams – to name a few possibilities. (Brandon Riggs, EX Internal Program Lead)

My Take: Historically, insights have been used to describe what has happened in the past. While this retrospective provides value, the ultimate objective is to use insights to prescribe best actions for the future. As predictive analytics becomes more accessible and companies blend together X- and O-Data, we’ll see a surge in predictive recommendations. Qualtrics is putting a lot of energy into making these advance analytics much more accessible to business users.

4) Authentically Living Brand Values

People want to interact with organizations whose policies and practices align with their personal principles, ideals, and attitudes. Companies can build trust and emotionally engage both their customers and employees by authentically championing social causes and demonstrating that they share the same values as their target customer segments. Here are some trends from our experts:

  • Merging Inclusivity And CX. We’ve seen multiple news articles over the past year surrounding how companies can create better online experiences for customers with disabilities. One of my favorite CX-related stories from 2018 was on the work of the Hearing and Speech Agency in Baltimore, MD. The organization is working with D.C. area restaurants to train workers on how to understand and create enjoyable experiences for customers with speech disabilities and disorders. Starbucks also opened its first U.S. sign language store in Washington, DC this past year. (Stephanie Thum, CCXP Chief Advisor, Federal Customer Experience)
  • Maturing Of Customer Journey Mapping. Customer journey maps will sustain their momentum as a popular tool to diagnose and design customer experiences. Successful journey mapping companies avoid the common of mistake of assuming the map itself is the “finish line” but rather bring cross-functional subject matter experts together who use the map’s findings to take action around the key moments of truth that deliver on an organization’s brand promises. In 2019, more companies will use journey maps to highlight the emotional impact of the experience as a way to raise empathy for customers among employees, regardless of their roles. Companies will also shift from using maps solely to capture the current state experience and begin to use them to keep the broader journey in mind while innovating future-state customer interactions. (Aimee Lucas, CCXP, Qualtrics XM Institute)
  • Fusing The Concepts Of Ethics And BX. Customers oftentimes look to online reviews and ratings to make decisions, anticipating or expecting experiences that may be based on those reviews and ratings. But what about when reviewers have been compensated to write positive reviews, incentivized to do so with a discount on a future purchase, or reviews are just plain fake? Similarly, what are the CX ethical implications of score begging, when auto dealerships, for example, beg for 10s on a survey, rather than allow customers to provide an honest review that would then possibly trickle out via marketing to other, future customers? How do we consider and think about these things when creating or honestly evaluating the experience customers are having with brands? (Stephanie Thum, CCXP Chief Advisor, Federal Customer Experience)

My Take: For an organization to optimize its CX, BX, PX, and BX efforts, it must have a deep understanding of its core values. Without this clarity around a true north, it’s nearly impossible to align priorities across an organization. We’ve seen companies live their values by translating customer promises into employee actions —and we expect to see even more of this activity going forward. I recently discussed how Starbucks should have used this approach for training after its recent issues.

The bottom line: 2019 will be an exciting year for XM!

What’s All This About X- And O-Data?

1811_XODataYou might have heard Qualtrics discussing X-data (experience data) and O-data (operational data), and wondered, should we care? The answer is yes, and here’s why.

Let’s start with a basic premise that no individual experience exists in a vacuum. People form their opinions about any experience based on a collection of different factors. The more we can understand those factors, the better we can extrapolate the insights about a single personal experience to form a deeper understanding about other people’s experiences.

Now to my discussion of Xs and Os, starting with customer experience (CX)…

Let’s say that your company has this data:

  • X-Data: NPS responses
  • O-Data: Customer product ownership and support history.

With X-data, you can calculate an NPS for the customers who responded. You can also dig into their feedback, and hopefully understand what’s causing promoters and what’s causing detractors.

That’s extremely valuable, but it only tells you what’s going on with the people who happened to respond to the survey.

By combining O-data with your X-data you can examine (especially through predictive analytics) what types of products and service interactions lead to promoters and detractors, and use this data to calculate the NPS for large portions of your customer base–—even for customers who never responded to a survey.

It could be that ownership of a certain version of a product tied together with a specific type of customer service problem is highly likely to create detractors. You can identify all the customers with that profile and take proactive measures to correct the issues — even though they may never have complained.

Result: More loyal customers and more targeted use of your resources.

This works across all areas, even with employee experience (EX). Let’s assume you have this data:

  • X-Data: Employee satisfaction study
  • O-Data: Employee tenure, promotion history, most recent performance rating

With X-data, you can determine how employees feel about their next steps at the company. You can also dig into their feedback, and hopefully understand what’s causing higher vs. lower levels of career satisfaction.

By combining O-data with your X-data you can examine what influence tenure, promotion history, and performance may have on satisfaction, and use this data to identify segments of employees to invite to participate in a high-potential development program.

Result: More high-performing workforce because you’re investing in the right employees.

Hopefully you can see how the combination of X- and O-data can increase your CX and EX insights. The same dynamic also holds true for brand experience (BX) and product experience (PX). By combining and analyzing the different types of data, you can use feedback from a few people to build an understanding of many, many more. This allows you to better prioritize investments, while making more targeted and impactful changes.

The bottom line: X- and O-data together provides an analytics goldmine.

Report: Tech Vendor NPS & Loyalty Benchmark, 2018 (B2B)

We just published Temkin Group’s annual Tech Vendor NPS & Loyalty Benchmark Study. Here’s the executive summary:

Temkin Group Net Promoter Score (NPS) & Loyalty Benchmark Study of B2B Tech VendorsFor the seventh year in a row, we have calculated the Net Promoter Score® (NPS®) of over 60 technology vendors and analyzed the correlation between NPS and four client loyalty behaviors – likelihood of repurchasing from that technology vendor, likelihood of trying new offerings, likelihood of forgiving the vendor if it makes a mistake, and willingness to act as a reference for the vendor. To gather this data, we surveyed 800 IT decision-makers from large North American firms about their relationships with their technology providers. Through this research, we found that:

  • Across the 61 tech vendors we examined, NPS ranged from +51 to -22.
  • VMware, IBM software products, DellEMC, and Microsoft server software earned the highest NPS, while Check Point, Splunk, and Alcatel-Lucent received the lowest.
  • Overall, the average NPS for the tech vendor industry stayed steady from last year, declining only slightly from 21.4 in 2017 to 21.2 this year.
  • Our analysis shows that NPS is strongly correlated to customers’ willingness to spend more with tech vendors, try their new products and services, forgive them after a bad experience, and act as a reference for them with prospective clients.
  • In addition to examining NPS, the research also provides a benchmark of several areas of loyalty. IT decision-makers are most likely to purchase more from DellEMC and Microsoft server software, try new offerings from Oracle outsourcing and Dell outsourcing, forgive Oracle outsourcing and Micro Focus if they make a mistake, and act as a reference for AWS and IBM outsourcing.

This report includes a .pdf report and a spreadsheet with the company-level data. You can see a sample of the data spreadsheet (.xls).

Download report for $695+
ROI of Customer Experience (CX), 2018

Here are two of the 11 graphics in the report:

Download report for $695+ROI of Customer Experience (CX), 2018


Report Outline:

  • Net Promoter Scores for 61 Tech Vendors
    • VMware Earns Top Net Promoter Score
    • Net Promoter Score Correlates to Multiple Aspects of Loyalty

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Net Promoter Score (NPS) of 61 Tech Vendors
  2. Average NPS for Tech Vendors, 2012 to 2018
  3. Likelihood of Repurchasing from Tech Vendors
  4. NPS Versus Likely to Repurchase
  5. NPS Responses Versus Likely to Repurchase
  6. Temkin Innovation Equity Quotient(TIEQ) of Tech Vendors
  7. NPS Versus Temkin Innovation Equity Quotient
  8. Temkin Forgiveness Ratings (TFR) of Tech Vendors
  9. NPS Versus Temkin Forgiveness Ratings
  10. Willingness to Act As A Reference For Tech Vendors
  11. NPS Versus Willingness To Act As A Reference

Download report for $695+ROI of Customer Experience (CX), 2018

Note: Net Promoter Score, Net Promoter, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Satmetrix Systems, and Fred Reichheld.

Report: ROI of Customer Experience, 2018

ROI of Customer Experience (CX), 2018We just published a Temkin Group report, ROI of Customer Experience, 2018. Here’s the executive summary:

To understand the connection between customer experience (CX) and loyalty, we examined feedback from 10,000 U.S. consumers describing both their experiences with and their loyalty to different companies. The CX scores used in this model come from the 2018 Temkin Experience Ratings (TxR), which evaluated 318 companies across 20 industries. Our analysis shows that:

  • The correlation between CX and repurchasing is very high (Pearson correlation= 0.82).
  • There’s a 21-point difference in Net Promoter Score between consumers who’ve had a very good experience with a company and those who’ve had a very poor experience.
  • CX is made up of three components – success, effort, and emotion. While all three elements impact customer loyalty, an improvement in emotion drives the most significant increase in loyalty.
  • We built a model to estimate how a modest improvement in CX would impact the revenue of a typical $1 billion company across in 20 industries. On average, companies can gain $775 million over three years. Software companies stand to earn the most ($1 billion over three years), while utilities stand to earn the least ($476 million over three years).
  • The report contains data charts showing how loyalty levels change based on customer experience across 20 industries.
  • We also describe a five-step process for calculating the ROI of CX for your organization.

Download report for $195+
ROI of Customer Experience (CX), 2018

Here are two of the 14 graphics in the report:

Correlation between customer experience (CX) improvement and future purchase intentionsRevenue increase from improvement in customer experience (CX)

Download report for $195+ROI of Customer Experience (CX), 2018


Report Outline

  • Customer Experience Is Highly Correlated With Loyalty
    • Correlates with repurchasing
    • Links to Net Promoter Score
    • Significantly impacts emotion
  • CX Improvements Results: Up to $1.1B In Revenue Over Three Years
  • CX and Loyalty Across 20 Industries
    • Recommend a company
    • Repurchase from a company
    • Trust a company
    • Forgive a company
    • Try a new offering right away
  • Build Your Own CX ROI Model

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Customer Experience Correlates to Future Purchase Intentions
  2. Customer Experience Correlates to Net Promoter® Scores (NPS®)
  3. Impact of SuccessEffort, and Emotion on Loyalty (Average Across 20 Industries)
  4. Elements Used in Model to Derive Revenue Impact Based on Improvement in Customer Experience
  5. Improvements in Customer Loyalty From Modest Improvements in Customer Experience
  6. Revenue Increases From A Moderate Improvement in Customer Experience
  7. Revenue Increases From A Moderate Improvement in Customer Experience (Details)
  8. Loyalty Differences Across CX Performance Levels
  9. Recommendations Based on Customer Experience
  10. Likelihood to Repurchase Based on Customer Experience
  11. Trust Based on Customer Experience
  12. Forgiveness Based on Customer Experience
  13. Try New Products Based on Customer Experience
  14. Steps for Calculating the Value Of Customer Experience

Download report for $195+
ROI of Customer Experience (CX), 2018

Propelling Experience Design (Infographic)

In the report Propelling Experience Design Across An Organization, we examine how companies can best use a very important skill, experience design. This infographic provides an overview.

Here are links to download different versions of the infographic:

Here are some of the reports with data included in the infographic:

Report: The Customer Journeys That Matter The Most

Few organizations deliver outstanding experiences to their customers. In fact, only 6% of companies earned an “excellent” score in the 2018 Temkin Experience Ratings. To better understand which types of interactions are most likely to affect the customer’s perception of an organization, we asked customers to identify the most problematic journeys across 19 different industries. In this report, we:

  • Examine feedback from 10,000 U.S. consumers about their journeys with 318 companies across 19 industries.
  • Identify which customer journeys consumers think most need improvement and look at how those responses differ across age groups.
  • Evaluate how different customer journeys impact five loyalty behaviors: likelihood to recommend the company, likelihood to repurchase from the company, likelihood to forgive the company if it makes a mistake, likelihood to trust the company, and likelihood of trying new offerings from the company.
  • One of the key findings across industries is that journeys that touch customer service are often the most prevalent and the most impactful on customer loyalty.

Download report for $195
Purchase and download Temkin Group report: The Customer Journeys That Matter The Most

Here’s the first figure in the report, which has a total of 58 figures (three detailed graphics for each of the industries):

Most Problematic Customer Journeys Across Industries

Download report for $195
Purchase and download Temkin Group report: The Customer Journeys That Matter The Most


Report Outline:

  • Why Focus On Customer Journeys?
  • Examining Customer Journeys Across 19 Industries
    • Banking Customer Journeys
    • Computers & Tablets Customer Journeys
    • Insurance Customer Journeys
    • Investment Customer Journeys
    • Credit Card Customer Journeys
    • Health Plan Customer Journeys
    • TV & Internet Service Customer Journeys
    • Parcel Delivery Customer Journeys
    • Wireless Carriers Customer Journeys
    • Airline Customer Journeys
    • Hotels & Rooms Customer Journeys
    • Retail Customer Journeys
    • Fast Food Chains Customer Journeys
    • Rental Car Customer Journeys
    • Supermarket Customer Journeys
    • TV & Appliance Customer Journeys
    • Auto Dealers Customer Journeys
    • Software Customer Journeys
    • Utility Customer Journeys

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Most Problematic Customer Journeys Across Industries
  2. Banking: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  3. Banking: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  4. Banking: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  5. Computers & Tablets: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  6. Computers & Tablets: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  7. Computers & Tablets: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  8. Insurance: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  9. Insurance: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  10. Insurance: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  11. Investments: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  12. Investments: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  13. Investments: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  14. Credit Cards: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  15. Credit Cards: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  16. Credit Cards: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  17. Health Plans: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  18. Health Plans: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  19. Health Plans: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  20. TV & Internet Service: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  21. TV & Internet Service: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  22. TV & Internet Service: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  23. Parcel Delivery: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  24. Parcel Delivery: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  25. Parcel Delivery: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  26. Wireless Carriers: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  27. Wireless Carriers: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  28. Wireless Carriers: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  29. Airlines: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  30. Airlines: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  31. Airlines: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  32. Hotels & Rooms: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  33. Hotels & Rooms: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  34. Hotels & Rooms: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  35. Retailers: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  36. Retailers: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  37. Retailers: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  38. Fast Food: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  39. Fast Food: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  40. Fast Food: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  41. Rental Cars & Transport: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  42. Rental Cars & Transport: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  43. Rental Cars & Transport: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  44. Supermarkets: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  45. Supermarkets: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  46. Supermarkets: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  47. TVs & Appliances: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  48. TVs & Appliances: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  49. TVs & Appliances: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  50. Auto Dealers: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  51. Auto Dealers: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  52. Auto Dealers: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  53. Software Firms: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  54. Software Firms: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  55. Software Firms: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  56. Utilities: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  57. Utilities: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  58. Utilities: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups

Download report for $195
Purchase and download Temkin Group report: The Customer Journeys That Matter The Most

Report: Propelling Experience Design Across An Organization

Propelling Experience Design Across An OrganizationWe just published a Temkin Group report, Propelling Experience Design Across An Organization.

Although customer experience (CX) management has become a relatively common activity within large organizations, companies still struggle to deliver consistently positive experiences to their customers. One major issue impeding companies’ current CX efforts is that few organizations design customer interactions in a purposeful and deliberate manner. This report explores how companies can use Experience Design – which we define as a repeatable, human-centric approach for creating emotionally resonant interactions – to craft consistently excellent interactions and how they can share and spread these capabilities across the entire organization.

Download report for $195
buy the state of customer experience management report

Here are some highlights from this report:

  • The Experience Design process is made up of three generic phases (Clarification, Generation, Realization), each of which contains two stages (empathize and synthesize, conceptualize and materialize, scrutinize and actualize).
  • To help propel Experience Design capabilities across the organization, we developed The Federated Experience Design Model, which is made up of three tiers of employees – Experts, Boosters, and Dabblers.
  • We share over 30 examples of best practices from companies that are spreading and sharing Experience Design capabilities throughout their entire organization.
  • We also provide some tools that employees can use across the six stages of the Experience Design process.

The move towards propelling CX across an organization is part of a broader trend that we describe in the report, The Federated Customer Experience Model.

Here are two of the 22 figures in the report:

Process, Mindsets, and Skills of Experience DesignFederated Experience Design Model

Download report for $195
download the state of customer experience management


Report Outline:

  • Customers Suffer from Haphazard Experiences
  • Components of an Experience Design Methodology
    • Phase 1) Clarification: Understand the Objectives
    • Phase 2) Generation: Explore Potential Solutions
    • Phase 3) Realization: Share Solutions with Customers
  • Federating Experience Design Across an Organization
    • The role of Experts, Boosters, and Dabblers
  • Simple Experience Design Tools Support Federation

Figures in the Report:

  1. Process, Mindsets, and Skills of Experience Design
  2. Experience Design Mindsets
  3. Experience Design Skills
  4. Examples Across the Experience Design Processes
  5. Examples Across the Experience Design Processes
  6. Examples of Empathizing
  7. Three Levels of a Federated Experience Design Model
  8. Federated Experience Design Model
  9. Means of Providing Ongoing Coaching and Support
  10. IBM Design Thinking Badge Program
  11. Tools Across the Three Levels of Employees
  12. Tools for Clarification: Empathize
  13. Tools for Clarification: Synthesize
  14. Tools for Generation: Conceptualize
  15. Tools for Generation: Materialize
  16. Tools for Realization: Scrutinize and Actualize
  17. Customer Journey Maps
  18. Customer Journey Thinking™
  19. Temkin Group’s SLICE-B Experience Review Methodology
  20. Temkin Group’s SLICE-B Experience Review Assessment
  21. Empathy Maps
  22. Starbursting

Download report for $195
download the state of customer experience management

Report: Tech Vendors: Product and Relationship Satisfaction, 2018

Tech Vendors: Product & Relationship Satisfaction of IT ClientsWe just published a Temkin Group data snapshot, Tech Vendors: Product and Relationship Satisfaction of IT Clients, 2018.

During Q3 of 2017, we surveyed 800 IT decision-makers from companies with at least $250 million in annual revenues, asking them to rate both the products of and their relationships with 58 different tech vendors. Google, Oracle outsourcing, and Microsoft servers earned the top overall scores, while Autodesk, ADP outsourcing, and Fujitsu received the lowest overall scores. To determine their product rating, we evaluated tech vendors across four product/service criteria: features, quality, flexibility, and ease of use. And we calculated their relationship rating using four different criteria: technical support, support of the account team, cost of ownership, and innovation of company. We also looked at how the average product and relationship scores of tech vendors have changed over the previous four years and found that both product/service and relationship satisfaction have dropped to their lowest levels since the study began.

This research has a report (.pdf) and a dataset (excel). The dataset has the details of Product/Service and Relationship satisfaction for the 58 tech vendors as well as for 31 other tech vendors with sample sizes too small to be included in the published report. Here is a sample of the dataset.

Download report for $495
(includes Excel spreadsheet with data)
BuyDownload3

Here’s a link to last year’s study.

Here are the overall results:

Here are the data graphics in the report:

  1. Questions Used to Drive Analysis
  2. Overall Product & Relationship Satisfaction Ratings
  3. Product & Relationship Satisfaction Component Scores
  4. Top Half in Product Satisfaction Ratings
  5. Bottom Half in Product Satisfaction Ratings
  6. Top Half in Relationship Satisfaction Ratings
  7. Bottom Half in Relationship Satisfaction Ratings
  8. Product & Relationship Satisfaction Component Scores, 2014 to 2017

Report details: When you purchase this research, you will receive a written data snapshot and an excel spreadsheet with more data. The dataset has the details of Product/Service and Relationship satisfaction for the 58 tech vendors as well as for 31 tech vendors with sample sizes too small to be included in the published report. If you want to know more about the data file, download this SAMPLE SPREADSHEET without the data (.xls).

Download report for $495
(includes Excel spreadsheet with data)
BuyDownload3

Report: The State of CX Metrics, 2017

Purchase and download report: State of Customer Experience (CX) MetricsWe published a Temkin Group report, The State of CX Metrics, 2017.

Temkin Group surveyed 169 companies to learn about how they use customer experience (CX) metrics and then compared their answers with similar studies we’ve conducted annually since 2011. We also had them complete our CX Metrics Program Assessment that evaluates the degree to which these efforts are Consistent, Impactful, Integrated, and Continuous.

Here are some of the highlights:

  • Only 11% of CX metrics programs received “strong” or “very strong” ratings, while 64% of companies received “weak” or “very weak” ratings. Only one out of five companies earned at least a moderate rating for being Integrated.
  • Sixty-five percent of companies are good at collecting and calculating metrics, but less than 20% are good at using analytics to predict future changes in the CX metric.
  • Satisfaction and likelihood to recommend remain the most popular CX metrics, with satisfaction at a transactional level delivering the most positive impact.
  • Only 10% of companies always or almost always make explicit tradeoffs between CX metrics and financial results.
  • Companies identified the lack of taking action based on CX metrics as a top obstacle to their programs. The identification of this as a top problem increased the most between 2016 (54%) and 2017 (62%).
  • We asked companies about their effectiveness at measuring 19 different elements of customer experience. They are most effective at measuring customer service, phone interactions, and customers who are using their products and services. They are least effective at measuring the experiences of prospects, customers who have defected, and multi-channel interactions.
  • When we compared companies with stronger CX metrics programs with those with weaker efforts, we found that the stronger firms have better overall CX results, more frequently use and get value from likelihood to recommend metrics, and report fewer obstacles.

Download report for $195
Purchase and download report: State of Customer Experience Metrics

Here are the results from Temkin Group’s CX Metrics Program Assessment:

Download report for $195
Purchase and download report: State of Customer Experience Metrics


Report Outline:

  • How Companies Are Using CX Metrics
    • Effectiveness of Measuring Different Customer Experiences
  • Competency & Maturity of CX Metrics Programs
    • Temkin Group’s CX Metrics Competency and Maturity Assessment
  • Examining Stronger CX Metrics Programs
  • Assess and Improve Your CX Metrics Programs
    • Build A Strong CX Metrics Program in Five Steps

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Effectiveness of Components of CX Metrics Programs
  2. Effectiveness of Components of CX Metrics Programs (2015 to 2017)
  3. Use of CX Metrics (2015 to 2017)
  4. Effectiveness of Components of CX Metrics Programs
  5. Effectiveness of Components of CX Metrics Programs (2015 to 2017)
  6. Elements of CX Metrics Programs
  7. Elements of CX Metrics Programs (2015 to 2017)
  8. Problems With CX Metrics Programs (2015 to 2017)
  9. CX Measurement Across The Customer Lifecycle
  10. CX Measurement Across Different Types of Customers
  11. CX Measurement Across Different Types of Customers
  12. CX Measurement Across Different Elements of Experience
  13. CX Measurement Across Different Elements of Experience
  14. Temkin Group’s CX Metrics Program Assessment
  15. Results From Temkin Group Assessment of CX Metrics Programs
  16. Comparing Strong and Weak CX Metrics Programs: Customer Experience and Business Performance
  17. Comparing Strong and Weak CX Metrics Programs: Metrics Tracked
  18. Comparing Strong and Weak CX Metrics Programs: Successful Use of Metrics
  19. Comparing Strong and Weak CX Metrics Programs: Measurement Effectiveness
  20. Comparing Strong and Weak CX Metrics Programs: Obstacles to Success
  21. Percentiles of Results From Temkin Group CX Competency Assessment
  22. Five Steps For Building a Strong CX Metrics Program

Download report for $195
Purchase and download report: State of Customer Experience Metrics

Report: 2017 Temkin Experience Ratings of Tech Vendors

Temkin Experience Ratings of Tech Vendors Benchmarks Customer ExperienceWe just published a Temkin Group report 2017 Temkin Experience Ratings of Tech Vendors that rates the customer experience of 58 large tech vendors based on a survey of 800 IT decision makers from large North American firms. This is the sixth year of the ratings, here are links to the 2012, 201320142015, and 2016 ratings.

Here is the executive summary of the report:

The 2017 Temkin Experience Ratings of Tech Vendors evaluates the customer experience of 58 large technology vendors. We surveyed 800 IT decision-makers from large companies regarding three components – success, effort, and emotion – of their experiences with these IT providers. Here are some of the highlights:

  • Out of all the vendors we looked at, VMware, IBM software & IBM SPSS, and Google earned the highest ratings, while ADP outsourcing, Unisys, Autodesk, and Fujitsu received the lowest.
  • When we compared this year’s results with data from the previous five Temkin Experience Ratings of Tech Vendors, we found that the average rating dropped over the past year, down from 58% in 2016 to 54% in 2017.
  • Compared with companies in the bottom quartile of the Temkin Experience Ratings, those in the upper quartile have customers who are 1.3 times more likely to repurchase from them, 2.5 times more likely to try new offerings, and 2.1 times more likely to forgive the company if it makes a mistake.
  • Companies in this upper quartile of ratings have a Net Promoter Score that’s an average of 28 points higher than their bottom quartile counterparts.
  • To improve customer experience, tech vendors will need to master Four CX Core Competencies: Purposeful Leadership, Compelling Brand Values, Employee Engagement, and Customer Connectedness.

Download for $695, includes report (.pdf) and data file (.xls)
[Download sample of data file (.xls)]
BuyDownload3

The Temkin Experience Ratings of Tech Vendors evaluates three areas of customer experience: success (can customers achieve what they want to do), effort (how easy is it for customers to do what they want to do), and emotion (how do customers feel about their interaction). Here are the overall results:

Read More …

Report: Temkin Loyalty Index, 2017

Temkin Loyalty Index Report 2017We published a Temkin Group report, Temkin Loyalty Index, 2017. This is the third year of this study that examines the loyalty of 10,000 U.S. consumers to 329 companies across 20 industries.

To determine companies’ Temkin Loyalty Index (TLi), we asked respondents to rate how likely they are to exhibit five loyalty-related behaviors: repurchasing from the company, recommending the company to others, forgiving the company if it makes a mistake, trusting the company, and trying the company’s new offerings.

Download report for $295
(Includes report plus dataset in Excel. See sample spreadsheet (.xls))
Buy Temkin Loyalty Index 2017 Report

Temkin Group’s TLi is based on evaluating consumers’ likelihood to do these five things (data for these items are included in the dataset):

  • Repurchase from the company
  • Recommend the company to others
  • Forgive the company if it makes a mistake
  • Trust the company
  • Try new offerings from the company

Here are some highlights of the research:

  • ACE Rent A Car and Advantage Rent-A-Car earned the highest TLi, while Time Warner Cable earned the lowest.
  • Supermarkets engender the strongest loyalty in their customers, while TV/Internet service providers engender the least.
  • NFCU and ACE Rent a Car most outpace their industries, while Spirit Airlines and Avis lag the farthest behind.
  • Customers are most likely to recommend ACE Rent a Car, AmazonFresh, and NFCU and least likely to recommend Time Warner Cable, Comcast, and Cox Communications.
  • Customers are most likely to repurchase from Publix, H-E-B, and Trader Joe’s and least likely to repurchase from Time Warner Cable, Comcast, and Cox Communications.
  • Customers are most likely to forgive Advantage Rent-A-Car, ACE Rent A Car, Fujitsu and NFCU and least likely to forgive Comcast, Time Warner Cable, and Cox Communications.
  • Customers are most likely to try a new offering from ACE Rent A Car, Advantage Rent-A-Car, and Siemens and least likely to show product loyalty to Fifth Third, Citizens, and Time Warner Cable.
  • USAA and NFCU are the most trusted companies, while Time Warner Cable, Comcast, and Cox Communications are the least. All of the industries saw an increase in loyalty over last year, though utilities saw the most dramatic improvement.

Here are the top and bottom rated companies:

2017 Top and Bottom companies in the Temkin Loyalty Index

Here are the overall industry average TLi:

Temkin Loyalty Index range of industry scores

Download report for $295
(Includes report plus dataset in Excel. See sample spreadsheet (.xls))
BuyDownload3


Report Outline:

  • Temkin Loyalty Index Evaluates Five Areas if Loyalty
  • Consumers Are Most Loyal to ACE Rent A Car and Advantage Rent-A-Car
    • Leaders and Laggards Across Five Areas of Loyalty
  • Loyalty Is On The Rise

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Temkin Loyalty Index is Based on Five Components
  2. 2017 Temkin Loyalty Index Evaluates 329 Companies Across 20 Industries
  3. 2017 Temkin Loyalty Index (TLi), Top 50 Organizations
  4. 2017 Temkin Loyalty Index (TLi), Bottom 50 Organizations
  5. 2017 Temkin Loyalty Index (TLi), Range of Industry Scores
  6. Range of Industry Averages For Components of Temkin Loyalty Index
  7. Industry Loyalty Scores
  8. 2017 Temkin Loyalty Index, Industry Leaders and Laggards
  9. 2017 Temkin Loyalty Index, Most Above and Below Industry Average
  10. 2017 Temkin Loyalty Index (TLi), Leaders and laggards in RecommendComponent
  11. 2017 Temkin Loyalty Index (TLi), Leaders and laggards in Buy MoreComponent
  12. 2017 Temkin Loyalty Index (TLi), Leaders and laggards in ForgiveComponent
  13. 2017 Temkin Loyalty Index (TLi), Leaders and laggards in Try New OfferingsComponent
  14. 2017 Temkin Loyalty Index (TLi), Leaders and laggards in TrustComponent
  15. Temkin Loyalty Index, 2016 to 2017
  16. Changes in Industry Loyalty Scores, 2016 to 2017
  17. Temkin Loyalty Index, Most Improved And Most Declined Between 2016 and 2017

Download report for $295
(Includes report plus dataset in Excel. See sample spreadsheet (.xls))
BuyDownload3


Here are the 2016 Temkin Loyalty Index and the 2015 Temkin Loyalty Index.

Methodology

We report on companies that have feedback form at least 100 consumers who have interacted with the company over the previous 90 days. This ends up in 329 companies across 20 industries. The TLi is the average of five different measures of loyalty for each of those companies:

Temkin Loyalty Index methodology

Report: State of Voice of the Customer Programs, 2017

State of Voice of the Customer Programs, 2017We just published a Temkin Group report, State of Voice of the Customer Programs, 2017. Here’s the executive summary:

For the seventh straight year, Temkin Group has benchmarked the competency and maturity levels of voice of the customer (VoC) programs within large organizations. This year we surveyed close to 200 large companies and asked them to complete Temkin Group’s VoC Competency and Maturity Assessment, which evaluates their capabilities across what we call the “Six Ds:” Detect, Disseminate, Diagnose, Discuss, Design, and Deploy. This report also includes data from these companies’ responses to help you benchmark your own company’s VoC efforts. We compared this year’s results with those from previous years and found that:

  • While most companies think that their VoC efforts are successful, less than one-quarter of companies consider themselves good at making changes to the business based on the insights.
  • Companies find their VoC programs to be most valuable for “identifying and fixing quick-hit operational issues” and least valuable for “identifying innovative product and service ideas.”
  • Companies expect technology will continue to heavily impact their VoC programs in the future, especially for integrating survey data with CRM and operational data.
  • In the future, companies expect the most important source of insights to be customer interaction history and the least important source to be multiple-choice questions.
  • The most common activity for VoC teams is defining customer experience metrics for their companies, and this activity became even more popular over the past year.
  • Only 14% of companies have reached the two highest levels of VoC maturity (out of six levels), while 46% remain in the bottom two levels.
  • When we compared higher-scoring VoC programs with lower-scoring programs, we found that companies with mature programs are more successful, technology-focused, and mobile-oriented and have more full-time staff and more involved senior executives.
  • Companies with more mature VoC programs identified “integration across systems” as the most common obstacle they face, while less mature VoC programs struggle the most with “cooperation across the organization.”

Download report for $195+
Buy the State of the Voice Of the customer programs report

Here’s the VoC competency & maturity levels, which is one of 29 graphics in the report:

Voice of the customer competency and maturity levels

Download report for $195+Buy the state of the voice of the customer programs report


Report Outline:

  • VoC Programs are Successful, But Have Room To Improve
  • Assessing the Maturity of VoC Programs
    • Six D’s: Detect, Disseminate, Diagnose, Discuss, Design, and Deploy
    • Five Levels of VoC Maturity – From Novices to Transformers
  • Anatomy of Successful VoC Programs
  • Propel Your VoC Program to the Next Generation

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Effectiveness of Voice of the Customer Programs
  2. Evaluation of Voice of the Customer Elements
  3. Where Companies Get Value From VoC Programs
  4. How Technology Enables Voice of the Customer Programs
  5. Changing Importance of Customer Insight Channels
  6. Collecting Customer Feedback Via Mobile
  7. Structure of Voice of the Customer Organizations
  8. Responsibilities of Voice of the Customer Teams
  9. Voice of the Customer Executive Involvement
  10. Obstacles to Voice of the Customer Success
  11. Six D’s of a Successful Closed-Loop Voice of the Customer Program
  12. Maturity Levels of Voice of the Customer Programs
  13. Temkin Group Voice of the Customer Program Competency and Maturity Assessment (Page 1 of 2)
  14. Temkin Group Voice of the Customer Program Competency and Maturity Assessment (Page 2 of 2)
  15. 10 Highest Scoring Competency Questions
  16. 10 Lowest Scoring Competency Questions
  17. Competency Questions That Increased The Most Between 2016 and 2017
  18. Competency Questions That Decreased The Most Between 2016 and 2017
  19. Voice of the Customer Competency and Maturity Levels
  20. Voice of the Customer Competency and Maturity Levels, Changes
  21. Success Rates of VoC Programs Based on VoC Maturity
  22. VoC Insight Sources and Technology Based on VoC Maturity
  23. Mobile VoC Based on VoC Maturity
  24. Areas of Success Based on VoC Maturity
  25. The VoC Organization Based on VoC Maturity
  26. Responsibilities of VoC Teams Based on VoC Maturity
  27. Senior Executive Involvement in VoC Based on VoC Maturity
  28. Key Obstacles Based on VoC Maturity
  29. Percentiles of Results From Temkin Group VoC Competency & Maturity Assessment

Download report for $195+Buy the state of the voice of the customer programs report

Report: Tech Vendor NPS Benchmark, 2017 (B2B)

tech vendor NPS benchmark studyWe just published a Temkin Group report, Tech Vendor NPS Benchmark, 2017. The research examines Net Promoter Scores® (NPS®) and the link to loyalty for 58 tech vendors based on feedback from 800 IT decision makers in large North American organizations. We also compared overall results to our benchmarks from the previous five years. Here’s the executive summary:

For the sixth year in a row, we looked at the correlation between NPS and loyalty for technology vendors. To examine this link, we surveyed 800 IT decision-makers from large North American firms, asking about their relationships with their technology providers. Through this research, we found that:

  • Across the 58 tech vendors we examined, NPS ranged from +43 to -22.
  • Microsoft, SAS, Google, and VMware earned the highest NPS, while Accenture consulting, ACS, Autodesk, and Fujitsu received the lowest.
  • Overall, the average NPS for the tech vendor industry decreased by more than eight points from last year, down from 29.9 to 21.4 – the lowest level of any year we’ve studied.
  • Our analysis shows that NPS is correlated to customers’ willingness to spend more with tech vendors, try their new products and services, forgive them after a bad experience, and act as a reference for them with prospective clients.
  • When it comes to loyalty, IT decision-makers are most likely to purchase more from Microsoft and HP, try new offerings from Microsoft and Google, forgive SAS and Microsoft if they make a mistake, and act as a reference for Apple and IBM SPSS.

The report includes graphics with data for NPS, likelihood to repurchase, Temkin Forgiveness Ratings, and Temkin Innovation Equity Quotient (likely to try new offerings).. The excel spreadsheet includes this data (in more detail) for the 58 companies as well as summary data for other tech vendors with less than 40 pieces of feedback. It also includes the summary NPS scores from 2016.

Download report for $695
Purchase includes Excel spreadsheet with data.
Download sample spreadsheet to see details. 
buy tech vendor nps benchmark study

As you can see in the chart below, the NPS ranges from a high of 43 for Microsoft servers down to  a low of -22 for Fujitsu.the Net promoter score of 58 tech vendors

The industry average NPS decreased from 29.9 last year to 21.4 this year this year.

the average net promoter score for tech vendors

Report details: The report includes graphics with data for NPS, likelihood to repurchase, Temkin Forgiveness Ratings, and Temkin Innovation Equity Quotient (likely to try new offerings). The excel spreadsheet includes this data (in more detail) for the 58 companies as well as summary data for other tech vendors with less than 40 pieces of feedback. It also includes the summary NPS scores from 2016.

Download report for $695
Purchase includes Excel spreadsheet with data.
Download sample spreadsheet to see details. 
download net promoter score for tech vendors report


Report Outline:

  • Net Promoter Scores for 58 Tech Vendors
    • Microsoft, SAS, Google, and VMware Earn Top Net Promoter Scores
    • Net Promoter Score Correlates to Multiple Aspects of Loyalty

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) of 58 Tech Vendors
  2. Average NPS for Tech Vendors, 2012 to 2017
  3. Likely to Repurchase for Tech Vendors
  4. NPS Versus Likely to Repurchase
  5. Temkin Innovation Equity Quotient (TIEQ) of Tech Vendors
  6. NPS Versus Temkin Innovation Equity Quotient
  7. Temkin Forgiveness Ratings(TFR) of Tech Vendors
  8. NPS Versus Temkin Forgiveness Ratings
  9. Willing to Be A Reference For Tech Vendors
  10. NPS Versus Willingness To Act As A Reference

Download report for $695
Purchase includes Excel spreadsheet with data.
Download sample spreadsheet to see details. 
download net promoter score for tech vendors report

 

Note: See our 2016 NPS benchmark2015 NPS benchmark2014 NPS benchmark2013 NPS benchmark and 2012 NPS benchmark for tech vendors as well as our page full of NPS resources.

P.S. Net Promoter Score, Net Promoter, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Satmetrix Systems, and Fred Reichheld.

Report: Renovating Your Voice of the Customer Program

renovating your voice of the customer programWe just published a Temkin Group report, Renovating Your Voice of the Customer Program.

Here’s the executive summary:

Voice of the customer (VoC) programs are essential to any customer experience effort. In recent years, VoC efforts have continued to expand and support their organizations; however, going forward they will need to adapt to significant changes in data sources, technology, operational pressures, and consumer behavior. In this report, Temkin Group details how companies can propel their VoC programs into the future by:

  • Identifying Six Customer Insight Trends that will reshape VoC programs: 1) Deep Empathy, Not Stacks of Metrics; 2) Continuous Insights, Not Periodic Studies; 3) Customer Journeys, Not Isolated Interactions; 4) Useful Prescriptions, Not Past Descriptions; 5) Enterprise Intelligence, Not Customer Feedback; and 6) Mobile First, Not Mobile Responsive.
  • Sharing 30 examples that exemplify innovative VoC practices across each of the trends.
  • Helping companies lay the groundwork for VoC innovation with a description of how to drive change through three distinct stages.

For this report, we received submissions of innovative VoC practices from Confirmit, InMoment, Rant & Rave, Qualtrics, Verint, and Walker.

Download report for $195+
Buy Renovating your voice of the customer program report

Here are the best practices described in the report:

Innovative voice of the customer practices

Download report for $195+download renovating your voice of the customer program


Report Outline:

  • Voice of the Customer Programs Need an Overhaul
  • Six Trends That Will Reshape VoC and Customer Insights
  • Best Practices For Tapping Into VoC Trends
    • Trend #1: deep Empathy, Not Stacks of Metrics
    • Trend #2: Continuous Insights, Not Periodic Studies
    • Trend #3: Customer Journeys, Not Isolated Interactions
    • Trend #4: Useful Prescriptions, Not Past Descriptions
    • Trend #5: Enterprise Intelligence, Not Customer Feedback
    • Trend #6: Mobile First, Not Mobile Responsive
  • Introduce Innovation Throughout VoC Programs

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Growing Role of Technology and Insight Sources in VoC
  2. Vendor-Submitted Best Practices By Trend
  3. Vendor-Submitted Best Practices By Trend
  4. Vendor-Submitted Best Practices BY Trend
  5. Innovative VoC Practices Across the Six Customer Insight Trends
  6. Intuit Design for Delight (D4D)
  7. GE Healthcare: Adventure Series
  8. Petsmart: Collecting Non-Mobile Feedback Through Mobile
  9. Mobile Telecommunications: Explore Variation by Channel
  10. Ally Bank: Design Standardized Methods For Prioritizing Insights
  11. Using Text Analytics to Understand Satisfaction Scores
  12. Example of Condensed Survey Design
  13. Probe for Immediate Survey Follow-Up
  14. Example of Mobile-Friendly Alert for Employees
  15. Customer Insights Readiness Checklist
  16. Mobile Feedback Transforms the Six D’s of Voice of the Customer

Download report for $195+download renovating your voice of the customer program