Debriefing My Qualtrics X4 Experience

X4_ImageLast week I joined more than 10,000 XM enthusiasts at the Qualtrics X4 Summit in Salt Lake City. This was my fourth X4, and the first one since joining Qualtrics. I really enjoyed seeing old friends and meeting many new ones. We have some really awesome clients!

My head is still spinning from the amazing event. Over two days, we were treated to the most incredible line-up of speakers, including President Obama, Oprah, Sir Richard Branson, Ashton Kutcher, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver, and Imagine Dragons’ lead singer Dan Reynolds. Add to that an Imagine Dragons concert, skateboard exhibition by Tony Hawk and his friends, and a dance contest to support 5 for the Fight (including tWitch). And yes, there were also a bunch of fantastic industry speakers.

There were so many extraordinary experiential elements around the event, including the environment for my two speeches. One of my talks was in a very large open space where attendees listened through headsets and the other was in an informal setting that was part of a private lounge for senior leaders. (Note: I’ll write another post to share some of that content).

Here are some of my favorite X4 moments:

  • Oprah was just purely amazing and inspiring. She talked a lot about the importance of “intention,” having clarity of your personal purpose (I am totally bought into the power of purpose). Some other lessons from her include, “your legacy is every life you touch,”  “notice what you have, not what you don’t have, and you will recognize the abundance around you,” and you need to acknowledge and validate other people. Her closing question challenged all of us: How do you use your true self in service of the world? And, I’m still chuckling about her discussion with Ryan Smith about Barnaby.
  • President Obama was so chill. He looked calm and loose, which made it very entertaining. He discussed his approach for making difficult decisions: “setup a process to figure the thing out with facts, data, and reason.” He made sure that the people in his administration were there for the right reason; not personal gain, but achieving their common mission. He required everyone to have integrity at their core. One of my favorite moments was when Obama quoted from The Departed. He discussed a scene where Mark Wahlberg’s character is asked who are you? and answers “I’m the guy doing my job. You must be the other guy.” Obama said that his staff would often use the phrase “Don’t be the other guy.” He also left us with an important charge, “focus more on our common hopes, dreams, and values, not on the things that pull us apart, and we can accomplish great things.
  • Adam Silver really surprised me. I’m a big fan of his work with the NBA, and have seen him speak at the MIT Sports Analytics Conference. But I never knew he was such a data guy. He discussed XM, like a pro. He clearly articulated how the combination of SAP and Qualtrics would help the NBA. He even discussed X-and O-data!
  • Sir Richard Branson was truly authentic. He seems like a great person to work for. He discussed how you purposely help more and more people as you get successful, expanding the circles from yourself, to your family, to your community, to the world. He called the American holiday system “a total disgrace” for not allowing workers to have more time off.  Branson believes that “every day is a fantastic learning experience,” and he also believes in promoting from within and delegating. This is what he had to say about brand, “you are only as good as your reputation, and you will need to zealously protect it.” He will only get into a new business if employees will be really proud and customers will sing its praise.
  • Bill McDermott explained why SAP & Qualtrics makes so much sense. He described SAP as a company with ‘a great brand and a good heart.’ Not only is that the type of company I want to work for, but it’s also how I would love to be personally viewed by other people. McDermott labeled XM as “the ultimate category” for enterprise software. He summed up the acquisition with a quote from Jerry Maguire, “Qualtrics completes us.” You can see a lot of what he said in this really good article.
  • Qualtrics employees delivered awesome content. Ryan And Jared Smith did a great job sharing the XM vision and highlighting amazing new capabilities in our XM platform. I was really proud of all of the Qualtrics speakers that I was able to see. The overall storyline at the event was that organizations often fail because they get blindsided; they lack good instrumentation. In order to deliver breakthrough experiences, you need more XM instrumentation.
  • Our new offerings are incredible. We announced a crazy number of game-changing additions to the Qualtrics XM Platform. We’re using AI in many areas across the platform, including to analyze data and create automated alerts about potential problems and opportunities. And our new mobile experience is pretty cool as well. Here are links to some of the other announcements:

I’ll end this post with a shout out to our XM Breakout Artist Winners:

  • CX: American Express
  • EX: Coca-Cola
  • PX: Belkin
  • BX: Sofi
  • XM: L.L.Bean

The bottom line: X4 was amazing; I’m already looking forward to next year.

2019 XM Trends From Qualtrics Thought Leaders

This is the time of year for holiday cheer, family celebrations, and, of course, listings of annual trends!

To help me identify trends for 2019, I reached out to some of the many thought leaders across Qualtrics and asked them to share one or two of the top experience management (XM) trends they are expecting to see in the coming year.

It was a great exercise. We have some amazing people across Qualtrics who regularly help organizations master all aspects of XM: Customer Experience (CX), Employee Experience (EX), Brand Experience (BX), and Product Experience (PX). And the trends they shared highlight the enormous amount of learning and maturing that’s currently happening in the field of XM. For the sake of simplicity, we organized their trends into four broad categories:

  1. Humanizing through Technology
  2. Tailoring Insights for Action
  3. Expanding Predictive Analytics
  4. Authentically Living Brand Values

1) Humanizing through Technology

Companies are starting to recognize that their customers (and their employees!) are real human beings, with their own emotions, wants, needs, beliefs, and motivations. Companies are using technology and data to not only deepen this understanding, but also deliver more emotionally resonant experiences. Here are some trends from our experts:

  • Adaptive, Conversational Listening. “Survey” has a pejorative overlay in the common vernacular in the U.S. today. Customers are over-surveyed with surveys that benefit only the company and not the customer. We’ve come up with a way to change the survey to a conversation, whilst preserving methodological rigor around validity and repeatability. Our method seems simple but is built on a sophisticated process within Qualtrics. First, we identify the conversational aspects of the feedback request before we engage a customer. A conversation is a give and take, a social contract between two people (personas, in abstract) who are exchanging a number of responses that include emotions, meanings, motivations, and memories evoked by current, previous experiences and the cues of the conversation. We identify the main constructs that we are dealing with as part of this feedback strategy: the company, the Feedback Conversation and the Persona who represents the customer, and we adapt the feedback requests based on the customer response.  (Carol Haney, Head of Research & Data Science)
  • Make It Matter To Me. The advancement and application of artificial intelligence is already enabling more meaningful customer experiences. Whether it’s via chatbot, or a truly personalized experience, artificial intelligence has the potential to truly humanize endless reams of data. (Juliana Smith Holterhaus, Ph.D., Senior XM Scientist)
  • Quantify & Discuss Customer Emotions. Thanks to rapidly evolving technologies, in 2019, I expect to see more companies measuring and discussing customer emotions. Emotions play an essential role in how we make decisions and form judgments, and consequently, they significantly impact our experiences with and loyalty to different companies. And yet companies have historically ignored emotions – dismissing them as too squishy and unquantifiable. However, recent advances in technological capabilities – such as cloud storage, processing power, machine learning, AI, natural language processing, etc. – are allowing companies to start identifying and quantifying their customers’ emotions. For example, companies can now use speech or text analytics to automatically surface emotions during customer service conversations, and new analytics can infer customers’ emotions based on their digital body language (e.g. scrolling, clicking, hovering). Additionally, machine learning enables companies to uncover patterns in customers’ behaviors and preferences, allowing them to proactively address problems and personalize customers’ experiences. (Isabelle Zdatny, CCXP, Qualtrics XM Institute)
  • AI To boost Frontline Productivity. We are increasingly seeing more companies incorporate sophisticated technologies such as virtual agents to enable smarter self-service in order to rethink operational processes and deliver immediate gratification. Contrary to beliefs that virtual agents will start to replace agents in frontend operations, we actually expect AI to help drive adoption of virtual assistants to become the primary channel of self service, while saving effort and time for agents and increasing their overall productivity, whereby they can focus on being a source of revenue rather than be a cost-center by selecting and presenting the best possible solution to the customer when engaged in LIVE calls. But, the focus will need to be maintained on relying on mechanisms which can also distinguish when the customer is confused and can understand and distinguish based on that emotion to engage a live agent – so ultimately the experience is frictionless, yet effortless from all involved. (Arpana Luthra, Principal Consultant, CX Practice)
  • Augmented Reality Will Redefine XM. Technologies like augmented and virtual reality will be important in elevating overall experiences and improving decision making. These technologies will make shopping easy, convenient, attractive and certainly differentiated – enabling customers to touch, feel, discover and explore products to create an experiential environment giving them a realistic feeling of the product or service experience much before they make a purchase decision. This will require businesses to re-imagine their people, process, technological and service strategies while ensuring they continue to deliver to their brand promise, but do so more effectively. (Arpana Luthra, Principal Consultant, CX Practice)

My Take: Organizations will increasingly focus on the fundamental component of XM—human beings. It’s important to start with an understanding of how people think, feel, and act. How can organizations apply this knowledge? By applying the Human Conversational Model to all interactions, including the growing number of digital touch points.

2) Tailoring Insights For Action

While most companies are now fairly proficient at data accumulation, collecting data just for the sake of collecting data is not useful in and of itself. Companies must actually use these insights to drive customer- and employee-centric decisions across the entire organization. To do this, they need to be strategic about how they collect information, how they tailor the information to their separate audiences, and how they use that information to identify and act on improvement opportunities. Here are some trends from our experts:

  • Activating Managers’ Engagement Skills. More companies are recognizing that a strong culture and engaged employees are not a result of HR tactics, but on how effectively individual leaders and managers are connecting with employees. I’m seeing more companies putting time into helping managers understand their role in employee engagement and identifying and removing time-consuming administrative tasks that get in the way of managers supporting, coaching, and recognizing employees every day. Companies are also working on improving the feedback managers get so that it enables managers to have more productive conversations with their employees about what’s working and not working on the job. (Aimee Lucas, CCXP, Qualtrics XM Institute)
  • From Survey To Strategy. I’m beginning to see organizations ask how the annual engagement survey can best fit into their overall people strategy. Leaders are taking an interest in linking survey results to business outcomes, aligning surveys along multiple points in the employee journey, taking action that will impact the business both immediately and 3-5 years from now. Surveying is no longer an annual look backward, but a strategic tool in moving forward. These conversations are exciting for both the client and Qualtrics. (Kara Laine, XM Scientist)
  • High Frequency Feedback Isn’t Helping. We have had several customers this year pull back from a monthly employee survey strategy to something Quarterly or even Semi-Annually. Their manager report not having the ability to action it before the next survey goes out and they are overwhelmed by the frequency. We find that instead our successful customers are working to connect with employees at meaningful touch-points, such as during onboarding or on a work anniversary, rather than focusing on frequency. (Austin Nilsson, EX Delivery Services Manager)

My Take: As I wrote in a post earlier this year, the future of VoC is insight & action, not feedback. Companies are increasingly recognizing that they need to drive four different action loops. This requires them to tailor insights to fuel different decision-making processes across an organization. That’s why Qualtrics is so committed to helping our customers deliver role-specific insights.

3) Expanding Predictive Analytics

Customers and employees increasingly expect companies recognize them as individuals, anticipate their needs, and proactively address their concerns. To meet these rising expectations, companies are using powerful analytics engines to combine rich customer and employee feedback with reams of CRM and operational data, surface meaningful patterns within that data, and then generate predictive models that allow for proactive, personalized experiences. Here are some trends from our experts:

  • Hyper-Contextualized, Not Personalized. A positive, consistent experience has long become a table stake. Today’s customers want organizations to respect their time. A good product at a competitive price is no longer the basis for differentiation. Truly customer-centric organizations will increasingly leverage data-driven analytics to spot customers’ buying patterns, behaviors across channels and touch points to design experiences and content, at a time customers want it and deliver them proactively rather than reactively. Customers will increasingly look for a unique, customized experience that is memorable and reminiscent of a personal relationship. There will likely be a rise in teams and knowledge centers focused on identifying the experience along these personalized journeys. Closely tied will be the importance of measuring customer emotions and understanding how they feel in the moment because customers who have a negative experience during a brand interaction are more likely not to forgive that company. We expect analytics to not only empower brands to personalize experiences, but also enable them to identify and prevent issues before they would happen, so they can now shift resources not to problem solve but to get ahead of them. (Arpana Luthra, Principal Consultant, CX Practice)
  • People Analytics. People analytics involves deriving insights from employee data and advanced analytics to make talent management decisions to drive revenue and growth. Over 70% of companies now consider people analytics a high priority, but only 10% believe they have a good understanding of which talent dimensions drive performance in their organizations. People analytics may be leveraged alongside data captured at every employee touchpoint to develop algorithmic selection systems, dynamic workforce planning models, and social networks informing organizational silos and influence between and within teams – to name a few possibilities. (Brandon Riggs, EX Internal Program Lead)

My Take: Historically, insights have been used to describe what has happened in the past. While this retrospective provides value, the ultimate objective is to use insights to prescribe best actions for the future. As predictive analytics becomes more accessible and companies blend together X- and O-Data, we’ll see a surge in predictive recommendations. Qualtrics is putting a lot of energy into making these advance analytics much more accessible to business users.

4) Authentically Living Brand Values

People want to interact with organizations whose policies and practices align with their personal principles, ideals, and attitudes. Companies can build trust and emotionally engage both their customers and employees by authentically championing social causes and demonstrating that they share the same values as their target customer segments. Here are some trends from our experts:

  • Merging Inclusivity And CX. We’ve seen multiple news articles over the past year surrounding how companies can create better online experiences for customers with disabilities. One of my favorite CX-related stories from 2018 was on the work of the Hearing and Speech Agency in Baltimore, MD. The organization is working with D.C. area restaurants to train workers on how to understand and create enjoyable experiences for customers with speech disabilities and disorders. Starbucks also opened its first U.S. sign language store in Washington, DC this past year. (Stephanie Thum, CCXP Chief Advisor, Federal Customer Experience)
  • Maturing Of Customer Journey Mapping. Customer journey maps will sustain their momentum as a popular tool to diagnose and design customer experiences. Successful journey mapping companies avoid the common of mistake of assuming the map itself is the “finish line” but rather bring cross-functional subject matter experts together who use the map’s findings to take action around the key moments of truth that deliver on an organization’s brand promises. In 2019, more companies will use journey maps to highlight the emotional impact of the experience as a way to raise empathy for customers among employees, regardless of their roles. Companies will also shift from using maps solely to capture the current state experience and begin to use them to keep the broader journey in mind while innovating future-state customer interactions. (Aimee Lucas, CCXP, Qualtrics XM Institute)
  • Fusing The Concepts Of Ethics And BX. Customers oftentimes look to online reviews and ratings to make decisions, anticipating or expecting experiences that may be based on those reviews and ratings. But what about when reviewers have been compensated to write positive reviews, incentivized to do so with a discount on a future purchase, or reviews are just plain fake? Similarly, what are the CX ethical implications of score begging, when auto dealerships, for example, beg for 10s on a survey, rather than allow customers to provide an honest review that would then possibly trickle out via marketing to other, future customers? How do we consider and think about these things when creating or honestly evaluating the experience customers are having with brands? (Stephanie Thum, CCXP Chief Advisor, Federal Customer Experience)

My Take: For an organization to optimize its CX, BX, PX, and BX efforts, it must have a deep understanding of its core values. Without this clarity around a true north, it’s nearly impossible to align priorities across an organization. We’ve seen companies live their values by translating customer promises into employee actions —and we expect to see even more of this activity going forward. I recently discussed how Starbucks should have used this approach for training after its recent issues.

The bottom line: 2019 will be an exciting year for XM!

What’s All This About X- And O-Data?

1811_XODataYou might have heard Qualtrics discussing X-data (experience data) and O-data (operational data), and wondered, should we care? The answer is yes, and here’s why.

Let’s start with a basic premise that no individual experience exists in a vacuum. People form their opinions about any experience based on a collection of different factors. The more we can understand those factors, the better we can extrapolate the insights about a single personal experience to form a deeper understanding about other people’s experiences.

Now to my discussion of Xs and Os, starting with customer experience (CX)…

Let’s say that your company has this data:

  • X-Data: NPS responses
  • O-Data: Customer product ownership and support history.

With X-data, you can calculate an NPS for the customers who responded. You can also dig into their feedback, and hopefully understand what’s causing promoters and what’s causing detractors.

That’s extremely valuable, but it only tells you what’s going on with the people who happened to respond to the survey.

By combining O-data with your X-data you can examine (especially through predictive analytics) what types of products and service interactions lead to promoters and detractors, and use this data to calculate the NPS for large portions of your customer base–—even for customers who never responded to a survey.

It could be that ownership of a certain version of a product tied together with a specific type of customer service problem is highly likely to create detractors. You can identify all the customers with that profile and take proactive measures to correct the issues — even though they may never have complained.

Result: More loyal customers and more targeted use of your resources.

This works across all areas, even with employee experience (EX). Let’s assume you have this data:

  • X-Data: Employee satisfaction study
  • O-Data: Employee tenure, promotion history, most recent performance rating

With X-data, you can determine how employees feel about their next steps at the company. You can also dig into their feedback, and hopefully understand what’s causing higher vs. lower levels of career satisfaction.

By combining O-data with your X-data you can examine what influence tenure, promotion history, and performance may have on satisfaction, and use this data to identify segments of employees to invite to participate in a high-potential development program.

Result: More high-performing workforce because you’re investing in the right employees.

Hopefully you can see how the combination of X- and O-data can increase your CX and EX insights. The same dynamic also holds true for brand experience (BX) and product experience (PX). By combining and analyzing the different types of data, you can use feedback from a few people to build an understanding of many, many more. This allows you to better prioritize investments, while making more targeted and impactful changes.

The bottom line: X- and O-data together provides an analytics goldmine.

Starbucks Training Should Focus on Broken Brand Promises

Last week, Starbucks closed all of its stores for racial sensitivity training after an incident in April when two black men were arrested at a Philadelphia store.

My Take: Starbucks training was well intentioned, but misguided.

As I said in my previous post, it’s great that Starbucks’ leaders took such swift and decisive action to condemn the incident. So what’s wrong with Starbucks doing sensitivity training? Nothing. It doesn’t hurt, but it also doesn’t address the right long-term problem.

Employees don’t change who they are when they go to work. They’re the same people before and after their shift as they are when they’re wearing green aprons. Rather than trying to change who employees are as people (which has little chance of lasting success), Starbucks needs to focus on how those employees view their role when they are at work.

That’s why Starbucks should focus its training on its brand values, not on racial sensitivity.

One of our Four CX Core Competencies is Compelling Brand Values. Companies need to use their brand as a blueprint for how they treat customers. To do that, they must focus on the promises that they make to customers through three steps:

  1. Make Promises. Ensure promises are clearly and explicitly defined.
  2. Embrace Promises: Help employees understand their critical role in delivering on the promises.
  3. Keep Promises: Hold the organization accountable to fulfilling the promises.

Temkin Group hasn’t worked directly with Starbucks, but if we did, we would have encouraged the leadership to create a set of customer promises that looked something like this:

We (Starbucks) promise to act in a way that our customers consistently:

  • Feel Welcomed. We will treat everyone who comes into one of our stores as our guest, whether they’re buying food or just hanging out.
  • Feel Sustained. We will provide wholesome food and beverages that are made with the freshest, healthiest ingredients.
  • Feel Inspired. We will provide an environment where our customers can comfortably meet and talk to others, dream big thoughts, or just relax.
  • Feel Heard: We will relish feedback from our customers, and view it as an opportunity to celebrate or improve.
  • Feel Valued. We will show our appreciate for every customer.

The training should have been about embracing & keeping these type of customer promises. Employees should have gone over multiple scenarios (including the one that happened in Philadelphia) and discussed how employees had either kept or broken those promises. Employees should also have discussed things that they can do to better keep the promises.

In other words, even racially insensitive employees should understand that the incident was unacceptable because it breaks one of Starbucks’ brand promises.

Starbucks leaders can’t treat this as a training issue, it’s a cultural issue. As we’ve discussed, culture is how people think, believe, and act. Starbucks leaders must do more than deploy a bunch of training if they expect to see any lasting change.

This is not just an issue at Starbucks. Very few companies actively help their employees embrace their brand values, as you can see in this data from the State of CX Management, 2018.

Organizations shouldn’t hire people who are racially insensitive and try to train them not to be. They should train employees as part of an overall approach that helps them embrace and keep their customer promises.

The bottom line: Don’t undo employees’ upbringing, get them to embrace your brand values.

P.S. Racial insensitivity is clearly a problem in our society. This is part of why we have made 2018, The Year of Humanity. Please join Temkin Group in our efforts to try and improve humanity!

 

Making AI Customer-Centric

Making AI Customer-Centric (Temkin Group Report)Temkin Group just published a new report, Making AI Customer-Centric. Here’s the executive summary:

The use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) – often in the form of chatbots and intelligent virtual assistants – is becoming more widespread in customer experience. However, despite its prevalence, few companies are employing AI in the right scenarios or using it to its fullest potential. In this report, Temkin Group creates a model and shares best practices for AI-Driven Interfaces (AIDI), which we define as digital interactions with customers that are being directly manipulated by machine learning algorithms.

Download report for $195
Purchase and download Temkin Group report: Making AI Customer-Centric

To successfully deploy customer-centric AI, companies need to:

  • Integrate the elements of the Human Conversational Model into the design of AIDI.
  • Bring together Five Ingredients: Conversational Design, Targeted Use Cases, Optimized Data Aggregation, Responsive AI Engine, and Continuous Tuning.
  • Determine Organizational AI Readiness before deployment by tying AI to business strategy, auditing data sources, assessing employee skills, and planning for agent/AIDI interactions.

Five Ingredients of Customer-Centric AI

Download report for $195
Purchase and download Temkin Group report: Making AI Customer-Centric


Report Outline:

  • Current AI Efforts Miss the Mark
  • Five Ingredients For Customer-Centric AI
    • Ingredient #1: Conversational Design
    • Ingredient #2: Targeted Use Cases
    • Ingredient #3: Optimized Data Aggregation
    • Ingredient #4: Responsive AI Engine
    • Ingredient #5: Continuous Tuning
  • Determine Organizational AI Readiness

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Artificial Intelligence Terminology
  2. Five Ingredients for Customer-Centric AI
  3. The HumanConversational Model
  4. American Express Platinum: Handoff to live agent
  5. Organizational Personality
  6. Organizational Personality: U.S. Army’s SGT STAR
  7. Attributes of Good Initial AI Use Cases
  8. How AI Supports Contact Center Agents
  9. NorthFace: Identify Intent in the Moment
  10. Questions For Determining Organizational AI Readiness
  11. Changing Responsibilities for AI Development

Download report for $195
Purchase and download Temkin Group report: Making AI Customer-Centric

Report: Lessons in CX Excellence, 2018

Download Temkin Group research report, Lessons in Customer Experience Excellence, 2018We just published a Temkin Group report, Lessons in CX Excellence, 2018. The report provides insights from six winners in the Temkin Group’s 2017 CX Excellence Awards. The report, which has more than 70 pages of content, includes an appendix with the finalists’ nomination forms. This report has rich insights about both B2B and B2C customer experience.

Here’s the executive summary:

This past November, we named six organizations the winners of Temkin Group’s 2017 Customer Experience Excellence Award – AARP, Allianz Worldwide Partners, Century Support Services, Nurse Next Door Home Care Services, Reliant, and Sage. This report:

  • Highlights specific examples of how these companies’ customer experience (CX) efforts have created value for both their customers and for their businesses.
  • Describes winners’ best practices across the four customer experience competencies: purposeful leadership, compelling brand values, employee engagement, and customer connectedness.
  • Includes all of the winners’ detailed nomination forms to help you collect examples and ideas to apply to your own CX efforts.

Download report for $195
Purchase and download Temkin Group research report, Lessons in Customer Experience Excellence, 2018

Here are some highlights from the winners: Read More …

Report: Infusing Culture Throughout The New Employee Journey

Infusing culture throughout the new employee journey reportWe just published a Temkin Group report, Infusing Culture Throughout The New Employee Journey.

Here’s the executive summary:

A company’s culture reflects the attitudes and behaviors of its employees and influences almost every aspect of the employee journey and experience. However, despite its importance, many companies fail to orient new employees to their culture during onboarding. Rather than helping new hires form long-term connections with the organization and its values, companies often use this time to teach new hires about the organization’s processes. Companies instead should use their culture as a focal point during recruiting, hiring, and onboarding and then continue to emphasize it as employees acclimate to their roles. This report:

  • Explores how companies can align new employees with their culture.
  • Describes how companies can infuse culture throughout the four stages of the new hire journey: Establish Cultural Fit, Set Behavioral Expectations, Reinforce Positive Performance, and Prioritize Sustaining Culture.
  • Shares examples of best practices from a number of companies, including Adobe, Crowe Horwath, LexisNexis, Oxford Properties, Touchpoint Support Services, and Safelite Autoglass.
  • Provides a checklist companies can use to execute their culture-focused onboarding program effectively.

Download report for $195+
Buy report

Here are the best practices described in the report:infuse culture throughout the four stages of the new hire journey

Download report for $195+buy infusing culture report


Report Outline:

  • New Employees Need More Corporate Cultural Onboarding
    • New Hire Programs Fall Short on Culture
  • Companies Should Infuse Culture Across the Entire New Hire Journey
    • Stage 1: Establish Cultural Fit
    • Stage 2: Set Behavioral Expectations
    • Stage 3: Reinforce Positive Performance
    • Stage 4: Prioritize Sustaining Culture
  • The Path Towards A Culture-Focused Onboarding Program
    • Immediate, Near-term, and Long-term actions

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. How to Shape Culture by Impacting How Employees Think, Believe, and Act
  2. Six Areas of Culture Focus
  3. Infuse Culture Throughout the Four Stages of the New Hire Journey
  4. Examples of Culture-Focused Onboarding Across the Four Stages of the New Hire Journey
  5. LexisNexis Summer Intern Program
  6. The Oxford Commitment
  7. Safelite AutoGlass Customer Driven Model
  8. Touchpoint Services Keeps Employees Learning Through Daily LineUp Meetings
  9. Recommendations for Designing an Effective Employee Recognition Program
  10. Select TouchPoint Supportive Services Manager Training
  11. Channels for Listening to Employee Feedback
  12. Actions to Take to Strengthen Company Culture

Download report for $195+buy infusing culture report

The Human Conversational Model (Infographic)

In the report, Humanizing Digital Interactions, we decoded successful person-to-person interactions as a step in developing the Human Conversational Model. It’s the foundation for building compelling interactions with customers. This infographic provides an overview of the model and shows how to apply it to your digital efforts.

Foundations for humanizing customer interactionsYou can download the infographic in several forms:

The Four CX Core Competencies (Infographic)

Hopefully you’ve read our FREE report, The Four CX Core Competencies. It outlines the blueprint to building a customer-centric organization. We’ve created this infographic to showcase the competencies:

  1. Purposeful Leadership: Operate consistently with a clear set of values.
  2. Compelling Brand Values: Deliver on your brand promises to customers.
  3. Employee Engagement: Align employees with the goals of the organization.
  4. Customer Connectedness: Infuse customer insight across the organization.

four customer experience core competencies

You can also download an 18″ x 24″ poster version.

CX Competency: Compelling Brand Values (Video)

Temkin Group has found that the only path to sustainable customer experience differentiation is to build a customer-centric culture. How? By mastering Four Customer Experience Core Competencies.

This video provides an overview of one of those competencies, Compelling Brand Values, where the goal is to deliver on your brand promises to customers.

Here Are Three Steps to Compelling Brand Values:

compelling brand values


CX Sparks: Guides For Stimulating Customer Experience DiscussionsThis video is a great introduction to a discussion with your team. That’s why we’ve created a CX Sparks guide that you can download and use to lead a stimulating discussion.

Report: The State of CX Management, 2017

The state of customer experience management reportWe just published a Temkin Group report, The State of CX Management, 2017.

For the eighth straight year, Temkin Group has evaluated the state of Customer Experience (CX) management at large companies. It includes a lot of details about customer experience within large organizations and examines their effectiveness across Temkin Group’s Four CX Core Competencies: Purposeful Leadership, Compelling Brand Values, Employee Engagement, and Customer Connectedness.

When we analyzed their efforts and their progress this year, we found that:

  • While only 8% of companies view themselves as industry leaders in CX today, 55% aspire to be leaders within three years.
  • A majority of companies have a CX executive in charge of their efforts and a central team who coordinates significant CX activities. The median number of CX staff members falls between 11 and 15 full-time professionals.
  • Companies find significant value in working with voice of the customer vendors, and the percentage of companies who get value out of this relationship has been steadily increasing.
  • We used Temkin Group’s CX Competency and Maturity Assessment, which evaluates four CX competencies­ (Purposeful Leadership, Compelling Brand Values, Employee Engagement, and Customer Connectedness) to benchmark the maturity of companies’ CX efforts and found that only 10% of companies have reached the highest two levels of customer experience, while 59% still find themselves in the lowest two stages.
  • When we compared CX leaders with CX laggards, we discovered that the leaders enjoy stronger financial results, are more likely to have senior executives leading company-wide CX efforts, employ more full-time CX employees, use more experience design agencies, and feel more supported by senior leaders.
  • This report also includes an assessment that companies can use to benchmark their CX efforts and capabilities.

Download report for $195
buy the state of customer experience management report

Here are the results from Temkin Group’s CX Competency & Maturity Assessment:

results from customer experience competency and maturity assessment

Download report for $195
download the state of customer experience management


Report Outline:

  • Customer Experience Management Within Large Firms
  • Assessing The Four Customer Experience Core Competencies
  • Comparing CX Leaders and CX Laggards
  • Assess and Improve Your CX Competencies

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Customer Experience Today and Future Ambitions
  2. Customer Experience Leadership and Coordination
  3. Customer Experience Coordination and Staffing
  4. Customer Experience Team Effectiveness
  5. Customer Experience Tools and Services
  6. Customer Experience Tools and Services (2015 to 2017)
  7. Quality of Customer Experience Across Different Channels
  8. Quality of Customer Experience Across Different Channels (2015 to 2017)
  9. Obstacles to Customer Experience Success
  10. The Four Customer Experience Core Competencies
  11. Temkin Group Customer Experience Competency Assessment
  12. Results From Temkin Group’s Customer Experience Competency and Maturity Assessment
  13. Customer Experience Maturity and Competency Based on CX Executive Leadership
  14. Results From Temkin Group’s Customer Experience Competency and Maturity Assessment(2010 to 2017)
  15. Most Frequently Practiced Customer Experience Competency Attributes
  16. Least Frequently Practiced Customer Experience Competency Attributes
  17. Customer Experience Competency Attributes that Improved and Declined Between 2016 to 2017
  18. Overview: CX Competency Leaders Versus CX Competency Laggards
  19. Effectiveness of CX Teams, CX Leaders Versus CX Laggards
  20. Use of CX Tools and Services, CX Leaders Versus CX Laggards
  21. Effectiveness of CX Tools and Services, CX Leaders Versus CX Laggards
  22. Quality of Customer Experience Across Different Channels, CX Leaders Versus CX Laggards
  23. Obstacles to CX Success, CX Leaders Versus CX Laggards
  24. Executive Priorities, CX Leaders Versus CX Laggards
  25. Percentiles of Results From Temkin Group’s CX Competency and Maturity Assessment

Download report for $195
download the state of customer experience management

Report: The Four Customer Experience Core Competencies (Free)

the four customer experience core competenciesIf you are only going to read only one thing about customer experience, then this report is it. It’s the blueprint for building a customer-centric organization… and it’s free.

We just published a Temkin Group report, The Four CX Core Competencies. This blueprint to building a customer-centric organization is an update to our groundbreaking research that was originally published in 2010 and updated in 2013.

Temkin Group has conducted multiple large-scale studies demonstrating that customer experience (CX) is highly correlated with loyalty across many different industries, in both business-to-consumer and business-to-business environments. When customers have a good experience with a company, they are more likely to repurchase from the company, try its new offerings, and recommend it to others.

While many companies try to improve their CX by making superficial changes, Temkin Group has found that the only path to lasting differentiation and increased loyalty is to build a customer-centric culture. Temkin Group has studied hundreds of companies to uncover the difference between CX leaders and their less successful peers, and has identified four CX competencies that companies must master if they wish to build and sustain CX differentiation:

  1. Purposeful Leadership: Operate consistently with a clear set of values. (see video)
  2. Compelling Brand Values: Deliver on your brand promises to customers. (see video)
  3. Employee Engagement: Align employees with the goals of the organization. (see video)
  4. Customer Connectedness: Infuse customer insight across the organization. (see video)

Download report for FREE
download the four customer experience core competencies

This whiteboard video describes the Four CX Core Competencies:

Here’s an infograhic with the best practices described in the report:the four customer experience core competencies

Download report for FREE
download the four customer experience core competencies


Report Outline:

  • Customer Experience: The Case For A New Approach
  • The Customer Experience Core Competencies
    • Purposeful Leadership: Operate with Clear and Consistent Values
    • Compelling Brand Values: Deliver on Your Brand Promises to Customers
    • Employee Engagement: Align Employees with Goals of the Organization
    • Customer Connectedness: Infuse Customer Insight Across the Organization
  • The Journey to Customer Experience Maturity
  • Assessing Your Customer Experience Competency

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Customer Experience Correlates To Loyalty
  2. The Four Customer Experience Core Competencies
  3. Strategies For The Four CX Core Competencies
  4. Characteristics of Strong Brand Promises
  5. Employee Engagement Virtuous Cycle
  6. Six D’s of a Successful Voice of the Customer Program
  7. Operationalize Critical Fixes: Four Closed Loops For Taking Action
  8. Design Personas
  9. Example of a Customer Journey Map
  10. The Customer Journey Mapping Pyramid
  11. Strategies For Designing Experiences Based on Human Behaviors and Biases
  12. Six Stages of Customer Experience Maturity
  13. Temkin Group’s Customer Experience Competency and Maturity Assessment

Download report for FREE
download the four customer experience core competencies

Report: Humanizing Digital Interactions

humanizing digital interactionsWe just published a Temkin Group report, Humanizing Digital Interactions.

Emotions play an integral role in how customers make decisions and form judgments. This means that how a customer feels about an interaction with a company has an enormous impact on his or her loyalty to that company. However, companies tend to ignore customer emotions, especially during digital interactions, which is problematic as customers are increasingly interacting with companies online. This report focuses on humanizing digital interactions by replicating the elements of strong human conversations.

Here are some highlights:

  • We developed The Human Conversational Model, which is made up of seven elements – Intent Decoding, Contextual Framing, Empathetic Agility, Supportive Feedback, Basic Manners, Self-Awareness, and Emotional Reflection.
  • We share over 35 examples of best practices from companies that are designing digital experiences across the seven elements of The Human Conversational Model.
  • We demonstrate how you could apply The Human Conversational Model to three types of digital activities: opening a new bank account online, purchasing a pair of shoes through an app, and getting technical support online.

Download report for $195
buy humanizing digital interactions report

A gratifying conversation requires two processes:

  • Cooperative Interface. Each participant is required to collaborate with her partner to achieve the shared goal of the conversation – be that casually catching up, gathering information, sharing knowledge, etc. This is the part of the model that a conversational partner sees and responds to, and it consists of five elements: contextual framing, intent decoding, empathetic agility, supportive feedback, and basic manners.
  • Background Mindfulness. This portion of the model is not observable within what would normally be considered the scope of the conservation as it pertains to what happens internally within person. Each participant has a pre-existing notion of who he is as an individual (self-awareness) and throughout the course of the conversation, learns about how he affects other people (emotional reflection). Though not directly observable, “background mindfulness” informs the way in which each participant communicates with his current and future partners.

Here’s an overview of the Human Conversation Model along with best practices we highlight in the report:

human conversation model for digital interactions

Download report for $195
download humanizing digital interactions


Report Outline:

  • Emotion in Digital Experiences
    • Digital Interactions Need an Emotional Makeover
  • Introducing The Human Conversational Model
    • The Seven Elements of The Human Conversational Model
  • Applying The Human Conversational Modelto Digital Interactions
    • Intent Decoding
    • Contextual Framing
    • Empathetic Agility
    • Supportive Feedback
    • Basic Manners
    • Self-Awareness
    • Emotional Reflection
  • Applying The Human Conversational Model

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. The Three Components of a Customer’s Experience
  2. Impact of Success,Effort, and Emotionon Loyalty
  3. The Human Conversational Model
  4. Best Practices Across The Human Conversational Model
  5. Amazon: Remember previous interactions
  6. NorthFace: Ask Questions
  7. HomeAdvisor: Group together like-minded customers
  8. Regions Bank: Modulate tone
  9. Hilton: Use chat
  10. Types of Digital Body Language
  11. Virgin Atlantic and MusicMagpie: Monitor digital body language
  12. TELUS: Make it easy to reach a human
  13. Moven: Adjust communication style
  14. HomeAdvisor: Use loading animation to indicate delays
  15. MailChimp: Use microcopy
  16. Walgreens: Design for mental models
  17. Don’t Interrupt
  18. USAA: Make Information Easily Digestible
  19. California State Lottery: Core brand emotions
  20. Organizational Personality
  21. Moven: Incorporate Emotions Into CJM
  22. Applying The Human Conversational Model

Download report for $195
download humanizing digital interactions

Winners: 2017 CX Vendor Excellence Awards

Congratulations!

Temkin Group announces the winners of its 2017 Customer Experience Vendor Excellence Awards:

Clarabridge, Medallia, Qualtrics, Rant & Rave, and Root.

 

Here are excerpts from the winners’ submissions:

  • Clarabridge’s CX Suite helps companies understand and manage the customer experience. Customer feedback is taken in and analyzed, using Clarabridge’s advanced text analytics and sentiment analysis capabilities. The meaning of the text is analyzed, and the underlying root causes of each trend, complaint, and compliment is identified.
  • Medallia strives to be a single source of truth across all customer touchpoints and to make real-time customer feedback available to employees across the organization. Medallia’s core differentiation lies in our ability to drive thousands of active users to our application rather than depending on centralized CX teams to interpret customer feedback and share periodic reports.
  • Qualtrics’ XM Platform™ provides human-factor data–the beliefs, emotions, and sentiments that tell you “why” things are happening. The predictive intelligence layer within the platform allows companies to not only respond to the experiences they have delivered in the past, but also predict how changes will influence customer satisfaction in the future.
  • Rant & Rave helps businesses profit from customer sentiment, turning customers into Ravers by reacting and responding to their emotions and feelings in realtime. Whilst traditional CX vendors continue to rely on the collation and reporting of feedback through lengthy surveys and market research, we provide our clients with a disruptive engagement model, which delivers industry-leading response rates.
  • Root Inc.’s Customers for Life process includes defining a customer-first culture at the leader level, empowering managers to make customer-focused decisions, and providing the front line with coaching and tools to deliver an authentic customer experience. This approach engages employees at every level so they can internalize their specific role in driving the customer experience and how they impact big-picture outcomes.

Below are the first two sections from the winners’ nomination forms, Company Overview and Make The CaseRead More …

Report: Engaging A Tethered Workforce

1701_engagingatetheredworkforce_coverWe just published a Temkin Group report, Engaging A Tethered Workforce.  Here’s the executive summary:

Companies across a number of industries create and deliver customer experiences (CX) through a combination of traditional employees and other workers who they do not directly control – such as contractors or employees of channel partners or outsourcing partners. Despite not being directly employed by the company, these other workers – who make up what Temkin Group calls a “tethered workforce” – still play a critical role in delivering experiences that represent the company’s brand. However, tethered workers differ from typical full-time, corporate employees in ways that pose challenges to brands’ efforts to align these workers with their customer experience goals and objectives. In this report, we examine how brands are tapping into these tethered employees. Here are some highlights:

  • Companies must manage three connections: 1) Between themselves and their partners that employ the tethered workers, 2) Between their partners and the tethered employees, and 3) Between themselves and the tethered workers.
  • We share over 30 examples of best practices from across Temkin Group’s Five I’s of Employee Engagement: Inform, Inspire, Instruct, Involve, and Incent.
  • We offer brands a blueprint for engaging tethered workers with key things to think about across the three connections of tethered workforces.

Download report for $195BuyDownload3

Here are the 17 best practices described in the report:

1701_bestpracticesforengagingtetheredworkers

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3


Report Outline:

  • Delivering Experiences Through Non-Employees Is Challenging
  • Brands and Their Partners Need to Engage Tethered Workers
    • Brand and Channel or Outsourcing Partner: Collaborate for Success
    • Partner and Tethered Workers: Balance Interests
    • Brand and Tethered Workers: Forge Attachment
  • A Blueprint for Engaging Tethered Workers

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. How Tethered Workers’ Characteristics Impact the Customer Experience
  2. Engaged Employees Are Valuable Assets
  3. Employee Engagement Virtuous Cycle
  4. How Characteristics of tethered Workers Can Be Mitigated by the Five I’s of Employee Engagement
  5. Three Key Connections of Tethered Workforces
  6. 17 Practices for Engaging Tethered Workers
  7. How Partner CX Advocacy Programs Can Help
  8. Best Practices for Partners to Balance Interests
  9. Select TouchPoint Support Services Manager Training
  10. Channels for Listening to the Voice of the Employee
  11. The Oxford Commitment
  12. Oxford Properties’ Dialogue Series
  13. Recommendations for Designing an Effective Employee Recognition Program
  14. Blueprint for Engaging Tethered Workers

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3