Report: The State of CX Metrics, 2016

1612_stateofcxmetrics2016_coverWe published a Temkin Group report, The State of CX Metrics, 2016. This is the sixth year of this study that examines the CX metrics efforts within large companies. Here’s the executive summary:

Temkin Group surveyed 183 companies to learn about how they use customer experience (CX) metrics and then compared their answers with similar studies we’ve conducted every year since 2011. We found that the most commonly used metrics continue to be likelihood-to-recommend and satisfaction, while the most successful metric is transactional interaction satisfaction. Only 10% of companies regularly consider the effect of CX metrics when they make day-to-day decisions. The top two problems companies face are limited visibility of CX metrics and the lack of taking action on metrics. Companies are best at measuring customer service and phone-based experiences and are worst at measuring the experiences of prospects and customers who defect. We also had companies complete Temkin Group’s CX Metrics Program Assessment, which examines four characteristics of a metrics program: consistent (does the company use common CX metrics across the organization?), impactful (do the CX metrics inform important decisions?), integrated (are trade-offs made between CX and financial metrics?), and continuous (do leaders regularly examine the CX metrics?). Only 11% of respondents received at least a “good” overall rating in this assessment, and companies earned the lowest average rating in integrated. Companies with stronger CX metrics programs deliver better customer experience and use more effort and likelihood-to-repurchase metrics.

See the State of CX Metrics studies from 2011, 201220132014, and 2015.

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Here are the results form our CX Metrics Competency & Maturity Assessment (one of 22 graphics in the report):

1612_cxmetricsmaturity

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Report: State of Voice of the Customer Programs, 2016

1610_stateofvocprograms2016_coverWe published a Temkin Group report, State of Voice of the Customer Programs, 2016. This is the sixth year that we’ve benchmarked the competency & maturity of voice of the customer programs within large organization. Here’s the executive summary:

For the sixth straight year, Temkin Group has benchmarked the competency and maturity levels of voice of the customer (VoC) programs within large organizations. We found that while most companies think that their VoC efforts are successful, less than one-third of companies actually consider themselves good at reviewing implications that cut across the organization. Respondents think that in the future, the most important source of insights will be customer interaction history and the least important source will be multiple-choice questions. And although respondents believe that technology will play an increasingly important role in their VoC efforts, they also cite “integration across systems” as the biggest obstacle to their VoC success, and this concern has only grown in the past year. In addition to asking questions about their VoC program, we also had respondents complete Temkin Group’s VoC Competency and Maturity Assessment, which examines capabilities across what we call the “Six Ds”: Detect, Disseminate, Diagnose, Discuss, Design, and Deploy. Only 16% of companies have reached the two highest levels of VoC maturity, while 43% remain in the bottom two levels. When we compared higher-scoring VoC programs with lower-scoring programs, we found that companies with mature programs are more successful, they focus more on analytics, and they have more full-time staff, more strongly coordinated efforts, and more involved senior executives.

See the State of VoC reports from 2010201120132014, and 2015.

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Here are the results from Temkin Group’s VoC Competency & Maturity Assessment:

1610_vocmaturity

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Data Snapshot: Social Media Benchmark, 2016

1607_DS_SocialMediaBenchmark2016_COVERTemkin Group just published a data snapshot, Social Media Benchmark, 2016. This annual research effort shows how consumer use of social media sites on both computers and mobile phones are changing. Here’s a description of the data snapshot:

In January 2016, we surveyed 10,000 U.S. consumers about how frequently they use social media on their computers and mobile phones, and we then compared these usage rates to analogous data we collected in January 2012, January 2013, January 2014, & January 2015. This analysis looks at the frequency with which consumers in different age groups use computers and mobile phones to access Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, Tumblr, and third-party rating sites.

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The data snapshot has 13 graphics with data. Here’s a portion of one of the graphics:.

1607_DailySocialMediaComputersMobile

Here are a some additional findings from the research:

  • Daily use of Twitter, Facebook, and Pinterest on computers and mobile phones grew by 2 or more percentage points since last year. Tumblr grew 2 points on mobile phones.
  • All age groups of consumers under 45-years-old less frequently visited company Facebook pages on computers.
  • LinkedIn grew the most with 18- to 24-year-olds on computers, and 45- to 54-year-olds on mobile phones.
  • In most cases, mobile usage is strongest with 18- to 24-year-olds.
  • 18- to 24-year-olds had the largest drop in Facebook use, on both computers and mobile phones.
  • 45- to 54-year-olds had the largest jump in daily Facebook use, on both computers and mobile phones.
  • 25- to 34-year-olds are the largest daily users of almost all social media, on computers and mobile phone.
  • 18- to 24-year-olds are the largest daily users of Tumblr.

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Report: State of Employee Engagement Maturity, 2016

1607_StateOfEE2016_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, State of Employee Engagement Maturity, 2016. Here’s the executive summary of this annual review of employee engagement activities, competencies, and maturity levels for large companies:

Engaged employees are critical assets for any customer experience effort. As engaged employees are critical assets, it’s not surprising our data shows that customer experience leaders have more engaged employees than their peers. To understand what companies are doing to engage their employees, we surveyed more than 150 large companies and compared their responses with similar studies we’ve conducted in previous years. We found that two-thirds of companies survey their employees at least once a year, but that less than half of executives consider it a high priority to act on the results of that survey. We used Temkin Group’s Employee Engagement Competency & Maturity (EECM) Assessment to gauge the maturity levels and efforts of these companies across our five competencies, called the “Five I’s of Employee Engagement:” Inform, Inspire, Instruct, Involve, and Incent. We found that only 12% of companies have reached the top two levels of maturity, Enhancing and Maximizing, which is a drop from 2015. The lack of a clear employee engagement strategy remains the number one obstacle that companies face. We also compared companies with above average employee engagement maturity to those with lower maturity and found that employee engagement leaders enjoy better financial results than their counterparts with less engaged workforces.

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Here’s one of the 17 graphics:

1607_EECompetenciesMaturity

Here’s a link to the 2015 study.

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The bottom line: Companies should invest more in employee engagement.

Report: The State of CX Management, 2016

1605_StateOfCXMgt16_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, The State of CX Management, 2016. This is the seventh annual benchmark of CX activities, competencies, and maturity levels.  Here’s the executive summary:

For the seventh straight year, Temkin Group surveyed large companies to evaluate the state of their Customer Experience (CX) management. This year we found an abundance of CX ambition and activity. Most companies have a CX executive leading the charge, a central team coordinating significant CX activities, and a staff of six to 10 full-time CX professionals. Temkin Group has identified four CX core competencies that companies must master if they want to become customer-centric: Purposeful Leadership, Compelling Brand Values, Employee Engagement, and Customer Connectedness. Using Temkin Group’s CX competency and maturity assessment, we found that only 10% of companies have reached the highest two levels of customer experience, and companies are weakest in the Compelling Brand Values competency. We additionally compared CX laggards with CX leaders and discovered that the leaders have stronger financial results, have more senior executives leading the company-wide CX efforts, have more full-time CX employees, use more analytics, and have more support from senior leaders. This report also includes an assessment that companies can use to benchmark their CX efforts and capabilities.

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Temkin Group’s Customer Experience Maturity Model uses six stages of CX maturity based on the four customer experience core competencies. Here’s what we found when 210 companies completed the assessment:

1606_CXMaturity

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Report: What Happens After a Good or Bad Experience, 2016

1603_WhatHappensAfterGoodBadExperiences_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, What Happens After a Good or Bad Experience, 2016. This is our annual analysis of which companies deliver the most and least bad experiences, how consumers respond after those experience (in terms of sharing those experiences and changing their purchase behaviors), and the effect of service recovery (see last year’s report).

Here’s the executive summary:

We asked 10,000 U.S. consumers about their recent interactions with 315 companies across 20 industries, and compared results with similar studies over the previous five years. More than 20% of the customers of Internet service providers and TV service providers reported a bad experience, considerably above the rates for any other industry. Air Tran Airways, Time Warner Cable (TV service and Internet service), Comcast (TV service), and HSBC delivered bad experience to at least one-quarter of their customers. At the same time, less than 3% of Michael’s, Advance Auto Parts, Whole Foods, Publix, Subway, Vanguard, Trader Joe’s, and GameStop customers report having bad experiences. We examined the combination of the volume of bad experiences and the resulting revenue impact and created a Revenues at Risk Index for all 20 industries. At the top of the list, TV service providers and rental car agencies stand to lose at least 6.5% of their revenue from bad experiences. Conversely, less than 2% of the revenues for retailers and supermarket chains are at risk. The companies that recovered very poorly after a bad experience lost sales from 63% of their customers, more than 2.5 times as many as companies that recovered very well. Companies that do a very good job at recovering after a bad experience have more customers who increase spending than those who decrease spending. After a very bad or very good experience, consumers are more likely to give feedback directly to the company than they are to post on Facebook, Twitter, or third party rating sites. Regardless of the channel, consumers are more likely to discuss a very bad experience than a very good one. While the way that consumers give feedback has not changed much since last year, the volume of Twitter usage grew for both positive and negative experiences. Piggly Wiggly, US Cellular, Fifth Third, The Hartford, TriCare, and PSE&G face the potential for the most negatively biased feedback from customers.

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Here are excerpted versions of 4 (out of 15) graphics in the report: Read more of this post

Data Snapshot: Media Use Benchmark, 2016

1603_DS_MediaBenchmark2016_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group data snapshot, Media Use Benchmark, 2016. This is our annual analysis of how much time consumers spend using different media channels (see last year’s data snapshot).

Here’s the data snapshot description:

In January 2016, we surveyed 10,000 U.S. consumers about their media usage patterns and compared the results to similar data we collected in January 2015, January 2014, January 2013, and January 2012. Our analysis examines the amount of time consumers spend every day watching television, browsing the Internet (for both work and leisure), reading books (both print and electronic), reading newspapers (both print and electronic), listening to the radio, reading a print magazine, and using a mobile phone. This data snapshot breaks down the results by income level, education level, and, most expansively, by age.

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Here’s a portion of the first figure from the data snapshot that contains 12 data-rich charts. As you can see, over the past five years:

  • Time spent with mobile web/apps has increased the most, followed by using the Internet at work and at home.
  • Time spent with TV, radios, books, and newspapers have declined.

1603_MediaChanges

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Report: State of the CX Profession, 2016

1603_StateOfCX Profession2016_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, State of the CX Profession, 2016. This is the fifth year that we’ve examined the roles of CX professionals and the third year that we’ve done a compensation study. Here’s the executive summary:

To better understand the mindset and roles of CX professionals today, we surveyed 208 CX professionals and then compared their responses to similar studies we’ve conducted over the previous four years. Eighty-six percent of respondents reported that their CX efforts positively impacted their organization’s business results in 2015, while 96% believe that customer experience is a great profession to work. About nine out of 10 respondents feel satisfied with the people they work with, the content of their jobs, and the company they work for; however only 61% are satisfied with their opportunities for professional advancement. Both web interactions and voice of the customer programs continue to be key areas of responsibility for these professionals, and respondents expect spending on CX activities to grow in 2016, with text analytics and predictive analytics showing the most positive momentum. On this year’s survey, we included our third annual compensation study. We looked at 105CX professionals from large organizations and found that their average compensation (salary plus bonus) ranged from $135,000 for mid-level individual contributors to $260,000 for CX executives.

1602_DontBuyReportJoinCXPA

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Here’s some data that combines pieces of two graphic, showing that CX continues to be a great profession….

1602_CXisGreatProfession

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The bottom line: The CX profession is thriving.

Report: Employee Engagement Benchmark Study, 2016

1602_EEBenchmarkStudy16_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, Employee Engagement Benchmark Study, 2016. This is the fifth year that we’ve published the benchmark of U.S. employees. The research is based on an online survey on Q3 2015. (Take a look at our Employee Engagement Resource Page).

Here’s the executive summary: We used the Temkin Employee Engagement Index to analyze the engagement levels of more than 5,000 U.S. employees. We found that employee engagement has stayed relatively flat since last year, but engagement levels still vary by organization, industry, and individual. Companies with stronger financial performances and better customer experience have employees who are considerably more engaged than their peers. Our research also shows that out of all the industries, the construction sector has the highest percentage of engaged employees, while the retail sector increased the most since last year. We additionally found that companies with 501 to 1,000 employees have the highest percentage of engaged employees and companies with 10,000 or more employees have the lowest level of engagement. On an individual level, our research shows that employees who are highly educated, high-income earners, executives, male, and have very good bosses tend to be the most highly engaged. Given the significant value of engaged employees, we recommend that companies improve engagement levels by mastering our Five I’s of Employee Engagement: Inform, Inspire, Instruct, Involve, and Incent.

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Here’s what we found when we examined year-over-year results for the Temkin Employee Engagement Index:

1602_EEBenchmarkOverall

Here are some other findings from the research: Read more of this post

Report: Benchmarking HR’s Support of CX and Employee Engagement

1602_HRinCXBenchmark_FCOVERWe published a Temkin Group report, Benchmarking HR’s Support of CX and Employee Engagement.  We surveyed 300 HR professionals from large organizations in North America and compared the results to a similar study we did in 2012. Here’s the executive summary:

Employee engagement is a critical component of customer experience (CX). To determine how effectively human resource (HR) departments support these engagement efforts, we surveyed 300 HR professionals from large companies and compared the results to a similar study we conducted in 2012. Seventy-three percent of HR professionals believe that it’s very important for their organization to become more customer-centric, but only 31% believe that HR professionals are significantly helping these efforts. The good news? That’s more than twice the level of HR support we found in 2012. Compared with 2012, companies are both measuring and acting on employee feedback more frequently, and HR professionals have more bandwidth to work on employee engagement. When we compared the companies that deliver outstanding customer experience with the companies that don’t, we found that the CX leaders have better financial performance, enjoy higher levels of engaged employees, are more customer- and mission-centric, have HR groups that are more actively involved in CX and employee engagement activities, and more frequently measure employee feedback. To improve employee engagement, companies must master the Five I’s of Employee Engagement: Inform, Inspire, Instruct, Involve and Incent.

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Here’s one of the 25 figures in the report:

1602_ImportanceOfCXCulture

Here are some other findings in the research: Read more of this post

Report: The State of CX Metrics, 2015

1512_StateOfCXMetrics2015_COVERWe published a Temkin Group report, The State of CX Metrics, 2015. This is the fifth year of this study that examines the CX metrics efforts within large companies. Here’s the executive summary:

Temkin Group surveyed nearly 200 large companies to learn about how they use customer experience (CX) metrics, and we then compared their answers with similar studies we’ve conducted every year since 2011. The most commonly used metrics continue to be likelihood-to-recommend and satisfaction, while the most successful metric is interaction satisfaction. And although the percentage of companies where senior leaders regularly refer to CX metrics has increased significantly from last year, fewer companies are making explicit trade-offs between CX metrics and financial metrics. Companies are best at measuring customer service and phone-based experiences and are worst at measuring the experiences of prospects and customers who defect. In addition to answering survey questions, we also had companies complete Temkin Group’s CX Metrics Competency and Maturity Assessment, which examines four areas of a metrics program: consistent (does the company use common CX metrics across the organization?), impactful (do the CX metrics inform important decisions?), integrated (are trade-offs made between CX and financial metrics?), and continuous (do leaders regularly examine the CX metrics?). Only 14% of respondents received at least a “good” overall rating, and companies earned the lowest rating in integrated. Ultimately, companies with stronger CX metrics programs deliver better customer experience, have stronger business results, more frequently measure ease of doing business, and compensate more employees based on CX metrics.

See the State of CX Metrics studies from 2011, 20122013, and 2014.

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Here are the results form our CX Metrics Competency & Maturity Assessment:

1512_CXMetricsAssessmentResults

Here are some other highlights of the research:

  • Forty-nine percent of companies with stronger CX metrics programs have well above average customer experience compared to 17% of those with weaker CX metrics programs. The stronger CX metrics programs are also 50% more likely to have significantly better business performance then their competitors.
  • While 64% of respondents rate their company as good or very good at collecting and sharing CX metrics, only 22% gave themselves those high marks when it came to making trade-offs between CX metrics and financial metrics.
  • Likelihood to recommend and satisfaction remain the most popular CX metrics, while companies are most successful in using satisfaction as a measure of specific customer interactions.
  • Seven out of 10 companies have compensation tied to CX metrics for some of their employees. Net Promoter® Score is the most common metric used and customer service is the most common group to have its compensation tied to CX metrics.
  • Companies are most effective at measuring customer service and phone interactions and least effective at measuring the experiences of prospects and customers who have defected.

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P.S. Net Promoter Score, Net Promoter, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Satmetrix Systems, and Fred Reichheld.

Report: State of Voice of the Customer Programs, 2015

1510_StateOfVoCPrograms2015_CoverWe published a Temkin Group report, State of Voice of the Customer Programs, 2015. This is the fifth year that we’ve benchmarked the competency & maturity of voice of the customer programs within large organization. Here’s the executive summary:

For the fifth year, Temkin Group has benchmarked the voice of the customer (VoC) programs within large organizations. We found that while most organizations consider their VoC efforts to be successful, less than one-third of organizations actually believe they are good at making changes to the business based on these insights. Respondents think that the most important source of insights in the future will be customer interaction history, and they think that going forward, multiple-choice questions will be the least important. Respondents believe that technology will play an increasingly important role in their efforts, but the largest obstacle to VoC success remains integration across systems. In addition to asking questions about their VoC program, we also had respondents complete Temkin Group’s VoC Competency and Maturity Assessment, which examines capabilities across what we call the “Six Ds”: Detect, Disseminate, Diagnose, Discuss, Design, and Deploy. Although only 16% of companies have reached the two highest levels of VoC maturity, this is still an improvement from the 11% last year. When we compared high-scoring VoC programs with lower-scoring programs, we found that companies with mature programs are more successful, focus more on analytics, have more full-time staff, have more strongly coordinated efforts, and have more involved senior executives.

See the State of VoC reports from 201020112013, and 2014.

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Here are the results from Temkin Group’s VoC Competency & Maturity Assessment:

1510_VoCCompetencyMaturity

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Report: Employee Engagement Competency & Maturity, 2015

1507_StateOfEE2015_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, Employee Engagement Competency & Maturity, 2015. Here’s the executive summary of this annual review of employee engagement activities, competencies, and maturity levels for large companies:

Engaged employees are critical assets for any customer experience effort. Our research of more than 200 large companies shows that front-line employees are the most engaged, while back office employees are often neglected in employee engagement efforts. We also found that two-thirds of companies survey their employees at least once a year, but less than half of executives consider acting on the results as a high priority. We used Temkin Group’s Employee Engagement Competency & Maturity Assessment to gauge the maturity levels and efforts of these companies across our five competencies, called the Five I’s of Employee Engagement: Inform, Inspire, Instruct, Involve, and Incent. We found that less than one out of five companies have reached the top two levels of maturity, Enhancing and Maximizing. This percentage of very mature companies is about the same as in 2014, but the percentage of companies in the lowest two levels of maturity has dropped from 67% to 56% since last year. We also found that many companies face challenges when trying to make improvements. The lack of a clear employee engagement strategy remains the number one obstacle that’s been cited by respondents over the previous three years. We compared companies with above average employee engagement maturity with those with lower maturity and found that the leaders deliver better customer experience and also have better financial results than their counterparts.

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Here’s an excerpt from one of the 20 graphics:

1507_EECompetencyMaturityResults

Here are some additional highlights form the report:

  • The percentage of companies in the top two stages of employee engagement maturity has stayed the same since last year (19%), but the percentage of companies in the lower two sages has declined from 67% in 2014 to 56% on 2015.
  • Sixty-nine percent of large companies measure employee engagement at least annually, but only 45% of companies have executives that treat taking action on the results as a high priority.
  • The most common obstacle to success identified by respondents is the lack of a clear employee engagement strategy.
  • We compared companies with more mature employee engagement efforts with those that have less maturity. Seventy-two percent of the more mature companies have above average customer experience compared with 48% of the other companies.
  • Seventy-five percent of the more mature companies had better financial performance than their competitors’ compared with 50% of companies with lower employee engagement maturity.
  • Executives in companies with more mature employee engagement efforts are almost 3.5 times more likely to treat taking action on employee engagement studies as a high priority.
  • Companies with more mature employee engagement efforts are more than twice as likely to have their customer experience and HR organizations work together on their employee engagement efforts.
  • The report includes data for benchmarking your organization’s employee engagement competency and maturity levels.
  • Here’s a link to the 2014 study.

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The bottom line: Companies should invest more in employee engagement.

Report: The State of the CX Management, 2015

1505_StateOfCXMgt15_COVER_Page_01We just published a Temkin Group report, The State of the CX Management, 2015. This is the sixth annual benchmark of CX activities, competencies, and maturity levels.  Here’s the executive summary:

For the sixth straight year, Temkin Group surveyed nearly 200 large companies to evaluate the state of their Customer Experience (CX) management. This year we found an abundance of CX ambition and activity. Most companies have a CX executive leading the charge, a central team coordinating significant CX activities, and a staff of six to 10 full-time CX professionals. Using Temkin Group’s CX competency and maturity assessment, we found that 32% of companies have reached the highest three levels of customer experience, and while this isn’t very high, it’s still a significant increase from last year. Companies have also achieved the best scores we’ve seen for two of our four core competencies, Employee Engagement and Customer Connectedness. We additionally compared CX laggards with CX leaders and discovered that the leaders have stronger financial results, have more customer-centric cultures, focus more on internal communications, are stronger at customer insights and change management, and are better at digital interactions. Executives in companies with stronger CX competencies also tend to focus more on building a customer-centric culture and less on cutting costs. This report also includes an assessment that companies can use to benchmark their CX efforts and capabilities.

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The research revealed significant ambitions for improvement. While only 7% of companies believe that their organization currently delivers industry-leading customer experience, 55% have a goal to be an industry-leader within three years.

The research also shows that customer experience maturity correlates to financial results. Seventy-seven percent of companies with above average customer experience maturity levels reported that their financial results in 2014 were better than their competitors, compared with only 55% of those with below average customer experience maturity.

Temkin Group’s Customer Experience Maturity Model uses six stages of CX maturity based on the four customer experience core competencies. Here’s what we found when 199 companies completed the assessment:

1505_CXMgtCompetencyMaturity

Here are some additional findings:

  • Senior executives in companies with higher customer experience maturity levels are more likely to focus on the company’s culture and less likely to focus on cutting costs.
  • Sixty-three percent of large organizations have a senior executive in charge of their customer experience efforts.
  • Thirty-seven percent of large organizations have more than 10 full-time customer experience professionals
  • Only 7% of large companies rate their mobile phone experiences as being very good and only 3% of those firms feel that way about experiences that cut across multiple channels.
  • Companies identified “other competing priorities” as the top obstacle to improving customer experience.

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Data Snapshot: Social Media Benchmark, 2015

1505_DS_SocialMediaBenchmark2015_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group data snapshot, Social Media Benchmark, 2015. This is our annual analysis of how consumers use different social media sites on computers as well as on mobile phones (see last year’s data snapshot).

Here’s the data snapshot description:

In January 2015, we surveyed 10,000 U.S. consumers about how frequently they use social media on their computers and mobile phones, and we then compared these usage rates to analogous data we collected in January 2012, January 2013, and January 2014. This analysis looks at the frequency with which consumers in different age groups use computers and mobile phones to access Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, Tumblr, and third-party rating sites. We also examine how usage rates vary by mobile phone type.

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This research has 14 data-rich graphics. Here’s a portion of one showing the daily social media activity via both computers and mobile devices for U.S. consumers:

1505_SocialMediaCOmputerMobile

Some of the findings form the research include:

  • Consumers increased their daily computer usage across all nine social media sites we examined. While daily Facebook access showed the smallest increase, from 46.5% in 2014 to 47.1% in 2015, Twitter jumped the most as daily computer users increased from 13.4% to 16.1% over the past year.
  • Social media activity grew even faster on mobile devices. Daily mobile usage of Facebook increased the most, from 29.3% in 2014 to 36.1% in 2015. Pinterest showed the most momentum, growing its audience of daily mobile users from 8.0% to 11.4% over the last year.
  • The youngest group of consumers we studied, those between the ages of 18 and 24, lowered their daily computer usage of Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+, as well as with ratings and review sites like Yelp and TripAdvisor. Those young adults also lowered their daily mobile use of LinkedIn and Google+.
  • These young adults are very mobile-centric, as they are more likely to use Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Pinterest daily on their mobile devices than on their computers.
  • Consumers between the ages of 25 and 34 are the most active on Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, and ratings sites.
  • Across both computers and mobile devices, consumers between 35- and 44-years-old showed the most increase in daily social media activity between 2014 and 2015.
  • iPhone users are the most active on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest, while Blackberry users are the most active on LinkedIn, Tumblr, and ratings sites.

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The bottom line: Mobile use continues to rise

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