The Four CX Core Competencies (Infographic)

Hopefully you’ve read our FREE report, The Four CX Core Competencies. It outlines the blueprint to building a customer-centric organization. We’ve created this infographic to showcase the competencies:

  1. Purposeful Leadership: Operate consistently with a clear set of values.
  2. Compelling Brand Values: Deliver on your brand promises to customers.
  3. Employee Engagement: Align employees with the goals of the organization.
  4. Customer Connectedness: Infuse customer insight across the organization.

four customer experience core competencies

You can also download an 18″ x 24″ poster version.

Report: Employee Engagement Competency & Maturity, 2017

Employee Engagement Competency and maturityWe just published a Temkin Group report, Employee Engagement Competency & Maturity, 2017. Here’s the executive summary of this annual review of employee engagement activities, competencies, and maturity levels for large companies:

Engaged employees are critical assets to their organization. It’s not surprising, therefore, that customer experience leaders have more engaged employees than their peers. To understand how companies are engaging their employees, we surveyed 169 large companies and compared their responses with similar studies we’ve conducted in previous years. We also asked survey respondents to complete Temkin Group’s Employee Engagement Competency & Maturity (EECM) Assessment. Highlights from our analysis of their responses include:

  • Front-line employees are viewed as the most highly engaged.
  • More than 70% of companies measure employee engagement at least annually, yet only 45% of executives consider taking action on the results a high priority.
  • Sixty-four percent of respondents believe that their social media tools have had a positive impact on their employee engagement activities, an increase from last year.
  • The top obstacle to employee engagement activities continues to be the lack of an employee engagement strategy.
  • While only 23% of companies are in the top two stages of employee engagement maturity, this is still an increase from last year.
  • When we compared companies with above average employee engagement maturity to those with lower maturity, we found that employee engagement leaders have better customer experience, enjoy better financial results, are more likely to take action on employee feedback, and face fewer obstacles than their counterparts with less engaged workforces.
  • You can use the results of the EECM Assessment to benchmark your own employee engagement activities.

Download report for $195+
Buy employee engagement competency and maturity report

Here’s an excerpt from one of the 17 graphics that shows the maturity levels of employee engagement efforts in large companies and their effectiveness across five employee engagement competencies:Employee engagement competencies

employee engagement competency assessments

Download report for $195+download employee engagement competency report

Report: The Shift To Customer Journey Insights

THe shift to customer journey insights reportWe just published a Temkin Group report, The Shift To Customer Journey Insights. Here’s the executive summary:

Customer insights are critical to customer experience programs. However, current insights’ efforts tend to focus on individual interactions rather than on a customer’s entire journey, and as a result, they often fail to provide a complete picture of a customer’s experience with the company. This report helps companies shift their insights efforts from concentrating narrowly on single transactions to focusing broadly on customers’ journeys.

Here are some highlights :

  • We developed an approach to help companies create a comprehensive view of journeys called Customer Journey Insights (CJI), which is made up of five strategies: Internal Journey Alignment, Journey Data Farming, Journey Performance Tracking, Journey Visualization, and Journey Prioritization.
  • We share 20 examples of best practices from companies that are applying these strategies to develop a more complete understanding of their customers’ journeys.
  • To help companies master these strategies, we have identified three stages organizations proceed through on their path to enabling customer journeys: 1) Customer Journey Orientation, 2) Customer Journey Enablement, and 3) Customer Journey Mastery.

Download report for $195
buy customer journey insights report

Here are the best practices focused around five strategies for shifting towards customer journey insights:

  1. Internal Journey Alignment. Shift the company’s mindset away from siloed interaction success to customer goal facilitation.
  2. Journey Data Farming. Tap into adjacent data sources and make linkages across channels.
  3. Journey Performance Tracking. Overhaul metrics to measure performance across customer journeys.
  4. Journey Visualization. Create mechanisms for communicating insights in a way that reinforces the centrality of customer journeys.
  5. Journey Prioritization. Focus on the journeys, customer segments, and channels that are strategic business priorities.

Customer journey insights best practices

Download report for $195
download customer journey insights report


Report Outline:

  • Customer Insights Need An Overhaul
    • Customer Insights Are Falling Short
  • The Rise of Customer Journey Insights
    • Strategy No. 1: Internal Journey Alignments
    • Strategy No. 2: Journey Data Farming
    • Strategy No. 3: Journey Performance Tracking
    • Strategy No. 4: Journey Visualization
    • Strategy No. 5: Journey Prioritization
  • The Path To Customer Journey Analytics

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. The Changing Importance of Customer Insight Channels
  2. CX Measurement Across Different Interaction Channels
  3. Shift To Customer Journey Insights
  4. Customer Journey Insights Best Practices
  5. Linking Customer Journey InsightsTo A Strategic Goal
  6. Examples Of Data Types And Uses By Channel
  7. Use of CX Metrics
  8. Visualization Of A Financial Services Journey
  9. Design Dashboards Differently For Customer Journeys
  10. Explore Variation by Channel
  11. Identify and Prioritize Specific Customer Journeys
  12. Customer Journey Insights: Common Challenges
  13. The Evolution to Customer Journey Insights

Download report for $195
download customer journey insights report

Report: What Happens After a Good or Bad Experience, 2017

what happens after a good or bad experience reportWe just published a Temkin Group report, What Happens After a Good or Bad Experience, 2017. This is our annual analysis of which companies deliver the most and least bad experiences, how consumers respond after those experience (in terms of sharing those experiences and changing their purchase behaviors), and the effect of service recovery (see last year’s report).

Here’s the executive summary:

To understand how good and bad experiences effect customer behavior, we asked 10,000 U.S. consumers about their recent interactions with more than 300 companies across 20 industries. We then compared results with similar studies we’ve conducted over the previous six years. Here are some highlights:

  • About 19% of the customers who interacted with Internet service providers and TV service providers reported having a bad experience – a considerably higher percentage than in other industries. Of the companies we evaluated, 21st Century, Spirit Airlines, and HSBC deliver bad experiences most frequently.
  • We looked at the percentage of customers in an industry had a bad experience and combined that number with the percentage of customers who said they decreased their spending after a bad experience and then used this data to create a Sales at Risk Index for all 20 industries. Rental car agencies stand to lose the most revenue (6.7%) from delivering bad experiences, while retailers stand to lose the least (1%).
  • Investment firms are most effective at recovering after a bad experience, whereas TV service providers are the least effective.
  • After customers have a very bad or very good experience with a company, they are more likely to give feedback directly to the company than they are to post about it on Facebook, Twitter, or third party rating sites. Customers are also more likely to share positive feedback through online surveys and share negative feedback through emails.
  • Compared to previous years, customers are more likely to share feedback over Facebook and Twitter, and these channels are most popular with consumers who are between 25- and 44-years-old.
  • Of all the companies we evaluated, The Hartford is the most likely to receive negatively biased feedback directly from its customers, while Chubb is likely to receive the most positively biased feedback.

Download report for $195
buy what happens after a good or bad experience report

Here are excerpted versions of 3 (out of 19) graphics in the report:
Read More …

Report: The Four Customer Experience Core Competencies (Free)

the four customer experience core competenciesIf you are only going to read only one thing about customer experience, then this report is it. It’s the blueprint for building a customer-centric organization… and it’s free.

We just published a Temkin Group report, The Four CX Core Competencies. This blueprint to building a customer-centric organization is an update to our groundbreaking research that was originally published in 2010 and updated in 2013.

Temkin Group has conducted multiple large-scale studies demonstrating that customer experience (CX) is highly correlated with loyalty across many different industries, in both business-to-consumer and business-to-business environments. When customers have a good experience with a company, they are more likely to repurchase from the company, try its new offerings, and recommend it to others.

While many companies try to improve their CX by making superficial changes, Temkin Group has found that the only path to lasting differentiation and increased loyalty is to build a customer-centric culture. Temkin Group has studied hundreds of companies to uncover the difference between CX leaders and their less successful peers, and has identified four CX competencies that companies must master if they wish to build and sustain CX differentiation:

  1. Purposeful Leadership: Operate consistently with a clear set of values. (see video)
  2. Compelling Brand Values: Deliver on your brand promises to customers. (see video)
  3. Employee Engagement: Align employees with the goals of the organization. (see video)
  4. Customer Connectedness: Infuse customer insight across the organization. (see video)

Download report for FREE
download the four customer experience core competencies

This whiteboard video describes the Four CX Core Competencies:

Here’s an infograhic with the best practices described in the report:the four customer experience core competencies

Download report for FREE
download the four customer experience core competencies


Report Outline:

  • Customer Experience: The Case For A New Approach
  • The Customer Experience Core Competencies
    • Purposeful Leadership: Operate with Clear and Consistent Values
    • Compelling Brand Values: Deliver on Your Brand Promises to Customers
    • Employee Engagement: Align Employees with Goals of the Organization
    • Customer Connectedness: Infuse Customer Insight Across the Organization
  • The Journey to Customer Experience Maturity
  • Assessing Your Customer Experience Competency

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Customer Experience Correlates To Loyalty
  2. The Four Customer Experience Core Competencies
  3. Strategies For The Four CX Core Competencies
  4. Characteristics of Strong Brand Promises
  5. Employee Engagement Virtuous Cycle
  6. Six D’s of a Successful Voice of the Customer Program
  7. Operationalize Critical Fixes: Four Closed Loops For Taking Action
  8. Design Personas
  9. Example of a Customer Journey Map
  10. The Customer Journey Mapping Pyramid
  11. Strategies For Designing Experiences Based on Human Behaviors and Biases
  12. Six Stages of Customer Experience Maturity
  13. Temkin Group’s Customer Experience Competency and Maturity Assessment

Download report for FREE
download the four customer experience core competencies

Report: Humanizing Digital Interactions

humanizing digital interactionsWe just published a Temkin Group report, Humanizing Digital Interactions.

Emotions play an integral role in how customers make decisions and form judgments. This means that how a customer feels about an interaction with a company has an enormous impact on his or her loyalty to that company. However, companies tend to ignore customer emotions, especially during digital interactions, which is problematic as customers are increasingly interacting with companies online. This report focuses on humanizing digital interactions by replicating the elements of strong human conversations.

Here are some highlights:

  • We developed The Human Conversational Model, which is made up of seven elements – Intent Decoding, Contextual Framing, Empathetic Agility, Supportive Feedback, Basic Manners, Self-Awareness, and Emotional Reflection.
  • We share over 35 examples of best practices from companies that are designing digital experiences across the seven elements of The Human Conversational Model.
  • We demonstrate how you could apply The Human Conversational Model to three types of digital activities: opening a new bank account online, purchasing a pair of shoes through an app, and getting technical support online.

Download report for $195
buy humanizing digital interactions report

A gratifying conversation requires two processes:

  • Cooperative Interface. Each participant is required to collaborate with her partner to achieve the shared goal of the conversation – be that casually catching up, gathering information, sharing knowledge, etc. This is the part of the model that a conversational partner sees and responds to, and it consists of five elements: contextual framing, intent decoding, empathetic agility, supportive feedback, and basic manners.
  • Background Mindfulness. This portion of the model is not observable within what would normally be considered the scope of the conservation as it pertains to what happens internally within person. Each participant has a pre-existing notion of who he is as an individual (self-awareness) and throughout the course of the conversation, learns about how he affects other people (emotional reflection). Though not directly observable, “background mindfulness” informs the way in which each participant communicates with his current and future partners.

Here’s an overview of the Human Conversation Model along with best practices we highlight in the report:

human conversation model for digital interactions

Download report for $195
download humanizing digital interactions


Report Outline:

  • Emotion in Digital Experiences
    • Digital Interactions Need an Emotional Makeover
  • Introducing The Human Conversational Model
    • The Seven Elements of The Human Conversational Model
  • Applying The Human Conversational Modelto Digital Interactions
    • Intent Decoding
    • Contextual Framing
    • Empathetic Agility
    • Supportive Feedback
    • Basic Manners
    • Self-Awareness
    • Emotional Reflection
  • Applying The Human Conversational Model

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. The Three Components of a Customer’s Experience
  2. Impact of Success,Effort, and Emotionon Loyalty
  3. The Human Conversational Model
  4. Best Practices Across The Human Conversational Model
  5. Amazon: Remember previous interactions
  6. NorthFace: Ask Questions
  7. HomeAdvisor: Group together like-minded customers
  8. Regions Bank: Modulate tone
  9. Hilton: Use chat
  10. Types of Digital Body Language
  11. Virgin Atlantic and MusicMagpie: Monitor digital body language
  12. TELUS: Make it easy to reach a human
  13. Moven: Adjust communication style
  14. HomeAdvisor: Use loading animation to indicate delays
  15. MailChimp: Use microcopy
  16. Walgreens: Design for mental models
  17. Don’t Interrupt
  18. USAA: Make Information Easily Digestible
  19. California State Lottery: Core brand emotions
  20. Organizational Personality
  21. Moven: Incorporate Emotions Into CJM
  22. Applying The Human Conversational Model

Download report for $195
download humanizing digital interactions

Winners: 2017 CX Vendor Excellence Awards

Congratulations!

Temkin Group announces the winners of its 2017 Customer Experience Vendor Excellence Awards:

Clarabridge, Medallia, Qualtrics, Rant & Rave, and Root.

 

Here are excerpts from the winners’ submissions:

  • Clarabridge’s CX Suite helps companies understand and manage the customer experience. Customer feedback is taken in and analyzed, using Clarabridge’s advanced text analytics and sentiment analysis capabilities. The meaning of the text is analyzed, and the underlying root causes of each trend, complaint, and compliment is identified.
  • Medallia strives to be a single source of truth across all customer touchpoints and to make real-time customer feedback available to employees across the organization. Medallia’s core differentiation lies in our ability to drive thousands of active users to our application rather than depending on centralized CX teams to interpret customer feedback and share periodic reports.
  • Qualtrics’ XM Platform™ provides human-factor data–the beliefs, emotions, and sentiments that tell you “why” things are happening. The predictive intelligence layer within the platform allows companies to not only respond to the experiences they have delivered in the past, but also predict how changes will influence customer satisfaction in the future.
  • Rant & Rave helps businesses profit from customer sentiment, turning customers into Ravers by reacting and responding to their emotions and feelings in realtime. Whilst traditional CX vendors continue to rely on the collation and reporting of feedback through lengthy surveys and market research, we provide our clients with a disruptive engagement model, which delivers industry-leading response rates.
  • Root Inc.’s Customers for Life process includes defining a customer-first culture at the leader level, empowering managers to make customer-focused decisions, and providing the front line with coaching and tools to deliver an authentic customer experience. This approach engages employees at every level so they can internalize their specific role in driving the customer experience and how they impact big-picture outcomes.

Below are the first two sections from the winners’ nomination forms, Company Overview and Make The CaseRead More …

Modernize Leadership: Observe and Improve

1610_observeimproveheader

In a previous post, I described how today’s management techniques reflect outdated assumptions of technology-enabled practices, human behavior, and the meaning of success. That’s why organizations must shift to what I’m calling Modernize Leadership.

I’m writing individual posts for each of the eight key changes required to modernize leadership. In this post, I’m examining the shift from:

Measure and Track to Observe and Improve

Here’s some more information to better understand this shift:

Outdated Thinking
Here are some ways in which leaders must change how they view the world:

  • You can’t manage what you can’t measure. That’s a refrain that I often hear, and it pushes people in the totally wrong direction. The reality is that most things in life are managed without explicit measurements. Think about a typical day. You get up, get dressed, eat breakfast, and commute to work without referring to a dashboard of metrics. That does not mean that measurements can’t help, but they hardly ever tell the entire story.
  • Managers often look for metrics they can to use to hold people and organizations accountable. Setting measurable goals is not a bad thing, but it can cause bad behaviors. Managers will sometimes overly focus on the metrics and ignore nuances such as actual behaviors of the team and shifts in the situation. They act as  if it’s possible to manage something you don’t truly understand. That all falls apart when the an organization needs to deviate from a “straight ahead” orientation.
  • When employees believe that a metric is very important, they are explicitly and implicitly encouraged to do whatever it takes to achieve the goal. This can lead to inappropriate behaviors such as a car salesperson insisting that you give him a “10” on a survey. At Staples, a metric of $200 of add-ons for each computer pushed employees to refuse selling computers to customers who weren’t going to purchase add-ons.

Heres a quote that is often attributed to Albert Einstein:

“Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts.”

Modernized Leadership Actions
Here are some ways in which leaders should act based on a modernized perspective:

  • Look positively forward. Metrics often show how an organization has performed during some previous timeframe, but what you really care about is how it will get better in the future. Make sure that your discussions with people are focused on what the organization can learn in order to  improve, not on blaming people for the problems that caused a poor score.
  • Encourage the right behaviors. If you want your organization to make improvements, then nurture the employee behaviors that will deliver better results. So celebrate employees who are doing the right things, even when the metrics aren’t great.
  • Build operational empathy. If you want your employees to do the right things, then they should feel as if you know their environment. Rather than having employees just see you commenting on metrics from afar, set aside time to regularly get immersed in different parts of the organization. Ask employees how they think the company can improve. This will help you understand when to “back off” reacting too strongly to the metrics and let employees know that numbers aren’t everything.
  • Enable continuous improvement. Instead of using measurements as a pure grading system, use them to identify places for improvement, and always ask: what have we learned and how can we get better? Your organization needs to have an ongoing improvement cycle that is at least at the same pace as your measurement system, otherwise metrics will only lead to frustration.

The bottom line: Observe your organization and focus on improvements.

Report: Tech Vendors: Product and Relationship Satisfaction, 2017

1701_ds_techproductsandrelationships_coverWe just published a Temkin Group data snapshot, Tech Vendors: Product and Relationship Satisfaction of IT Clients, 2017.

During Q3 of 2016, we surveyed 800 IT decision-makers from companies with at least $250 million in annual revenues, asking them to rate both the products of and their relationships with 62 different tech vendors. HPE outsourcing, Google, and IBM SPSS earned the top overall scores, while Trend Micro, Infosys, and SunGard received the lowest overall scores. To determine their product rating, we evaluated tech vendors across four product/service criteria: features, quality, flexibility, and ease of use. And we calculated their relationship rating using four different criteria: technical support, support of the account team, cost of ownership, and innovation of company. We also looked at how the average product and relationship scores of tech vendors have changed over the previous three years.

This research has a report (.pdf) and a dataset (excel). The dataset has the details of Product/Service and Relationship satisfaction for the 62 tech vendors as well as for several tech vendors with sample sizes too small to be included in the published report.

Download report for $495
(includes Excel spreadsheet with data)
BuyDownload3

Here’s a link to last year’s study.

The research examines eight areas of satisfaction; four that deal with products & services and four that examine relationships. Tech vendors earned the highest average satisfaction level for product features (64%) and the lowest for total cost of ownership (57%).

As you can see in the chart below, the overall product/service & relationship satisfaction ranges from a high of 76% for HPE outsourcing down to a low of 42% for Trend Micro.

1701_techproductrelationshipoverallresults

Read More …

Report: Lessons in CX Excellence, 2017

1701_lessonsincxexcellence_coverWe just published a Temkin Group report, Lessons in CX Excellence, 2017. The report provides insights from eight finalists in the Temkin Group’s 2016 CX Excellence Awards. The report, which has 62 pages of content, includes an appendix with the finalists’ nomination forms. This report has rich insights about both B2B and B2C customer experience.

Here’s the executive summary:

This year, we named five organizations the winners of Temkin Group’s 2016 Customer Experience Excellence Award – Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC), Century Support Services, Crowe Horwath, Oxford Properties, and VCA. This report highlights specific examples of how these companies’ customer experience (CX) efforts have created value for both their customers and for their businesses, describes winners’ best practices across the four customer experience competencies: purposeful leadership, compelling brand values, employee engagement, and customer connectedness. it includes all of the winners’ detailed nomination forms to help you collect examples and ideas to apply to your own CX efforts.

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

Here are some highlights from the winners: Read More …

Report: Capturing Insights from Online Customer Communities

1612_communityinsights_coverWe published a Temkin Group report, Capturing Insights from Online Customer Communities. Here’s the executive summary:

Companies across a range of industries use online customer communities to augment their customer support, marketing, and product innovation efforts. However, when used thoughtfully, these online communities can provide value far beyond their original purpose. Because these communities signify an ongoing relationship between the company and participating customers, customer insights teams will find that these forums contain a treasure trove of insights. As a result of these deeper relationships, online communities offer unique advantages to voice of the customer (VoC) programs, including Always-on Feedback, Broad and Diverse Insights, Continuous Dialogue, Peer-to-Peer Dynamics, and Employee-to-Community Interactivity. These unique advantages can help companies adapt to the five Customer Insight Trends that are changing the face of VoC programs: 1) Deep empathy, not stacks of metrics, 2) Continuous insights, not periodic studies, 3) Customer journeys, not isolated interactions, 4) Useful prescriptions, not past descriptions, and 5) Enterprise intelligence, not customer feedback. To help organizations get the most value from their communities, Temkin Group has highlighted best practices for capturing and using insights from customer communities across these five trends. Companies also must plan for the entire community lifecycle to be successful; this includes Determine Strategy, Structure Community, Recruit Members, Grow and Maintain, and Close Down.

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

Online customer communities have some unique attributes that make them a valuable component to voice of the customer programs (one of the 12 figures in the report):

1612_attributesofonlinecommmunities

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

Free eBook: 25 Tips For Tapping Into Customer Emotions

1609_ebook_25emotiontips_finalAs part of our CX Day celebration, we’re giving away this free eBook: 25 Tips For Tapping Into Customer Emotions.

Here’s the executive summary:

Emotions play an essential role in how people form judgments and make decisions. Consequently, a customer’s emotional response to an experience with a company has a significant impact on their loyalty to that company. To help you improve your customer experience, we’ve compiled a list of 25 examples from companies who are tapping into customer emotions, which you can emulate at your own organization.

FreeDownloadButton

The eBook contains 25 tips across four areas: Experience Design, Organizational Personality, Organizational Empathy, and Customer Segmentation.

1610_25emotiontips

The bottom line: Apply these lessons to tap into your customers’ emotions

Report: Five C’s of Mobile VoC Disruption

1607_MobileVOCDisruption_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, Five C’s of Mobile VoC DisruptionBest Practices for Embracing the Power of Mobile in Your Voice of the Customer Program.

As mobile continues to grow in importance, companies will need to renovate their voice of the customer (VoC) programs. Why? Because mobile is more than just another communications channel – it is transforming the way that companies and customers interact. To help companies modernize their VoC programs to account for this increase in mobile usage, we’ve identified the key areas in which mobile is different from other channels, what we call the “Five C’s of Mobile VoC Disruption: “Condensed, Comprehensive, Current, Conversational, and Contextual. These disruptive characteristics will force companies to redefine how they capture, share, and act on customer insights. We’ve identified more than 20 best practices that span all areas of a VoC program, including soliciting in-the-moment feedback for key interactions and accelerating the sharing of useful insights. In order to use mobile successfully, companies need to evolve through three stages of change: 1) Mobile-Enabled, 2) Mobile-Adjusted, and 3) Mobile-First.

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

Here’s an overview of the Five C’s:

5CsOfMobileVoC

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

Report: Customer-Infused Process Improvement

1604_CustomerInfusedProcessImprovement_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, Customer-Infused Process Improvement, which provides five strategies for instilling customers’ needs into process improvement methodologies. Here’s the executive summary:

Process improvement and customer experience have traditionally served different roles in a company. However, these two disciplines are starting to intersect as customer experience looks to process improvement to operationalize key customer interactions and process improvement needs customer experience to provide customer-focused insights and continually monitor new processes. Temkin Group proposes that companies bring these two approaches together into Customer-Infused Process Change. This report highlights five strategies critical to driving this new approach: Prioritize Improvements Across Customer Journeys, Embrace Deep Customer Empathy, Involve Customers in Solution Development, Innovate to Meet Latent Needs, and Measure Success with Customer-Focused Metrics. To make process improvement efforts more customer-centric, organizations need to infuse these strategies across all aspects of process improvement.

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

It’s time for process improvement to become more focused on customers. Rather than abandoning existing process improvement methodologies, Temkin Group recommends bringing a customer orientation into your efforts. We call this approach Customer-Infused Process Change (CiPC), which we define as:

Driving improvements based on a deep understanding of customer needs.

The report provides best practices across five strategies of CiPC:

  1. Prioritize Improvements Across Customer Journeys: By understanding customer interactions in the context of their broader journeys, companies can invest in process improvements projects that have the most impact on the customer’s experience.
  2. Embrace Deep Customer Empathy: In order to effect sustainable changes, employees impacted by redesigned processes need to understand why these changes are important to customers.
  3. Involve Customers in Solution Development: Process improvement efforts must have resources available to ensure that ongoing, incremental changes can be made based on this customer input.
  4. Innovate to Meet Latent Needs: Customers can’t always articulate what they want; instead, they often describe a slightly improved version of what they already know.
  5. Measure Success with Customer-Focused Metrics: Companies can’t measure the success of process improvement efforts with internally focused, operational metrics.

1604_CustomerInfusedProcess5Strategies

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

The bottom line: Process improvements need more customer insights.

Report: The Federated Customer Experience Model

1603_PathtoFederation_COVERWe published a Temkin Group report, The Federated Customer Experience Model. Here’s the executive summary:

When a company starts its customer experience (CX) journey, it often establishes a centralized team to build the necessary internal capabilities and catalyze change. However, that team’s effectiveness can be limited by a number of things, including divided attention within lines of business and a lack of resources to reach across the company. In its 2012 report, The Future of Customer Experience, Temkin Group identified the need for CX efforts to become more federated. To succeed in the long-run, companies need to focus more on embedding CX capabilities across departments and functions through a federated CX model. A federated model is a structure for enabling and coordinating a distributed set of customer experience capabilities, and it operates through centers of excellence—which spread specialized expertise beyond the boundaries of the centralized team—and enterprise CX coordination—which ensures that company-wide goals and standards are in place—and distributed CX skills and mindsets—which infuses customer-centric mindset throughout the company. These centers of excellence include deep analytics, reporting and data visualization, experience design, customer-driven process improvement, and culture change management. Enterprise CX coordination oversees enterprise CX strategy and governance, insights, metrics and reporting, standard methodologies and tools, central CX storylines, and portfolio management. And distributed CX skills and mindsets encompasses CX goal alignment, customer understanding, empathy orientation, improvement focus, and organizational awareness. The path companies take to federation can include multiple phases, such as centrally driven, cross-functional participation, distributed expertise, and federated. As their companies move down this path, successful CX professionals will be the ones who learn the business, coach and advise others, embrace empowerment, and keep learning; or, alternatively, they can choose to specialize and leave the central CX team to join one of the centers of excellence.

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

Here are the elements of a Federated CX Model:

1603_FederatedCXModel

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3