CX Myth #4: Net Promoter Score Is The Best/Worst Metric

CX Myths: Debunking Misleading Beliefs About Customer Experience

Many common beliefs about customer experience are misguided, based on oversimplifications or a lack of consideration for real-world constraints. In this series of posts, we debunk these myths.


CX Myth #4: Net Promoter Score Is The Best/Worst Metric

What’s Wrong: People often argue that Net Promoter Score (NPS) is the greatest metric, while other people argue that it’s a terrible metric. Both of those points of view are off the mark.

What’s Right: We rarely see a company succeed or fail based on the specific metric that it choses. That doesn’t mean that you can chose a ridiculous metric, but most reasonable metrics provide the same potential for success (and failure). In many cases, NPS is a reasonable choice, as our data shows that it often correlates to customer loyalty. The way you use a metric is often far more important than the metric that you chose.

What You Should Do:

  • Pick a simple metric. It’s important that you choose a metric that employees will understand, so they are motivated to help improve it. The metric can be based on customer attitudes (like NPS), behaviors (like repeat purchases), or even results (like first call resolution). Just pick a simple metric that aligns with your business goals.
  • Follow our five steps. To drive improvements using the metric, follow Temkin Group’s five steps. to a strong CX metrics program: 1) Determine a core CX metric, 2) set achievable goals, 3) identify key drivers, 4) establish key driver metrics, and 5) make the suite of metrics actionable.
  • Focus on all four action loops. People often discuss an action loop with CX metrics, but we’ve identified four customer insight-driven action loopsImmediate responsecorrective actioncontinuous improvement, and strategic change. Any CX metrics program should put in places processes to close all four loops.
  • Don’t compensate too much. When companies establish CX metrics, they often establish compensation based on them. While this can be a valuable approach to raise awareness and alignment, it can also be a problem if the level of compensation is too large (can encourage bad behaviors), it focuses on individual results (CX is a team sport), or the goals are too precise (some metrics are inherently jittery).
  • Have very clear sampling strategy. The approach for sampling often has a very significant impact on results. If you have multiple segments of customers and they each have a different profile (as many do), then your overall scores can change wildly based on the mix of those customers that are included in your calculations.

The bottom line: Obsess about your metrics program, not your metric.

Report: Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2018

Temkin Group Net Promoter Score (NPS) BenchmarkWe published a Temkin Group report, Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2018. This is the seventh year of this study that includes Net Promoter® Scores (NPS®) on 342 companies across 20 industries.

Here’s the executive summary:

Many large companies use Net Promoter® Score (NPS®) to evaluate their customers’ loyalty. To compare scores across organizations and industries, Temkin Group measured the NPS of 342 companies across 20 industries based on a survey of 10,000 U.S. consumers. Here are the highlights from this benchmark:

  • With an NPS of 65, USAA’s banking business earned the highest score in the study, followed closely by its insurance business and Navy Federal Credit Union.
  • Spectrum and Consolidated Edison of NY received the two lowest NPS, with scores of -16 and -12 respectively.
  • The industry average for NPS ranged from a high of 39 for auto dealers and streaming media down to a low of 0 for TV/Internet service providers.
  • USAA’s and Navy Federal Credit Union’s scores both outpaced the banking industry average by more than 40 points, while Motel 6’s and Super 8’s scores both fell nearly 30 points behind the hotel industry average.
  • Only five industries saw their average NPS increase over the past year. Of those, airlines’ and utilities’ scores increased the most, going up three points each.
  • Although a majority (54%) of companies’ NPS declined over the previous year, three companies – BCBS of Florida, Fairfield Inn, and Ameren Illinois Company – actually increased their NPS by more than 20 points since 2017.
  • 18- to 24-year-old consumers give companies the lowest NPS, with an average score of 3 across all industries. Meanwhile, two age groups – consumers between the ages of 25 and 34 and those who are older than 74 – tied for giving the highest NPS, with an average score of 36 across industries.
  • NPS is highly correlated with customer experience. On average, customer experience leaders enjoy an NPS that is 21 points higher than the NPS of customer experience laggards.

See the NPS Benchmark Studies from 2012, 2013201420152016, and 2017.

Here’s a list of companies included in this study (.pdf).

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(includes report (in .pdf) plus dataset (.xlsx)
Check out this sample of the dataset
Purchase Net Promoter Score (NPS) benchmark

Here are the top and bottom 10 companies:

Here are the NPS scores across 20 industries:
Temkin Group Net Promoter Score (NPS) Benchmark Industry Scores

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Check out this sample of the dataset
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Report Outline:

  • USAA and Navy Federal Credit Union Earn Top NPS Across 342 Companies
    • USAA and Navy Federal Credit Union Earn Top Spots in NPS Rankings
    • NPS Increases With Age
  • Want Higher NPS? Improve Customer Experience

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Temkin Group Measured Net Promoter Scores For 342 Companies Across 20 Industries
  2. Net Promoter Scores (NPS): Top and Bottom 20 Companies
  3. Range of Net Promoter Scores (NPS) Across Industries
  4. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 1)
  5. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 2)
  6. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 3)
  7. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 4)
  8. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 5)
  9. Promoters, Passives, and Detractors By Industry
  10. Net Promoter Scores (NPS): Most Above and Below Industry Average
  11. Industry Average NPS, 2016 to 2018
  12. Net Promoter Scores (NPS): Largest Gains and Losses Between 2017 and 2018
  13. Net Promoter Score (NPS) by Age by Industry
  14. Customer Experience Correlates To Net Promoter Scores (NPS)

Download report for $495+
(includes report (in .pdf) plus dataset (.xlsx)
Check out this sample of the dataset
buy Net Promoter Score (NPS) Benchmark Study

If you’re looking to create a strong NPS program, check out our VoC/NPS Resource Page.

P.S. Net Promoter Score, Net Promoter, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Satmetrix Systems, and Fred Reichheld.

Report: Tech Vendor NPS & Loyalty Benchmark, 2018 (B2B)

We just published Temkin Group’s annual Tech Vendor NPS & Loyalty Benchmark Study. Here’s the executive summary:

Temkin Group Net Promoter Score (NPS) & Loyalty Benchmark Study of B2B Tech VendorsFor the seventh year in a row, we have calculated the Net Promoter Score® (NPS®) of over 60 technology vendors and analyzed the correlation between NPS and four client loyalty behaviors – likelihood of repurchasing from that technology vendor, likelihood of trying new offerings, likelihood of forgiving the vendor if it makes a mistake, and willingness to act as a reference for the vendor. To gather this data, we surveyed 800 IT decision-makers from large North American firms about their relationships with their technology providers. Through this research, we found that:

  • Across the 61 tech vendors we examined, NPS ranged from +51 to -22.
  • VMware, IBM software products, DellEMC, and Microsoft server software earned the highest NPS, while Check Point, Splunk, and Alcatel-Lucent received the lowest.
  • Overall, the average NPS for the tech vendor industry stayed steady from last year, declining only slightly from 21.4 in 2017 to 21.2 this year.
  • Our analysis shows that NPS is strongly correlated to customers’ willingness to spend more with tech vendors, try their new products and services, forgive them after a bad experience, and act as a reference for them with prospective clients.
  • In addition to examining NPS, the research also provides a benchmark of several areas of loyalty. IT decision-makers are most likely to purchase more from DellEMC and Microsoft server software, try new offerings from Oracle outsourcing and Dell outsourcing, forgive Oracle outsourcing and Micro Focus if they make a mistake, and act as a reference for AWS and IBM outsourcing.

This report includes a .pdf report and a spreadsheet with the company-level data. You can see a sample of the data spreadsheet (.xls).

Download report for $695+
ROI of Customer Experience (CX), 2018

Here are two of the 11 graphics in the report:

Download report for $695+ROI of Customer Experience (CX), 2018


Report Outline:

  • Net Promoter Scores for 61 Tech Vendors
    • VMware Earns Top Net Promoter Score
    • Net Promoter Score Correlates to Multiple Aspects of Loyalty

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Net Promoter Score (NPS) of 61 Tech Vendors
  2. Average NPS for Tech Vendors, 2012 to 2018
  3. Likelihood of Repurchasing from Tech Vendors
  4. NPS Versus Likely to Repurchase
  5. NPS Responses Versus Likely to Repurchase
  6. Temkin Innovation Equity Quotient(TIEQ) of Tech Vendors
  7. NPS Versus Temkin Innovation Equity Quotient
  8. Temkin Forgiveness Ratings (TFR) of Tech Vendors
  9. NPS Versus Temkin Forgiveness Ratings
  10. Willingness to Act As A Reference For Tech Vendors
  11. NPS Versus Willingness To Act As A Reference

Download report for $695+ROI of Customer Experience (CX), 2018

Note: Net Promoter Score, Net Promoter, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Satmetrix Systems, and Fred Reichheld.

What is Net Promoter Score? (Video)

Net Promoter® Score (NPS®) is one of the most popular CX metrics, so we are often asked to discuss it with clients. In addition to helping build successful NPS systems, we often provide a basic overview for executive teams and broader audiences of employees. That’s why created this video. It’s meant to explain what NPS is all about and why it may be a valuable approach for some companies. It’s a great video to share across your organization if you are using or considering using NPS. If you’d like more information, check out our NPS/VoC program resources.


CX Sparks: Guides For Stimulating Customer Experience DiscussionsThis video is a great introduction to a discussion with your team. That’s why we’ve created a CX Sparks guide that you can download and use to lead a stimulating discussion.


Video Script:

You may have heard of Net Promoter Score, which is often referred to as NPS. It’s a popular customer experience metric. Let’s examine what it is.

Walt Disney once said “Do what you do so well that they want to see it again and bring their friends.” He understood the incredible value of customers who actively recommend a company.

NPS is a measurement system that helps companies track and increase the likelihood of customers recommending an organization.

First of all, let’s describe the actual NPS measurement. It begins by asking customers a simple question:

“How likely are you to recommend this company to a friend or relative?”

Customers choose a response from an 11-point scale that goes from 0 “not at all likely” to 10 “extremely likely.”

Based on their response, customers are placed into one of three categories:

  • If they choose between 0 and 6, then they are DETRACTORS.
  • If they choose 7 or 8, then they are PASSIVES.
  • If they choose 9 or 10, then they are PROMOTERS.

NPS is calculated by taking the percentage of Promoters and subtracting the percentage of Detractors. You then multiply the percentage by 100 to get a whole number between -100 and +100.

Calculating Net Promoter Score (NPS)

Let’s say that 100 people answered the question, and 40 are Promoters, 50 are Passives, and 10 are Detractors. To calculate NPS, we would take the 40% for Promoters, subtract the 10% for Detractors, which leaves 30%. After multiplying it by 100, the NPS is 30.

While NPS provides a score, 30 in this case, the power of the system does not come from overly focusing on the number.

The goal of using NPS is to find and correct issues that create Detractors and to find and repeat activities that create Promoters. So it is important to understand what is causing customers to choose their responses.

That’s why most NPS programs include a follow-up question that asks the customer why they chose the score that they did. This question should be open-ended, not multiple choice, so customers can express their views in their own words.

What do you do with the data?

First of all, you want to “close the loop” with the customers who responded. This means contacting at least some of the customers who respond. Companies often try to reach out to all of the Detractors, to find out more about their problems and to see if their issues can be resolved. They also often contact Promoters, to thank them and hear more about what they like.

Next, you want to examine the opportunities to improve NPS by looking at what situations and activities cause Promoters and Detractors. This requires analyzing the responses from each group separately, and often involves incorporating other information about customers. You may also want to examine what drives Promoters and Detractors across different business areas or customer segments.

There’s no value in identifying the items that are driving NPS up or down unless a company does something with what they learn.

That’s why companies establish processes for reviewing, prioritizing, and taking action on the items that they uncover. In other words, the way to improve NPS is to have an ongoing approach for improving customer experience.

When used correctly, NPS helps companies follow Disney’s advice and do what they do so well that their customers want to see them again and bring their friends.

If being customer-centric matters to your organization, then why leave it to chance? Contact Temkin Group, the customer experience experts, by emailing info@temkingroup.com, or visit our website, at TemkinGroup.com.

Note: Net Promoter, Net Promoter Score, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Inc., Fred Reichheld and Satmetrix Systems, Inc.

Do Companies Like Net Promoter Score?

Whenever we discuss Net Promoter® Score, we get a bifurcated set of reactions. Some people love NPS® and others hate it. So we decided to more quantitatively gauge the sentiment.

In a recent study, Temkin Group asked more than 300 CX professionals to share their thoughts about NPS. As you can see below:

  • Most aren’t impressed. Over half of respondents say that NPS is either just like or worse than other metrics.
  • Many are avid fans. More than four out of ten respondents think that NPS is a better metric than most others. What’s most interesting about this group is that an overwhelming majority of them don’t just think that NPS is good, but they think it’s great.

What’s my opinion? NPS is not a panacea or the ultimate question, but it can be a fine metric if deployed in the right situations and used in the right ways. See my recorded webinar, Net Promoter Score, Fact and Fiction and read our recent report on how to build a successful CX metrics program.

The bottom line: Focus less on the CX metric and more on the overall program.

Net Promoter, Net Promoter Score, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Inc., Fred Reichheld and Satmetrix Systems, Inc.

Net Promoter Score: Fact and Fiction

It seems like every year I get a surge of questions about Net Promoter® Score (e.g., NPS®). Well, it’s that time of year.

Rather than re-writing my answers, I decided to share a webinar that I recorded a few years ago. Much of that data has been updated, but the content remains totally applicable. This is a great primer on NPS. Enjoy!

You should also check out Temkin Group’s VoC/NPS Resource Page for current data and more advice on how to use NPS. In particular, read My Latest 9 Recommendations For NPS.

Note: Net Promoter, Net Promoter Score® and NPS® are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Inc., Fred Reichheld and Satmetrix Systems, Inc

Report: Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2017

Net Promoter score benchmark study, 2017We published a Temkin Group report, Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2017. This is the sixth year of this study that includes Net Promoter® Scores (NPS®) on 299 companies across 20 industries based on a study of 10,000 U.S. consumers.

Here’s the executive summary:

Many large companies use Net Promoter® Score (NPS) to evaluate their customers’ loyalty. To compare scores across organizations and industries, Temkin Group measured the NPS of almost 300 companies across 20 industries based on a survey of 10,000 U.S. consumers. Here are the highlights from this benchmark:

  • With an NPS of 66, USAA’s insurance business earned the highest score in the study for the fifth year in a row.
  • Comcast received the lowest NPS for the third year in a row with a score of -9.
  • The industry average for NPS ranged from a high of 43 for auto dealers down to a low of 9 for TV & Internet service providers.
  • Citibank, whose NPS lagged 35 points behind the banking average, fell the farthest behind its peers.
  • All industries saw their average NPS decline over the past year, though Utilities dropped the most.
  • 18- to 24-year-old consumers give companies the lowest NPS (with an average score of 17 across industries), while consumers 65 and older give the highest NPS (with an average score of 38 across industries).
  • NPS is highly correlated with customer experience. On average, customer experience leaders enjoy an NPS over 18 points higher than customer experience laggards.

See the NPS Benchmark Studies from 2012, 201320142015, and 2016.

Here’s a list of companies included in this study (.pdf).

Download report for $495
(includes report (in .pdf) plus dataset in Excel)
Purchase Net Promoter Score (NPS) benchmark

Here are the NPS scores across 20 industries:
range of net promoter scores across industries

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(includes report (in .pdf) plus dataset in Excel)
buy Net Promoter Score (NPS) Benchmark Study


Report Outline:

  • USAA and JetBlue Lead the NPS Benchmark of 299 U.S. Companies
    • USAA and JetBlue Earn Top Spots in NPS Rankings
    • NPS Increases With Age
  • Want Higher NPS? Improve Customer Experience

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Temkin Group Measured Net Promoter Scores For 299 Companies Across 20 Industries
  2. Net Promoter Scores (NPS): Top and Bottom 20 Companies
  3. Range of Net Promoter Scores (NPS) Across Industries
  4. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 1)
  5. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 2)
  6. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 3)
  7. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 4)
  8. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 5)
  9. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 6)
  10. Promoters, Passives, and Detractors By Industry
  11. Net Promoter Scores (NPS): Most Above and Below Industry Average
  12. Industry Average NPS, 2015 to 2017
  13. Net Promoter Score (NPS) by Age by Industry
  14. Customer Experience Correlates To Net Promoter Scores (NPS)

Download report for $495
(includes report (in .pdf) plus dataset in Excel)
buy Net Promoter Score (NPS) Benchmark Study

If you want to know what data is included in this report and dataset, download this sample Excel dataset file.download Net promoter score study data sets

If you’re looking to create a strong NPS program, check out our VoC/NPS Resource Page.

P.S. Net Promoter Score, Net Promoter, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Satmetrix Systems, and Fred Reichheld.

Report: Tech Vendor NPS Benchmark, 2017 (B2B)

tech vendor NPS benchmark studyWe just published a Temkin Group report, Tech Vendor NPS Benchmark, 2017. The research examines Net Promoter Scores® (NPS®) and the link to loyalty for 58 tech vendors based on feedback from 800 IT decision makers in large North American organizations. We also compared overall results to our benchmarks from the previous five years. Here’s the executive summary:

For the sixth year in a row, we looked at the correlation between NPS and loyalty for technology vendors. To examine this link, we surveyed 800 IT decision-makers from large North American firms, asking about their relationships with their technology providers. Through this research, we found that:

  • Across the 58 tech vendors we examined, NPS ranged from +43 to -22.
  • Microsoft, SAS, Google, and VMware earned the highest NPS, while Accenture consulting, ACS, Autodesk, and Fujitsu received the lowest.
  • Overall, the average NPS for the tech vendor industry decreased by more than eight points from last year, down from 29.9 to 21.4 – the lowest level of any year we’ve studied.
  • Our analysis shows that NPS is correlated to customers’ willingness to spend more with tech vendors, try their new products and services, forgive them after a bad experience, and act as a reference for them with prospective clients.
  • When it comes to loyalty, IT decision-makers are most likely to purchase more from Microsoft and HP, try new offerings from Microsoft and Google, forgive SAS and Microsoft if they make a mistake, and act as a reference for Apple and IBM SPSS.

The report includes graphics with data for NPS, likelihood to repurchase, Temkin Forgiveness Ratings, and Temkin Innovation Equity Quotient (likely to try new offerings).. The excel spreadsheet includes this data (in more detail) for the 58 companies as well as summary data for other tech vendors with less than 40 pieces of feedback. It also includes the summary NPS scores from 2016.

Download report for $695
Purchase includes Excel spreadsheet with data.
Download sample spreadsheet to see details. 
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As you can see in the chart below, the NPS ranges from a high of 43 for Microsoft servers down to  a low of -22 for Fujitsu.the Net promoter score of 58 tech vendors

The industry average NPS decreased from 29.9 last year to 21.4 this year this year.

the average net promoter score for tech vendors

Report details: The report includes graphics with data for NPS, likelihood to repurchase, Temkin Forgiveness Ratings, and Temkin Innovation Equity Quotient (likely to try new offerings). The excel spreadsheet includes this data (in more detail) for the 58 companies as well as summary data for other tech vendors with less than 40 pieces of feedback. It also includes the summary NPS scores from 2016.

Download report for $695
Purchase includes Excel spreadsheet with data.
Download sample spreadsheet to see details. 
download net promoter score for tech vendors report


Report Outline:

  • Net Promoter Scores for 58 Tech Vendors
    • Microsoft, SAS, Google, and VMware Earn Top Net Promoter Scores
    • Net Promoter Score Correlates to Multiple Aspects of Loyalty

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) of 58 Tech Vendors
  2. Average NPS for Tech Vendors, 2012 to 2017
  3. Likely to Repurchase for Tech Vendors
  4. NPS Versus Likely to Repurchase
  5. Temkin Innovation Equity Quotient (TIEQ) of Tech Vendors
  6. NPS Versus Temkin Innovation Equity Quotient
  7. Temkin Forgiveness Ratings(TFR) of Tech Vendors
  8. NPS Versus Temkin Forgiveness Ratings
  9. Willing to Be A Reference For Tech Vendors
  10. NPS Versus Willingness To Act As A Reference

Download report for $695
Purchase includes Excel spreadsheet with data.
Download sample spreadsheet to see details. 
download net promoter score for tech vendors report

 

Note: See our 2016 NPS benchmark2015 NPS benchmark2014 NPS benchmark2013 NPS benchmark and 2012 NPS benchmark for tech vendors as well as our page full of NPS resources.

P.S. Net Promoter Score, Net Promoter, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Satmetrix Systems, and Fred Reichheld.

Dataset: UK Net Promoter Score Benchmark, 2017

In our Q1 2017 UK consumer benchmark study, we asked 5,000 UK consumers to provide Net Promoter® Score (NPS®) ratings for the companies that they had interacted with during the previous 90 days. We used that data to create an NPS benchmark of 157 companies across 16 industries.

You can purchase and download the dataset, which includes companies that had at least 85 respondents. The excel spreadsheet includes detailed NPS for all 157 companies and 16 industries, along with data on industry-level NPS by the age group of the respondents.

Download dataset for $295+
(see sample spreadsheet)
Buy the UK Net Promoter score benchmark study

Some of the highlights of the study include (see figures below):

  • Company NPS ranges from a high of 45 (Nationwide) down to a low of -39 (Bank of Scotland).
  • Industry averages for NPS range from a high of 20 (supermarkets) to a low of -12 (rental cars & transport).
  • The NPS by age groups ranges from a high of 34 (NPS of auto dealers by consumers who are at least 65-years-old) to a low of -34 (NPS of health insurers by 25- to 34-year-olds).
  • When we compare NPS to the 2017 Temkin Experience Ratings, UK, we find a very high level of correlation. That shouldn’t be a surprise, because improving customer experience is the path to better NPS.

UK Net promoter scores

Read More …

Report: Economics of Net Promoter Score, 2017

We just published a Temkin Group report, Economics of Net Promoter Score, 2017. Here’s the executive summary:

Net Promoter® Score (NPS®) is a popular metric that companies use to analyze their customer experience efforts. But how does this metric actually relate to loyalty? To uncover the relationship between NPS and loyalty, we asked 10,000 U.S. consumers to give an NPS to 331 companies across 20 industries, and we then looked at how this score correlated with four key loyalty behaviors. Here are some highlights from this research:

  • Compared to detractors, promoters are over four times more likely to repurchase from a company, over five times more likely to forgive a company if it makes a mistake, over seven times more likely to try new offerings from a company, and almost five times more likely to trust a company.
  • We performed a detailed analysis of the loyalty data for promoters, passives, and detractors across 20 different industries: airlines, auto dealers, banks, computer and tablet makers, credit card issuers, fast food chains, health plans, hotels and rooms, insurance carriers, investment firms, parcel delivery services, rental car and transport agencies, retailers, software firms, streaming media services, supermarkets, TV and Internet service providers, TVs and appliance makers, utilities, and wireless carriers.
  • Ultimately, if a company wants to benefit from using NPS as a key metric, it must focus on improving customer experience, not obsessing over the metric itself.

Download report for $295+
BuyDownload3

Note: To see NPS for individual companies and industries, download the report, Net Promoter Benchmark Study, 2016.

These two graphics from the report show the average connection between NPS and loyalty across all 20 industries, while the report also contains data for each of the 20 industries:

Download report for $295+BuyDownload3


Report Outline:

  • Promoters are More Loyal than Passives or Detractors
  • Loyalty of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across 20 Industries
    • NPS Loyalty Details for 20 Industries
  • Focus on Customer Experience, Not A Metric

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. NPS Correlates to Future Purchase Intentions
  2. Value of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across Industries
  3. Value of Promoters Versus Detractors
  4. Likelihood of Repurchasing of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across Industries
  5. Likelihood of Trying New Offerings of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across Industries
  6. Likelihood of Forgiving of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across Industries
  7. Likelihood of Trusting of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across Industries
  8. Better Customer Experience Correlates to Higher NPS
  9. Value of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across Industries
  10. The Four Customer Experience Core Competencies

Download report for $295+BuyDownload3

While this report provides clear evidence that promoters are more valuable than detractors, it is not an endorsement of NPS as a metric. The data shows that companies should be able to increase their customer loyalty if they create promoters and cut down on detractors. As you will see on our VoC/NPS Program Resources, the processes for improving is more important than the specific metric being used.

La Quinta “Gaming” Highlights Flaws in NPS

I’m in Las Vegas to watch some NBA Summer League games (Go Celtics!), and am staying overnight at a La Quinta near the airport. I found this note on the table next to the bed.

While there’s no problem with a nice thank you note, one section caught my eye…

*********
You may be receiving a guest satisfaction survey from La Quinta in the near future and we hope you feel confident that you may answer the question “Would you recommend us to your family and friends” with a 10.

If you should be surveyed, La Quinta uses a 1-10 scale (10 being the best). Although the scale ranking is from 1 to 10, scores of 8 or below results in a negative impact on the overall rating for this hotel.
*********

First of all, this is what I would call “gaming” the system. Anytime you ask for a specific score or range of scores, it’s gaming. Instead of getting a true response from the customer about his/her experience, the customer is forced to balance her honest feedback with a request for a specific score. Some customers are likely to be intimidated, since they may think that the hotel has visibility into their specific response. This would lower response rates and alter true feedback.

The second problem this highlights is the Net Promoter Score (NPS) calculation (since this is clearly an NPS question). As you probably know, NPS segments responses into three categories: Detractors (6 or less), Passives, (7 or 8) and Promoters (9 or 10). Is there really that much difference between an “8” or “9” on this scale? I think people giving either of these ratings would think that they are saying that the experience was good, but not the best that they’ve ever had. The choice of an “8” or “9” may be more driven by an internal rating gauge (that is different in each person), then it is being caused by a distinctive difference in the actual experience.

[Side note: La Quinta’s NPS is 9 points below the hotel industry average in Temkin Group’s latest NPS benchmark study]

The final, more substantial problem is how the metric is being used. My guess is that La Quinta is using NPS to substantially impact the compensation of some hotel employees. This pushes people to focus on “the number” as opposed to what’s really important, the ability to continuously improve.

To be honest, the issues I discuss above are not NPS-specific. I’ve seen them with a variety of metrics, and we work with many companies that are successfully using NPS. So let me share some advice for improving your use of CX metrics….

I wrote a post a few years ago that listed these five rules to stop employees from gaming your feedback system:

  1. Don’t mention or refer to a score
  2. Don’t mention specific survey questions
  3. Don’t mention any consequences
  4. Don’t say or imply that you will see their responses
  5. Don’t intimidate customers in any way

Check out my most about nine recommendations for NPS programs:

  1. The choice of metric is not as important as people think
  2. Driving improvements is what’s critical
  3. Promoters & detractors need their individual attention
  4. Sampling patterns really, really matter
  5. NPS is for relationships, not transactions
  6. NPS is for teams, not individuals
  7. Compensation can be a real problem
  8. Target ranges make more sense than single numbers
  9. There are four loops to close

The bottom line: CX metrics need to focus on improvements, not numbers

Report: Tech Vendors: Product and Relationship Satisfaction, 2017

1701_ds_techproductsandrelationships_coverWe just published a Temkin Group data snapshot, Tech Vendors: Product and Relationship Satisfaction of IT Clients, 2017.

During Q3 of 2016, we surveyed 800 IT decision-makers from companies with at least $250 million in annual revenues, asking them to rate both the products of and their relationships with 62 different tech vendors. HPE outsourcing, Google, and IBM SPSS earned the top overall scores, while Trend Micro, Infosys, and SunGard received the lowest overall scores. To determine their product rating, we evaluated tech vendors across four product/service criteria: features, quality, flexibility, and ease of use. And we calculated their relationship rating using four different criteria: technical support, support of the account team, cost of ownership, and innovation of company. We also looked at how the average product and relationship scores of tech vendors have changed over the previous three years.

This research has a report (.pdf) and a dataset (excel). The dataset has the details of Product/Service and Relationship satisfaction for the 62 tech vendors as well as for several tech vendors with sample sizes too small to be included in the published report.

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Here’s a link to last year’s study.

The research examines eight areas of satisfaction; four that deal with products & services and four that examine relationships. Tech vendors earned the highest average satisfaction level for product features (64%) and the lowest for total cost of ownership (57%).

As you can see in the chart below, the overall product/service & relationship satisfaction ranges from a high of 76% for HPE outsourcing down to a low of 42% for Trend Micro.

1701_techproductrelationshipoverallresults

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Report: The State of CX Metrics, 2016

1612_stateofcxmetrics2016_coverWe published a Temkin Group report, The State of CX Metrics, 2016. This is the sixth year of this study that examines the CX metrics efforts within large companies. Here’s the executive summary:

Temkin Group surveyed 183 companies to learn about how they use customer experience (CX) metrics and then compared their answers with similar studies we’ve conducted every year since 2011. We found that the most commonly used metrics continue to be likelihood-to-recommend and satisfaction, while the most successful metric is transactional interaction satisfaction. Only 10% of companies regularly consider the effect of CX metrics when they make day-to-day decisions. The top two problems companies face are limited visibility of CX metrics and the lack of taking action on metrics. Companies are best at measuring customer service and phone-based experiences and are worst at measuring the experiences of prospects and customers who defect. We also had companies complete Temkin Group’s CX Metrics Program Assessment, which examines four characteristics of a metrics program: consistent (does the company use common CX metrics across the organization?), impactful (do the CX metrics inform important decisions?), integrated (are trade-offs made between CX and financial metrics?), and continuous (do leaders regularly examine the CX metrics?). Only 11% of respondents received at least a “good” overall rating in this assessment, and companies earned the lowest average rating in integrated. Companies with stronger CX metrics programs deliver better customer experience and use more effort and likelihood-to-repurchase metrics.

See the State of CX Metrics studies from 2011, 201220132014, and 2015.

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Here are the results form our CX Metrics Competency & Maturity Assessment (one of 22 graphics in the report):

1612_cxmetricsmaturity

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Report: ROI of Customer Experience, 2016

1610_roiofcx_coverWe published a Temkin Group report, ROI of Customer Experience, 2016. This research shows that CX is highly correlated to loyalty across 20 industries. Here’s the executive summary:

To understand the connection between customer experience (CX) and loyalty, we examined feedback from 10,000 U.S. consumers that describes both their experiences with and their loyalty to different companies. To examine the CX component, we used the 2016 Temkin Experience Ratings (TxR), which evaluated 294 companies. Our analysis shows that there’s a very large correlation between companies’ TxR and the willingness of customers to purchase more from them. This connection holds true for other areas of customer loyalty as well. We used this data to calculate the revenue impact of CX across 20 industries. We found that a moderate increase in CX generates an average revenue increase of $823 million over three years for a company with $1 billion in annual revenues. Rental car agencies have the most to gain from improving CX ($967 million), while utilities have the least to gain ($645 million). While all three components of customer experience¬—success, effort, and emotion—have a strong effect on loyalty, our research shows that emotion is the most important element. When compared with companies with very poor CX, companies with very good CX have a 16.7 percentage-point advantage in customers who are willing to purchase more from them, 16.7 percentage-point advantage in customers who trust them, 10.3 percentage-point advantage in customers willing to forgive them if they make a mistake, and 7.1 percentage-point advantage in customers who are willing to try their new products. Additionally, companies with very good CX ratings have an average Net Promoter Score that is 22 points higher than the scores of companies with poor CX. We recommend that you build your own CX ROI models, using our five-step approach for guidance.

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This is one of the figures in the report, and it shows the high correlation between Temkin Experience Ratings (customer experience) and purchase intentions for 294 companies across 20 industries:
1610_purchasemorecorrelationgraphHere’s an excerpt from the graphic showing the three year impact on revenues for a $1 billion company in 20 different industries:

1610_roirevsbyindustry

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To see the customer experience levels of all 294 companies, download to the free 2016 Temkin Experience Ratings report.

P.S. Net Promoter Score, Net Promoter, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Satmetrix Systems, and Fred Reichheld.

Report: Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2016

1610_npsbenchmarkstudy_coverWe published a Temkin Group report, Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2016. This is the fifth year of this study that includes Net Promoter® Scores (NPS®) on 315 companies across 20 industries based on a study of 10,000 U.S. consumers. Here’s the executive summary:

As many large companies use Net Promoter® Score (NPS) to evaluate their customer loyalty, Temkin Group measured the NPS of 315 companies across 20 industries. With an NPS of 68, USAA’s insurance business earned the highest score in the study for the fourth year in a row. Four other companies also earned an NPS of 60 or higher: Cadillac, USAA’s banking business, Apple, and USAA’s credit card business. In addition to earning some of the top scores, USAA’s banking, credit card, and insurance businesses also all outpaced their respective industries’ averages by more than any other company. Comcast, meanwhile, earned the lowest NPS for the second year in a row, coming in just below Time Warner Cable, Cox Communications, and McDonalds. And while all 20 industries increased their average NPS from last year, utilities enjoyed the biggest improvement in its score. Out of all the companies, US Airways’s and Advantage Rent-A-Car’s scores improved the most, whereas TriCare’s and Lexus’s scores declined the most. On average across the industries, the youngest consumers gave companies the lowest NPS, while 35- to 44-year-olds gave them the highest NPS.

See the NPS Benchmark Studies from 2012, 20132014, and 2015.

Here’s a list of companies included in this study (.pdf).

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Here are the NPS scores across 20 industries:
1610_rangeofindustrynps

Here are some other highlights of the research:

  • Five industries toped the list with an average NPS of 40 or more: auto dealers, software, investments, computers & tablets, and appliances.
  • The bottom scoring industries are TV service providers, Internet service providers, and health plans.
  • USAA’s insurance, banking, and credit card businesses earned NPS levels that are 30 or more points above their industry averages. Five other firms are 20 or more points above their peers: com, credit unions, Chick-fil-A, Apple, and Trader Joe’s.
  • Five companies fell 25 or more points below their industry averages: RadioShack, Motel 6, eMachines, McDonalds, and Days Inn.
  • US Airway’s NPS increased by 31 points between 2015 and 2016, the largest increase of any company. Eight other companies improved by 25 or more points: Fifth Third, 21st Century, Fujitsu, DHL, MetLife, HSBC, Commonwealth Edison, PSE&G, and Hannaford.
  • TriCare, Lexus, Mercedes-Benz, Baskin Robins, and Nordstrom had double-digit declines in NPS between 2015 and 2016.

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If you want to know what data is included in this report and dataset, download this sample Excel dataset file.Screen Shot 2014-10-17 at 4.05.17 PM

P.S. Net Promoter Score, Net Promoter, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Satmetrix Systems, and Fred Reichheld.