Examining 10 Emotions, 8 Interactions, and Resulting Loyalty

Any regular reader of this blog likely knows that emotion is a key topic for Temkin Group. We labelled 2016 as The Year of Emotion and operationalizing emotion is one of our 2017 CX trends.

As part of our push to drive more detailed discussions about emotion, we examined the emotions that consumers feel after specific interactions. It turns out that different interactions lead to a variety of emotions which have differing loyalty effects.

The chart below shows 10 emotions that 10,000 consumers selected to describe how they felt after completing eight interactions.

As you can see above:

  • Most interactions lead to positive emotions, as the four most prevalent emotions on our list are Happy, Excited, Relieved, and Confident.
  • Happy and Excited are the most common emotions.
  • Purchasing a new pair of shoes leads to the most frequent emotion, Happy.
  • Researching a health insurance plan doesn’t create any consistent emotional response, as the most common emotion (Relieved) was selected by less than one-third of consumers.
  • Investigating a mistake in a monthly bill is the interaction that most frequently leads to Angry and Frustrated.
  • Filing a claim with a home or auto insurance company is the interaction that most frequently leads to Appreciated and Worried.
  • Researching a hotel or rental car for a trip is the interaction that most frequently leads to Confident.
  • Researching a health plan is the interaction that most frequently leads to Confused and Disappointed.
  • Using a new mobile phone or tablet for the first time is the interaction that most frequently leads to Excited.
  • Reaching out for technical support for a computer is the interaction that most frequently leads to Relieved.

We also looked at the loyalty that consumers have to companies based on the emotions that they’ve experienced. The chart below examines the loyalty for each of the 10 emotions averaged across all eight interactions (I’ll examine interaction-specific data in a future post):

As you can see:

  • Excited and Appreciated lead to the most loyalty.
  • Disappointed leads to the worst loyalty profile.
  • The lack of any of these emotions leads to less of both loyalty and disloyalty.

The bottom line: Focus on the specific customer emotions you’re creating.

Emotion and the Four Customer Experience Core Competencies

If you’ve followed our research, then you know that organizations build and sustain customer-centric cultures by mastering the Four CX Core Competencies: Purposeful Leadership, Compelling Brand ValuesEmployee Engagement, and Customer Connectedness.

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You also know that we’ve called 2016 The Year of Emotion, and have been trying to raise the visibility of this key area with out Intensify Emotion efforts.

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Hopefully you recognize that emotion is a critical component of customer experience. To further deepen that thinking, here’s some advice for infusing emotion across all of the competencies:

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Want Loyal Customers? Start Talking About Their Emotions!

Did you know that customers who feel adoring after an experience are more than 11 times as likely to buy more from a company than customers who feel angry? And customers who feel appreciative are more than 5 times as likely to trust a company than those who feel agitated?

That’s because how customers feel about an interaction has a significant impact on their loyalty to a company. So let’s talk about emotions.

Despite the importance of customer emotions, they are all too often neglected (or outright ignored) inside of companies. As a result of this negligence, consumers give their providers very low emotion scores in our Temkin Experience Ratings.

It’s time to start talking about emotions. To help spur this dialogue, we introduced a new vocabulary that we call the Five A’s of an Emotional Response.

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Every time a customer interacts with you, they feel one of these A’s:

  • Angry: Customers feel wronged by the interaction and will look for opportunities to tell other people (a.k.a. vent) about the situation. They will try to stay away from the organization.
  • Agitated: Customers didn’t enjoy the interaction and will think twice about doing business with the organization in the future.
  • Ambivalent: Customers had no significant emotional response and will remain as loyal as they were before the interaction.
  • Appreciative: Customers feel that the organization outperformed their expectations and are more inclined to do business with the organization in the future.
  • Adoring: Customers feel like company fully met their needs and will look for opportunities to tell other people about the situation. They will try to interact more with the organization in the future.

If you’re still wondering why you might want to talk about the Five A’s, here’s some data that will hopefully entice you to increase your emotion vocabulary. We analyzed the loyalty of 10,000 U.S. consumers based on the Five A’s of their emotional response to interactions across 20 industries – more than 100,000 overall interactions in total.

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As you can see above, the Five A’s aren’t just a set of words, they’re a strong indication of the loyalty of your customers. Compared with those who feel “angry,” customers who feel “adoring” are more than 11 times as likely to buy more, 17 times as likely to recommend the company, 9 times as likely to try new offerings, 6 times as likely to forgive the company if it makes a mistake, and 10 times as likely to trust the company.

If you are not talking about emotion, then you’re not being purposeful about customer loyalty. Here are some ways that you can start using the Five A’s:

  • Training. If you teach all employees this scale, then your organization will have a common vocabulary for discussing customer reactions. This framework will help trainees gauge how customers would likely respond to situations and discuss what they could do to improve the customer’s ultimate emotional response.
  • Coaching. Supervisors can ask their employees a very simple question after an interaction: “How do you think the customer felt about the call?” This can work for any employee that interacts with customers: phone reps, retail salespeople, cashiers, insurance agents, bank tellers, etc.
  • Designing. When you are creating a new experience (product, process, interaction, etc.), get feedback from customers about how they feel. Internally, you can have discussions like… “Most of the customers were ambivalent, but if we make this change then I think we can make most of them appreciative and even a few of them will be adoring.
  • Tracking customer emotions. Every time employees interact with a customer or make a decision, they can give themselves a score based on what they believe is (or will be) the customers’ most likely emotional response to their action:
    • Angry (-3)
    • Agitated (-1)
    • Ambivalent (0)
    • Appreciative (+1)
    • Adoring (+3)

The total across these interactions and decisions represents a customer delight score. Employees can calculate this score on a regular basis (daily, weekly) and track how well they are doing over time.

Having an emotion vocabulary will hopefully get you to focus more about this critical topic. And if you just start talking about emotion, you will help stimulate employees’ natural empathy. So… start talking about emotion!

The bottom line: Talk about making customers adoring, not angry.

The Demographics of Happiness

1611_demographicsofhappinessTomorrow I will join millions of Americans in celebrating Thanksgiving. Many of us will spend the day with our families devouring turkey, stuffing, and other savory dishes while watching football games. It’s also a great time to actually give thanks.

I have a lot to appreciate; a wonderful family, a great group of friends, a thriving business, an amazing Temkin Group team, and the world’s best clients. As we know from the positive psychology movement, the act of appreciation creates happiness—and all of that makes me very happy.

Given the holiday, I decided to dig into Temkin Group’s Q3 2016 Consumer Benchmark Study and see who’s happy. I analyzed which of the 10,000 U.S. consumers in our study agree with the statement “I am typically happy.”

This first chart shows data from the 27 states where we had at least 100 respondents. As you can see, happiness ranges from a high of 83% in Oregon down to a low of 67% in Wisconsin and Indiana.
1611_hapinessbystate

The next set of charts show the level of happiness across different demographic segments:

  • Genderations: The happiest females are 75 and older, while 65- to 74-year-old males are the happiest (85% say that they are typically happy). 18- to 24-year-olds are the least happy, followed closely by 45- to 54-year-olds. Between the ages of 18 and 44, males are happier than females. Females are happier between 45- and 74-years-old.
  • Education: As the level of education increases, so does happiness. Eighty-five percent of those with an advanced degree are happy, compared with only 60% of those who did not graduate high school.
  • Ethnicity: There’s little variation in happiness across ethnic groups. Caucasians are the happiest (73%), but only three points above African Americans (73%).
  • Income: Only 60% of consumers making less than $25,000 per year are happy. Happiness rises with income until consumers’ household income hits about $100,000, after which happiness plateaus around 86%.
  • Family: Married people are happier. Eighty-four percent of those who are married with young children are happy, followed by married people with older children and with no children at all. The least happy people are those who are not married and do not have kids; only 66% are happy.

Read more of this post

People Aren’t Perfect, Design Around Their Biases

Every day, people are faced with innumerable choices, and methodically weighing the pros and cons of each one is not only unnecessary, it is also mentally draining. In order to ease this cognitive burden, people have evolved two modes of thinking—intuitive thinking and rational thinking—to help us make decisions more efficiently. 1611_2typesofthinking2Intuitive thinking—also known as System 1 thinking—is fast, effortless, automatic, and takes place in our unconscious, while rational thinking—also known as System 2 thinking—is slow, effortful, logical, and takes place consciously. Intuitive thinking actually helps us reach successful conclusions more quickly and economically than rational thinking.

Intuitive thinking relies heavily on existing mental shortcuts—known as heuristics—and on cognitive biases. Heuristics are simple rules of thumb that our brains have evolved to help us reach satisfactory—though not always optimal—decisions swiftly and efficiently. Sometimes, however, heuristics fail and lead to cognitive biases, which are systematic errors in the way we think. For instance, people:

  • Are more affected by losses than by gains. One of the most important underlying principles of human decision-making is called Prospect Theory, which holds that humans do not make decisions based on a rational evaluation of the final outcome, but rather on an unconscious evaluation of the potential gains and losses of each choice.
  • Prefer simplicity over complexity. Biases and heuristics are all about lightening the cognitive load, so it is no surprise that people tend to choose options that are easier to mentally process, even when a more complicated option is actually better.
  • Are affected by current emotional and visceral states. Like cognitive processes, visceral states and emotions play an essential role in helping people make successful choices, but sometimes they can lead to biases. For example, people are more impulsive when they are hungry, thirsty, sexually aroused, or in other heightened states of emotion.
  • Are heavily influenced by those around them. People are naturally social creatures who automatically imitate the actions and mimic the emotions of those around them.
  • Make decisions based on context. Decisions are not made in a vacuum; rather, they are extremely dependent on context. Context can include the physical environment in which a person makes a decision, the unconscious priming effects a person encounters, how a decision is framed, and what other choices are available for comparison.
  • Misjudge their past and future experiences. Our memory is not like a videotape; it does not record every moment of an experience, placing equal emphasis on each second. Instead, it is like a camera, taking snapshots at certain crucial moments and then retroactively judging the experience based on those snapshots.

For more information on how to incorporate these biases into your efforts, see the report Behavioral Guide to Customer Experience Design.

The bottom line: Embrace human biases, don’t ignore them.

Exploring Multiple Emotions During Contact Center Interactions

In a previous post, I discussed results from a joint study that we conducted with Mattersight Personality Labs (MPL) to examine customer emotions within contact center interactions.

MPL isolated the occurrence of four specific emotions: joy, anger, sadness, and fear in more than 118,000 calls across 11 large brands. In addition to detecting the customer emotion, we also analyzed the lengths of the calls, the percentage of calls transferred to other agents or supervisors, and the Net Promoter® Score (NPS®) provided by customers right after their calls.

To normalize the analysis across companies, we divided the data for individual calls by company averages. So a “1.0” is equal to company average.

While the previous post examined the individual emotions, this post looks at the combinations of the four emotions. While less than 1% of callers experienced all four emotions, it happened during more than 650 calls­—more than enough for us to analyze.

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As you can see in the chart above:

  • Joy plus Fear creates the longest calls. When the calls contain all four emotions, they are almost two and a half times as long as an average call. The next two combinations, which are also more than two times as long as an average call, also contain joy and fear.
  • Multiple emotions create longer calls. The only calls that are shorter than average are those where we could only detect sadness. The next shortest calls were those that only had joy and anger.
  • Anger plus Fear creates the most transfers. When callers exhibit both anger and fear, the calls are transferred at a rate that is seven times the average. The next highest transfers also happen when the caller demonstrates fear.
  • Joy creates the fewest transfers. The three types of calls that have the lowest transfer rates all contain joy, as do six out of seven. The only types of calls without joy that also have below average transfer rates are those that only contain sadness.
  • Joy raises NPS. When a caller feels only joy, the call results in the highest NPS. Joy is also a part of the calls that earn the two next highest NPS.
  • Anger plus other emotions lowers NPS. The lowest NPS occurs whenever anger is combined with another emotion. The worst combination is anger plus sadness.

The bottom line: Anger and fear are terrible emotions to occur on a call.

Start Talking About Emotions (Video)

To help celebrate “The Year of Emotion” on CX Day (and beyond), Temkin Group created this fun, short video: Start Talking About Emotion.

The bottom line: Add the Five A’s of an Emotional Response to your vocabulary

Free eBook: 25 Tips For Tapping Into Customer Emotions

1609_ebook_25emotiontips_finalAs part of our CX Day celebration, we’re giving away this free eBook: 25 Tips For Tapping Into Customer Emotions.

Here’s the executive summary:

Emotions play an essential role in how people form judgments and make decisions. Consequently, a customer’s emotional response to an experience with a company has a significant impact on their loyalty to that company. To help you improve your customer experience, we’ve compiled a list of 25 examples from companies who are tapping into customer emotions, which you can emulate at your own organization.

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The eBook contains 25 tips across four areas: Experience Design, Organizational Personality, Organizational Empathy, and Customer Segmentation.

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The bottom line: Apply these lessons to tap into your customers’ emotions

The Ultimate Customer Experience Infographic, 2016

Once again, Temkin Group is publishing a new infographic as part of our CX Day celebration.

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Take a look at last year’s ultimate CX infographic.

Here are links to download different versions of the infographic:

1610_cxmattersinfographic Infographic: in .jpg format, in .pdf format

1610_cxmattersinfographic_poster 18″ x 24″ poster: in .jpg format, in .pdf format

 

Customer Emotions (Joy, Anger, Sadness, and Fear) Affect Contact Center Interactions

As you may know, Temkin Group labeled 2016 “The Year of Emotion” in its annual listing of customer experience trends. Why? Because emotion drives loyalty. And yet, despite its significant impact on customer loyalty, organizations do not focus on emotion enough. So to help increase organizations’ awareness of this critical area of customer experience, we created the Intensify Emotion Movement.

As part of our efforts to bring emotion to forefront of CX discussions, we worked with Mattersight Personality Labs to examine customer emotions within contact center interactions, a notorious hotbed of customer discontent. Analysts at Mattersight did the heavy lifting, applying the company’s analytical models to more than 118,000 calls across 11 large brands. While customers experience multiple emotions during every call, for this analysis we isolated the occurrence of four specific emotions: joy, anger, sadness, and fear.

Temkin Group and Mattersight Personality Labs collectively analyzed the results of this work. In addition to detecting customers’ emotions, we also analyzed the lengths of the calls and the Net Promoter® Score (NPS®) provided by customers right after their calls. [Why NPS? Because we had the data.]

To normalize the data across companies, we divided the data for individual calls by company averages. So a “1.0” is equal to company average.

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The chart above captures some of the key findings:

  • Joy leads to best calls. No surprise, the only positive emotion we examined results in the highest NPS, the shortest calls, and the least frequent call transfers. Interestingly, the calls where we detected joy are actually slightly longer than average (although well less than the other three emotions). While we didn’t analyze the exact reasons why this happens, it could be caused by the willingness of the caller and agent to take a bit more time conversing when the customer feels happier and more friendly.
  • Fear leads to most expensive calls. In instances when customers felt detectably fearful, the call time jumps to 87% higher than company average, by far the longest of any emotion. In these calls, we also found that the caller was transferred to another agent or supervisor more than 3.5-times as frequently as the company average. The NPS drops lower than average as well.
  • Anger leads to lowest NPS. When customers experience anger, they give the lowest NPS (19% below company average). The calls are also 40% longer than average and are more than twice as likely to be transferred.
  • Sadness leads to low NPS. Customers who experience sadness give companies an NPS that is only slightly higher than the one they give when they are angry (18% below company average).

Additional Findings

Here are some additional findings from the research:

Read more of this post

2016 Temkin Emotion Ratings (Publix, Chick-fil-A, and Residence Inn Are the Leaders)

For the previous five years, we’ve measured emotion as part of the Temkin Experience Ratings (TxR). This year, we examined 294 companies across 20 industries based on a survey of 10,000 U.S. consumers (see methodology section below). The TxR examines the three elements of customer experience: success, effort, and emotion. In this post, I examine the results for the Temkin Emotion Ratings.

Emotion is the component of customer experience that is the most significant driver of customer loyalty. And we showed the connection between emotion and loyalty in a recent post. To find out more about how you can tap into the power of customer emotions, visit the Intensify Emotion Movement.

Publix, Chick-fil-A, and Residence Inn earned the only “good” scores for delivering the most positive emotional experiences, followed closely by H-E-B, True Value, Kroger, Save-a-Lot, Wawa Food Market, QVC, and Amazon.

At the other end of the emotional spectrum, the companies with the lowest Ratings are Comcast (for both Internet service and TV service), Fujitsu, Health Net, Blue Shield of CA, Anthem, Time Warner Cable, Commonwealth Edison, Medicaid, Charter Communications, and AT&T.

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Do you want to the data from the 2016 Temkin Effort Ratings? It’s included in the Temkin Experience Ratings spreadsheet that you can purchase for $395.
Here’s a sample of the spreadsheet (.xls)

Here are some additional insights from the 2016 Temkin Emotion Ratings:

  • The supermarket and fast food industries earned the highest average Temkin Emotion Ratings (at “okay” level), while health plans, TV service providers, and Internet providers were at the bottom with “very poor” ratings.
  • The following companies earned ratings that are the most above their industry averages: Amazon, Residence Inn, Florida Power & Light, TXU Energy, National Car Rental, and Alabama Power Company.
  • The following companies earned ratings that are the farthest below their industry averages: Fujitsu, Motel 6, Super 8, Chrysler, Volkswagen, Commonwealth Edison, and Citibank.
  • The following companies earned the largest improvement between the 2015 and 2016 Ratings: Coventry Health Care, True Value, Con Edison of NY, Consumers Energy Company, Dominion Virginia Power, and Fox Rent A Car.
  • The following companies declined the most between 2015 and 2016: Volkswagen, Fujitsu, Commonwealth Edison, BMW, GM, Health Net, and JetBlue.

Read more of this post

The (Large) Connection Between Emotion And Loyalty

In case you missed it, we labeled 2016 as The Year of Emotion in our annual listing of CX trends. To help organizations better understand customer emotions, we created the Intensify Emotion Movement. Why did we put so much of a focus on emotion? Because it drives loyalty.

We tapped into our recent consumer benchmark study to examine the connection between how consumers rate the emotional component of their interactions and their loyalty across 20 industries. [Note: The emotional data is from the emotion component of the Temkin Experience Ratings]

In the graphic below, we examined the average across all 20 industries. Compared with consumers who had negative emotional experience, consumers who had positive emotional experiences are:

  • 15.1 times more likely to recommend the company
  • 8.4 times more likely to trust the company
  • 7.8 times more likely to try new products and services
  • 7.1 times more likely to purchase more from company
  • 6.6 times more likely to forgive company after a mistake

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If you’d like to see this data for each of the 20 industries, you can purchase and download the dataset for $195. To see what you’ll be purchasing, download this sample spreadsheet.

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The bottom line: Want loyal customers? Provide positive emotional experiences.

Intensify Emotion Provider Showcase

IntenisfyEmotion2Our research shows that emotion has a significant impact on customer loyalty, yet is almost entirely ignored. To help companies recognize and tap into the power of customer emotion, we started the “Intensify Emotion” campaign.

As part of this campaign, we’ve created the Intensify Emotion Provider Showcase as an opportunity to highlight some of the vendors who are helping their clients discuss, measure, enhance, and design for emotion. Vendors submitted nomination forms to Temkin Group describing the ways in which they help clients emotionally connect with customers.

Given the complicated nature of human emotions, there is no single path companies must follow to engage customer emotions; rather there are any number of possible strategies and methods companies can adopt. To help companies learn about some of the concrete ways they can improve emotions, we wanted to highlight a sample of cutting-edge vendors who are using proven, scalable strategies to Intensify Emotion across organizations. For example, some vendors use facial or voice recognition technologies to identify customer emotions, some create feedback mechanisms that specifically measure emotions, some design for sensory cues that trigger emotions, and others focus on amplifying customer emotion throughout the company.

CONGRATULATIONS to the companies that were selected into the showcase based on the innovativeness of their use cases and the scalability of their products for a large organization (the remainder of this post was directly contributed by the vendors):

  • audEERING GmbH (www.audeering.com): audEERING develops intelligent audio analysis algorithms and provides consulting services to help you integrate next-generation audio analysis technology into your products and your workflow. audEERING’s main area of expertise is automatic emotion recognition from speech signals. Its technology is based on decades of solid, published scientific evidence and uses audEERING’s popular open-source speech and emotion analysis framework openSMILE as core. Here’s the company’s use case:
    • Callyser – Automatic Emotion Recognition from Speech
  • BigEars Ltd (www.bigears.com): BigEars are award-winning world leaders in interactive voice feedback surveys. Founded in 2004, BigEars helps businesses become more profitable by connecting them to their customers in a way not previously possible. Our unique feedback application, Customer Radio, brings feedback to life by making the voice of the customer easy to capture, listen to and share. With BigEars every number has a human experience behind it, giving you answers to questions you never knew to ask.Here are the company’s use cases:
    • Cabot Financial
    • Wellington City Council
  • Cogito (www.cogitocorp.com): Cogito Corporation develops and delivers behavioral analytics software that provides sales, service and care management professionals with the real-time emotional intelligence needed to improve sales results, deliver amazing customer experiences and enhance quality of care. By applying validated behavioral science through artificial intelligence and machine learning, Cogito helps the world’s most successful enterprises enhance employee productivity and better care for their customers. Backed by Romulus Capital and Salesforce.com, Cogito is headquartered in Boston, MA. Here are the company’s use cases:
    • Building Emotional Connections On Every Member Phone Conversation 
    • Delivering Better Care Through Real-time Emotional Intelligence
    • Artificial Intelligence Enhances Negotiation Skills
  • Confirmit (www.confirmit.com): Confirmit enables organizations to develop and implement Voice of the Customer, Employee Engagement and Market Research programs that deliver insight and drive business change. Confirmit’s clients create multi-channel, multi-lingual feedback and research programs that engage customers, empower employees, and deliver a compelling respondent experience. Confirmit’s solutions are the most secure, reliable and scalable in the world, and provide technology and expertise that deliver high Return on Investment to leading companies across a range of industries. Here are the company’s use cases:
    • Giving the Customer a Seat in the Boardroom 
    • Sony Mobile Corporation: Emotion in Social Media
    • Uncovering Emotion in B2B Sales and Support
  • CrowdEmotion (www.crowdemotion.co.uk): CrowdEmotion is a cloud-based emotion intelligence company that measures emotion in a way that is scalable, insightful and cost-effective. We are a dedicated team on a mission to collect and curate the world’s emotions to further human understanding. To do so, we provide a cloud-based platform where academics and industry can extract emotions from consumer devices to infuse them into the business in a relevant way. Here are the company’s use cases:
    • The Science of Engagement 
    • BBC Worldwide: Tackling the Elephant
  • Fiveworx (www.fiveworx.com): Fiveworx is a customer engagement software platform that was purpose-built for the energy sector. Our custom-built email marketing and marketing automation software uses persona-based messaging and journeys (derived from proprietary polling of 80,000 Americans on their opinions, behaviors and attitudes around energy and environment) to tap into energy customers’ deeper emotional drivers and engage and motivate them to act, increasing customer participation in utility programs, products and services; improving customer satisfaction, and delivering energy savings. Here’s the company’s use case:
    • Alliant Energy in Wisconsin takes utility customer engagement to a new level
  • Man Made Music (www.manmademusic.com): Man Made Music is a strategic music and sound studio. We score entertainment and brand experiences by creating unique sonic identity systems that can be woven through brand touchpoints – communications, devices, customer support and immersive environments. Because people have instinctive and visceral emotional reactions to music and sound, our work helps brands efficiently and effectively convey meaning and strengthen emotional connections with their audiences, by providing more familiar and desirable brand experiences. Here are the company’s use cases:
    • Using Sonic Identity to Better Connect Across Touchpoints
    • Using Sonic Identity to Galvanize People Around an Organization’s Mission
    • Using Sonic Identity to Ignite Emotion in Immersive Environments: IMAX
  • Mattersight (mattersight.com): Mattersight’s mission is to help brands have better conversations with their customers. Using a suite of innovative personality-based software applications, Mattersight can analyze and predict customer behavior based on the language exchanged during service and sales interactions. This insight can then facilitate real-time connections between customers and the agents best capable of handling their needs. Fortune 500 enterprises rely on Mattersight to drive customer retention, employee engagement and operating efficiency. Here are the company’s use cases:
    • Predicting NPS outcomes for 100% of conversations through measuring emotions
    • Fortune 20 healthcare leader slashes costs in call-center through better emotional connections

Details of Intensify Emotion Providers

Here are the detailed submissions from the vendors (we did not edit these): Read more of this post

Report: Emotion-Infused Experience Design

1606_EmotionInfusedExperienceDesign_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, Emotion-Infused Experience Design.

Emotions play an essential role in how people make decisions. Consequently, how a customer feels about their experience with a company has the most significant impact on their loyalty to that company. And yet despite their importance, both customers and companies agree that organizations do a poor job of engaging customers’ emotions. To help companies create a stronger emotional connection with customers, we’ve developed an approach called Emotion-Infused Experience Design (EIxD). To master EIxD, organizations must continuously focus on three questions: “Who exactly are these people (who happen to be our customers)?” “What is our organizational personality?” and “How do we want customers to feel?” This report offers both advice and examples about how to apply these three questions across four facets that affect emotion: senses, feelings, social, and values. And to help infuse these practices across the organization, we have also identified some strategies for how to turn employees into agents of EIxD.

Download report for $195
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Our research shows that emotion is often a missing link in customer experience. While emotions may seem ephemeral and subjective, we developed a concrete methodology you can use to design for emotion. We call this methodology “Emotion-Infused Experience Design” (EIxD), and we define it as:

An approach for deliberately creating interactions that evoke specific customer emotions.

To master EIxD, you must ask (and answer) three questions throughout the entire design process:

  1. Who exactly are these people (who happen to be our customers)? You cannot design emotionally engaging experiences without a solid grasp on who your target customers are—what they want, what they need, what makes them tick.
  2. What is our organizational personality? Research shows that people relate to companies as if they are fellow human beings rather than inanimate corporate entities.
  3. How do we want our customers to feel? People are inherently emotional beings, and every interaction they have with you will make them feel a certain way—whether you intend it to or not.

To address the three questions of EIxD, this report shows how to design around four elements of emotion: senses, feelings, social, and values. Here are two of the 26 figures in the report:

1606_TwoPartsofEmotion1605_CokeStarbucksEmotions

Download report for $195
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Epidemic of Emotionless Experience Design

As I’ve discussed many times on this blog, customers experience interactions across three dimensions, Success, Effort, and Emotion. So how effective are companies at proactively designing for those elements? Not very.

In our latest CX management study, we surveyed 252 companies with at least $100 million in annual revenues and asked them about their experience design effectiveness. As you can see in the graphic below:

  • Only about one in 10 companies is very good at proactively designing for any aspect of customer experience.
  • More companies are good at designing for success (completion on interactions) than effort or emotion, but less than half of companies consider themselves good in this area.
  • Emotion is the weakest link, as only about one-third of companies think they are good at proactive emotional design.

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If companies don’t improve their experience design skills, then their customer experience will never be better than inconsistent. And the biggest problem is emotion, which happens to drive the most loyalty.

If you want to fix this problem, we’ve got some help. Keep an eye on this blog for a new Temkin Group report on emotional experience design, which we’ll be publishing in a couple of weeks.

The bottom line: Join the Intensity Emotion Movement!

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