Report: Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2018

Temkin Group Net Promoter Score (NPS) BenchmarkWe published a Temkin Group report, Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2018. This is the seventh year of this study that includes Net Promoter® Scores (NPS®) on 342 companies across 20 industries.

Here’s the executive summary:

Many large companies use Net Promoter® Score (NPS®) to evaluate their customers’ loyalty. To compare scores across organizations and industries, Temkin Group measured the NPS of 342 companies across 20 industries based on a survey of 10,000 U.S. consumers. Here are the highlights from this benchmark:

  • With an NPS of 65, USAA’s banking business earned the highest score in the study, followed closely by its insurance business and Navy Federal Credit Union.
  • Spectrum and Consolidated Edison of NY received the two lowest NPS, with scores of -16 and -12 respectively.
  • The industry average for NPS ranged from a high of 39 for auto dealers and streaming media down to a low of 0 for TV/Internet service providers.
  • USAA’s and Navy Federal Credit Union’s scores both outpaced the banking industry average by more than 40 points, while Motel 6’s and Super 8’s scores both fell nearly 30 points behind the hotel industry average.
  • Only five industries saw their average NPS increase over the past year. Of those, airlines’ and utilities’ scores increased the most, going up three points each.
  • Although a majority (54%) of companies’ NPS declined over the previous year, three companies – BCBS of Florida, Fairfield Inn, and Ameren Illinois Company – actually increased their NPS by more than 20 points since 2017.
  • 18- to 24-year-old consumers give companies the lowest NPS, with an average score of 3 across all industries. Meanwhile, two age groups – consumers between the ages of 25 and 34 and those who are older than 74 – tied for giving the highest NPS, with an average score of 36 across industries.
  • NPS is highly correlated with customer experience. On average, customer experience leaders enjoy an NPS that is 21 points higher than the NPS of customer experience laggards.

See the NPS Benchmark Studies from 2012, 2013201420152016, and 2017.

Here’s a list of companies included in this study (.pdf).

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Here are the top and bottom 10 companies:

Here are the NPS scores across 20 industries:
Temkin Group Net Promoter Score (NPS) Benchmark Industry Scores

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Report Outline:

  • USAA and Navy Federal Credit Union Earn Top NPS Across 342 Companies
    • USAA and Navy Federal Credit Union Earn Top Spots in NPS Rankings
    • NPS Increases With Age
  • Want Higher NPS? Improve Customer Experience

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Temkin Group Measured Net Promoter Scores For 342 Companies Across 20 Industries
  2. Net Promoter Scores (NPS): Top and Bottom 20 Companies
  3. Range of Net Promoter Scores (NPS) Across Industries
  4. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 1)
  5. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 2)
  6. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 3)
  7. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 4)
  8. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 5)
  9. Promoters, Passives, and Detractors By Industry
  10. Net Promoter Scores (NPS): Most Above and Below Industry Average
  11. Industry Average NPS, 2016 to 2018
  12. Net Promoter Scores (NPS): Largest Gains and Losses Between 2017 and 2018
  13. Net Promoter Score (NPS) by Age by Industry
  14. Customer Experience Correlates To Net Promoter Scores (NPS)

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Check out this sample of the dataset
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If you’re looking to create a strong NPS program, check out our VoC/NPS Resource Page.

P.S. Net Promoter Score, Net Promoter, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Satmetrix Systems, and Fred Reichheld.

What is Net Promoter Score? (Video)

Net Promoter® Score (NPS®) is one of the most popular CX metrics, so we are often asked to discuss it with clients. In addition to helping build successful NPS systems, we often provide a basic overview for executive teams and broader audiences of employees. That’s why created this video. It’s meant to explain what NPS is all about and why it may be a valuable approach for some companies. It’s a great video to share across your organization if you are using or considering using NPS. If you’d like more information, check out our NPS/VoC program resources.


CX Sparks: Guides For Stimulating Customer Experience DiscussionsThis video is a great introduction to a discussion with your team. That’s why we’ve created a CX Sparks guide that you can download and use to lead a stimulating discussion.


Video Script:

You may have heard of Net Promoter Score, which is often referred to as NPS. It’s a popular customer experience metric. Let’s examine what it is.

Walt Disney once said “Do what you do so well that they want to see it again and bring their friends.” He understood the incredible value of customers who actively recommend a company.

NPS is a measurement system that helps companies track and increase the likelihood of customers recommending an organization.

First of all, let’s describe the actual NPS measurement. It begins by asking customers a simple question:

“How likely are you to recommend this company to a friend or relative?”

Customers choose a response from an 11-point scale that goes from 0 “not at all likely” to 10 “extremely likely.”

Based on their response, customers are placed into one of three categories:

  • If they choose between 0 and 6, then they are DETRACTORS.
  • If they choose 7 or 8, then they are PASSIVES.
  • If they choose 9 or 10, then they are PROMOTERS.

NPS is calculated by taking the percentage of Promoters and subtracting the percentage of Detractors. You then multiply the percentage by 100 to get a whole number between -100 and +100.

Calculating Net Promoter Score (NPS)

Let’s say that 100 people answered the question, and 40 are Promoters, 50 are Passives, and 10 are Detractors. To calculate NPS, we would take the 40% for Promoters, subtract the 10% for Detractors, which leaves 30%. After multiplying it by 100, the NPS is 30.

While NPS provides a score, 30 in this case, the power of the system does not come from overly focusing on the number.

The goal of using NPS is to find and correct issues that create Detractors and to find and repeat activities that create Promoters. So it is important to understand what is causing customers to choose their responses.

That’s why most NPS programs include a follow-up question that asks the customer why they chose the score that they did. This question should be open-ended, not multiple choice, so customers can express their views in their own words.

What do you do with the data?

First of all, you want to “close the loop” with the customers who responded. This means contacting at least some of the customers who respond. Companies often try to reach out to all of the Detractors, to find out more about their problems and to see if their issues can be resolved. They also often contact Promoters, to thank them and hear more about what they like.

Next, you want to examine the opportunities to improve NPS by looking at what situations and activities cause Promoters and Detractors. This requires analyzing the responses from each group separately, and often involves incorporating other information about customers. You may also want to examine what drives Promoters and Detractors across different business areas or customer segments.

There’s no value in identifying the items that are driving NPS up or down unless a company does something with what they learn.

That’s why companies establish processes for reviewing, prioritizing, and taking action on the items that they uncover. In other words, the way to improve NPS is to have an ongoing approach for improving customer experience.

When used correctly, NPS helps companies follow Disney’s advice and do what they do so well that their customers want to see them again and bring their friends.

If being customer-centric matters to your organization, then why leave it to chance? Contact Temkin Group, the customer experience experts, by emailing info@temkingroup.com, or visit our website, at TemkinGroup.com.

Note: Net Promoter, Net Promoter Score, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Inc., Fred Reichheld and Satmetrix Systems, Inc.

Report: The Customer Journeys That Matter The Most

Few organizations deliver outstanding experiences to their customers. In fact, only 6% of companies earned an “excellent” score in the 2018 Temkin Experience Ratings. To better understand which types of interactions are most likely to affect the customer’s perception of an organization, we asked customers to identify the most problematic journeys across 19 different industries. In this report, we:

  • Examine feedback from 10,000 U.S. consumers about their journeys with 318 companies across 19 industries.
  • Identify which customer journeys consumers think most need improvement and look at how those responses differ across age groups.
  • Evaluate how different customer journeys impact five loyalty behaviors: likelihood to recommend the company, likelihood to repurchase from the company, likelihood to forgive the company if it makes a mistake, likelihood to trust the company, and likelihood of trying new offerings from the company.
  • One of the key findings across industries is that journeys that touch customer service are often the most prevalent and the most impactful on customer loyalty.

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Here’s the first figure in the report, which has a total of 58 figures (three detailed graphics for each of the industries):

Most Problematic Customer Journeys Across Industries

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Report Outline:

  • Why Focus On Customer Journeys?
  • Examining Customer Journeys Across 19 Industries
    • Banking Customer Journeys
    • Computers & Tablets Customer Journeys
    • Insurance Customer Journeys
    • Investment Customer Journeys
    • Credit Card Customer Journeys
    • Health Plan Customer Journeys
    • TV & Internet Service Customer Journeys
    • Parcel Delivery Customer Journeys
    • Wireless Carriers Customer Journeys
    • Airline Customer Journeys
    • Hotels & Rooms Customer Journeys
    • Retail Customer Journeys
    • Fast Food Chains Customer Journeys
    • Rental Car Customer Journeys
    • Supermarket Customer Journeys
    • TV & Appliance Customer Journeys
    • Auto Dealers Customer Journeys
    • Software Customer Journeys
    • Utility Customer Journeys

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Most Problematic Customer Journeys Across Industries
  2. Banking: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  3. Banking: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  4. Banking: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  5. Computers & Tablets: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  6. Computers & Tablets: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  7. Computers & Tablets: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  8. Insurance: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  9. Insurance: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  10. Insurance: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  11. Investments: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  12. Investments: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  13. Investments: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  14. Credit Cards: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  15. Credit Cards: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  16. Credit Cards: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  17. Health Plans: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  18. Health Plans: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  19. Health Plans: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  20. TV & Internet Service: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  21. TV & Internet Service: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  22. TV & Internet Service: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  23. Parcel Delivery: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  24. Parcel Delivery: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  25. Parcel Delivery: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  26. Wireless Carriers: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  27. Wireless Carriers: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  28. Wireless Carriers: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  29. Airlines: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  30. Airlines: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  31. Airlines: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  32. Hotels & Rooms: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  33. Hotels & Rooms: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  34. Hotels & Rooms: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  35. Retailers: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  36. Retailers: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  37. Retailers: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  38. Fast Food: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  39. Fast Food: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  40. Fast Food: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  41. Rental Cars & Transport: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  42. Rental Cars & Transport: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  43. Rental Cars & Transport: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  44. Supermarkets: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  45. Supermarkets: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  46. Supermarkets: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  47. TVs & Appliances: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  48. TVs & Appliances: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  49. TVs & Appliances: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  50. Auto Dealers: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  51. Auto Dealers: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  52. Auto Dealers: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  53. Software Firms: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  54. Software Firms: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  55. Software Firms: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups
  56. Utilities: Severity of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  57. Utilities: Loyalty Impact of Problems Across Customer Journeys
  58. Utilities: Problematic Customer Journeys Across Age Groups

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Report: What Happens After a Good or Bad Experience, 2018

To understand how the quality of a customer’s experience – whether it was good or bad – affects their behavior, we asked 10,000 U.S. consumers about their recent interactions with more than 300 companies across 20 industries. We then compared results with similar studies we’ve conducted over the previous seven years.

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Here are some highlights:

  • Purchase and download Temkin Group report: What Happens After a Good or Bad Experience, 2018About 18% of the customers who interacted with TV & Internet service providers reported having a bad experience – a considerably higher percentage than in other industries. Of the companies we evaluated, 21st Century, Comcast, Cox Communications, and New York Life deliver bad experiences most frequently.
  • We created a Sales at Risk Index for all 20 industries by combining the percentage of customers in an industry who reported having a bad experience with the percentage who said they decreased their spending after a bad experience. According to this Index, TV & Internet service providers stand to lose the most revenue (6.4%) from delivering bad experiences, while utilities stand to lose the least (1.4%).
  • When it comes to recovering from delivering a bad experience, Investment firms are the most effective and TV & Internet service providers are the least effective.
  • After customers have a very bad or very good experience with a company, they are more likely to give feedback directly to the company than they are to post about it on Facebook, Twitter, or third party rating sites. Customers are also more likely to share positive feedback through online surveys and share negative feedback through emails.
  • Compared to previous years, customers are less likely to share feedback across almost all channels, with a particularly large drop in the percentage who post on Facebook or Twitter.
  • Across almost all age groups, consumers are most likely to share their feedback directly with the company. Consumers between 18 and 34 years old are the most likely to share their good and bad experiences on Facebook, while older consumers tend to use 3rd party ratings sites more than Facebook or Twitter.

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Here is one of the 12 graphics in the report:


Report Outline:

  • Bad Experiences are Prevalent in the TV & Internet Services Sector
  • Bad Experiences Can Be Very Costly
  • Consumers Give More Feedback After a Bad Experience
    • The Channels for Direct Company Feedback
    • Feedback Differs Across Age Groups

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. TV & Internet Service Providers Deliver the Highest Percentage of Bad Experiences
  2. Companies That Deliver The Most And The Fewest Bad Experiences
  3. How Consumers Cut Their Spending After A Bad Experience, By Industry
  4. How Consumers Cut Their Spending After A Bad Experience, By Industry
  5. Sales at Risk Due to Bad Experiences
  6. How Industries Respond to Bad Experiences Overall
  7. How Consumers Give Feedback
  8. How Consumers Give Feedback to Companies
  9. Changes in How Consumers Give Feedback After a VERY GOOD Experience, 2013 to 2017
  10. Changes in How Consumers Give Feedback After a VERY BAD Experience, 2013 to 2017
  11. How Consumers Across Age Groups Give Feedback After VERY GOOD and VERY BAD Experiences
  12. How Consumers Across Age Groups Give Feedback Directly to Companies After VERY GOOD and VERY BAD Experiences

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Mastering Customer Experience Metrics (Infographic)

As an organization’s customer experience efforts mature, CX metrics become a critical guidepost for all of its activities. You can see different ways to download this infographic below.

Mastering Customer Experience (CX) Metrics Infographic

Here are links to download different versions of the infographic:

Here are links to the research referenced in the infographic:

Report: Lessons in CX Excellence, 2018

Download Temkin Group research report, Lessons in Customer Experience Excellence, 2018We just published a Temkin Group report, Lessons in CX Excellence, 2018. The report provides insights from six winners in the Temkin Group’s 2017 CX Excellence Awards. The report, which has more than 70 pages of content, includes an appendix with the finalists’ nomination forms. This report has rich insights about both B2B and B2C customer experience.

Here’s the executive summary:

This past November, we named six organizations the winners of Temkin Group’s 2017 Customer Experience Excellence Award – AARP, Allianz Worldwide Partners, Century Support Services, Nurse Next Door Home Care Services, Reliant, and Sage. This report:

  • Highlights specific examples of how these companies’ customer experience (CX) efforts have created value for both their customers and for their businesses.
  • Describes winners’ best practices across the four customer experience competencies: purposeful leadership, compelling brand values, employee engagement, and customer connectedness.
  • Includes all of the winners’ detailed nomination forms to help you collect examples and ideas to apply to your own CX efforts.

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Here are some highlights from the winners: Read More …

Report: The State of CX Metrics, 2017

Purchase and download report: State of Customer Experience (CX) MetricsWe published a Temkin Group report, The State of CX Metrics, 2017.

Temkin Group surveyed 169 companies to learn about how they use customer experience (CX) metrics and then compared their answers with similar studies we’ve conducted annually since 2011. We also had them complete our CX Metrics Program Assessment that evaluates the degree to which these efforts are Consistent, Impactful, Integrated, and Continuous.

Here are some of the highlights:

  • Only 11% of CX metrics programs received “strong” or “very strong” ratings, while 64% of companies received “weak” or “very weak” ratings. Only one out of five companies earned at least a moderate rating for being Integrated.
  • Sixty-five percent of companies are good at collecting and calculating metrics, but less than 20% are good at using analytics to predict future changes in the CX metric.
  • Satisfaction and likelihood to recommend remain the most popular CX metrics, with satisfaction at a transactional level delivering the most positive impact.
  • Only 10% of companies always or almost always make explicit tradeoffs between CX metrics and financial results.
  • Companies identified the lack of taking action based on CX metrics as a top obstacle to their programs. The identification of this as a top problem increased the most between 2016 (54%) and 2017 (62%).
  • We asked companies about their effectiveness at measuring 19 different elements of customer experience. They are most effective at measuring customer service, phone interactions, and customers who are using their products and services. They are least effective at measuring the experiences of prospects, customers who have defected, and multi-channel interactions.
  • When we compared companies with stronger CX metrics programs with those with weaker efforts, we found that the stronger firms have better overall CX results, more frequently use and get value from likelihood to recommend metrics, and report fewer obstacles.

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Here are the results from Temkin Group’s CX Metrics Program Assessment:

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Report Outline:

  • How Companies Are Using CX Metrics
    • Effectiveness of Measuring Different Customer Experiences
  • Competency & Maturity of CX Metrics Programs
    • Temkin Group’s CX Metrics Competency and Maturity Assessment
  • Examining Stronger CX Metrics Programs
  • Assess and Improve Your CX Metrics Programs
    • Build A Strong CX Metrics Program in Five Steps

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Effectiveness of Components of CX Metrics Programs
  2. Effectiveness of Components of CX Metrics Programs (2015 to 2017)
  3. Use of CX Metrics (2015 to 2017)
  4. Effectiveness of Components of CX Metrics Programs
  5. Effectiveness of Components of CX Metrics Programs (2015 to 2017)
  6. Elements of CX Metrics Programs
  7. Elements of CX Metrics Programs (2015 to 2017)
  8. Problems With CX Metrics Programs (2015 to 2017)
  9. CX Measurement Across The Customer Lifecycle
  10. CX Measurement Across Different Types of Customers
  11. CX Measurement Across Different Types of Customers
  12. CX Measurement Across Different Elements of Experience
  13. CX Measurement Across Different Elements of Experience
  14. Temkin Group’s CX Metrics Program Assessment
  15. Results From Temkin Group Assessment of CX Metrics Programs
  16. Comparing Strong and Weak CX Metrics Programs: Customer Experience and Business Performance
  17. Comparing Strong and Weak CX Metrics Programs: Metrics Tracked
  18. Comparing Strong and Weak CX Metrics Programs: Successful Use of Metrics
  19. Comparing Strong and Weak CX Metrics Programs: Measurement Effectiveness
  20. Comparing Strong and Weak CX Metrics Programs: Obstacles to Success
  21. Percentiles of Results From Temkin Group CX Competency Assessment
  22. Five Steps For Building a Strong CX Metrics Program

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Report: Five Steps For Building A Strong CX Metrics Program

Five steps for building a customer experience metrics programWe published a Temkin Group report, Five Steps For Building A Strong CX Metrics Program.

A robust customer experience (CX) metrics program allows an organization to systematically measure the quality of the experience it delivers to customers and provides insights that help companies spot improvement opportunities, prioritize investments, track CX progress, and unify the organization around a common goal. Despite these benefits, few organizations have actually built a strong metrics program. In this report, we provide a blueprint that organizations can follow to create an actionable CX metrics program. Here are some highlights:

  • Temkin Group has identified five steps an organization must go through to create a strong CX metrics program: 1) Determine a Core CX Metric, 2) Set Achievable Goals, 3) Identify Key Drivers, 4) Establish Key Driver Metrics, and 5) Make the Suite of Metrics Actionable.
  • To illustrate what these steps should look like, we share nearly 30 best practices from companies including Brainshark, Caesars Entertainment, Ciena, Cisco, Horizon BCBSNJ, Oxford Properties, and Wyndham Worldwide.
  • We provide an assessment companies can use to both evaluate the effectiveness of their CX metrics program and identify where to focus improvement efforts.

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Here are the best practices highlighted in the report:

Examples of 5 Steps for An Actionable CX Metrics Program

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Report Outline:

  • Customer Experience Metrics Need a Makeover
  • The Essence of a Strong CX Metrics Program
  • Five Steps for Creating a Strong CX Metrics Program
    • Step #1: Determine a Core CX Metric
    • Step #2: Set Achievable Goals
    • Step #3: Identify Key Drivers
    • Step #4: Establish Key Driver Metrics
    • Step #5: Make the Suite of Metrics Actionable
  • Assess Your CX Metrics Program

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Problems With CX Metrics Programs
  2. Effectiveness of Component of CX Metrics Programs
  3. Best Practices Across Consistent, Impactful, Integrated, & Continuous
  4. Best Practices Across the Five Steps
  5. How to Craft a Strong Core CX Metric
  6. Use of CX Metrics (2014 to 2016)
  7. Ciena’s Approach to Identifying a Core CX Metric
  8. Tools for Identifying Key Drivers
  9. Examples of Company’s Suites of Metrics
  10. Types of Key Driver Metrics
  11. Ciena’s Inside-out/Outside-In CX Scorecard
  12. Example of Oxford Properties Cascading CX Metrics
  13. Dashboard Metrics: Create Operational Metrics
  14. Tailoring Metrics By Audience: Wyndham Worldwide
  15. Tying Compensation to CX Metrics
  16. Examples of Companies’ Compensation Programs
  17. Temkin Group’s CX Metrics Program Assessment

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Net Promoter Score: Fact and Fiction

It seems like every year I get a surge of questions about Net Promoter® Score (e.g., NPS®). Well, it’s that time of year.

Rather than re-writing my answers, I decided to share a webinar that I recorded a few years ago. Much of that data has been updated, but the content remains totally applicable. This is a great primer on NPS. Enjoy!

You should also check out Temkin Group’s VoC/NPS Resource Page for current data and more advice on how to use NPS. In particular, read My Latest 9 Recommendations For NPS.

Note: Net Promoter, Net Promoter Score® and NPS® are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Inc., Fred Reichheld and Satmetrix Systems, Inc

Report: Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2017

Net Promoter score benchmark study, 2017We published a Temkin Group report, Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2017. This is the sixth year of this study that includes Net Promoter® Scores (NPS®) on 299 companies across 20 industries based on a study of 10,000 U.S. consumers.

Here’s the executive summary:

Many large companies use Net Promoter® Score (NPS) to evaluate their customers’ loyalty. To compare scores across organizations and industries, Temkin Group measured the NPS of almost 300 companies across 20 industries based on a survey of 10,000 U.S. consumers. Here are the highlights from this benchmark:

  • With an NPS of 66, USAA’s insurance business earned the highest score in the study for the fifth year in a row.
  • Comcast received the lowest NPS for the third year in a row with a score of -9.
  • The industry average for NPS ranged from a high of 43 for auto dealers down to a low of 9 for TV & Internet service providers.
  • Citibank, whose NPS lagged 35 points behind the banking average, fell the farthest behind its peers.
  • All industries saw their average NPS decline over the past year, though Utilities dropped the most.
  • 18- to 24-year-old consumers give companies the lowest NPS (with an average score of 17 across industries), while consumers 65 and older give the highest NPS (with an average score of 38 across industries).
  • NPS is highly correlated with customer experience. On average, customer experience leaders enjoy an NPS over 18 points higher than customer experience laggards.

See the NPS Benchmark Studies from 2012, 201320142015, and 2016.

Here’s a list of companies included in this study (.pdf).

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Here are the NPS scores across 20 industries:
range of net promoter scores across industries

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Report Outline:

  • USAA and JetBlue Lead the NPS Benchmark of 299 U.S. Companies
    • USAA and JetBlue Earn Top Spots in NPS Rankings
    • NPS Increases With Age
  • Want Higher NPS? Improve Customer Experience

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Temkin Group Measured Net Promoter Scores For 299 Companies Across 20 Industries
  2. Net Promoter Scores (NPS): Top and Bottom 20 Companies
  3. Range of Net Promoter Scores (NPS) Across Industries
  4. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 1)
  5. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 2)
  6. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 3)
  7. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 4)
  8. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 5)
  9. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) By Industry (Page 6)
  10. Promoters, Passives, and Detractors By Industry
  11. Net Promoter Scores (NPS): Most Above and Below Industry Average
  12. Industry Average NPS, 2015 to 2017
  13. Net Promoter Score (NPS) by Age by Industry
  14. Customer Experience Correlates To Net Promoter Scores (NPS)

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If you want to know what data is included in this report and dataset, download this sample Excel dataset file.download Net promoter score study data sets

If you’re looking to create a strong NPS program, check out our VoC/NPS Resource Page.

P.S. Net Promoter Score, Net Promoter, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Satmetrix Systems, and Fred Reichheld.

Report: Tech Vendor NPS Benchmark, 2017 (B2B)

tech vendor NPS benchmark studyWe just published a Temkin Group report, Tech Vendor NPS Benchmark, 2017. The research examines Net Promoter Scores® (NPS®) and the link to loyalty for 58 tech vendors based on feedback from 800 IT decision makers in large North American organizations. We also compared overall results to our benchmarks from the previous five years. Here’s the executive summary:

For the sixth year in a row, we looked at the correlation between NPS and loyalty for technology vendors. To examine this link, we surveyed 800 IT decision-makers from large North American firms, asking about their relationships with their technology providers. Through this research, we found that:

  • Across the 58 tech vendors we examined, NPS ranged from +43 to -22.
  • Microsoft, SAS, Google, and VMware earned the highest NPS, while Accenture consulting, ACS, Autodesk, and Fujitsu received the lowest.
  • Overall, the average NPS for the tech vendor industry decreased by more than eight points from last year, down from 29.9 to 21.4 – the lowest level of any year we’ve studied.
  • Our analysis shows that NPS is correlated to customers’ willingness to spend more with tech vendors, try their new products and services, forgive them after a bad experience, and act as a reference for them with prospective clients.
  • When it comes to loyalty, IT decision-makers are most likely to purchase more from Microsoft and HP, try new offerings from Microsoft and Google, forgive SAS and Microsoft if they make a mistake, and act as a reference for Apple and IBM SPSS.

The report includes graphics with data for NPS, likelihood to repurchase, Temkin Forgiveness Ratings, and Temkin Innovation Equity Quotient (likely to try new offerings).. The excel spreadsheet includes this data (in more detail) for the 58 companies as well as summary data for other tech vendors with less than 40 pieces of feedback. It also includes the summary NPS scores from 2016.

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Purchase includes Excel spreadsheet with data.
Download sample spreadsheet to see details. 
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As you can see in the chart below, the NPS ranges from a high of 43 for Microsoft servers down to  a low of -22 for Fujitsu.the Net promoter score of 58 tech vendors

The industry average NPS decreased from 29.9 last year to 21.4 this year this year.

the average net promoter score for tech vendors

Report details: The report includes graphics with data for NPS, likelihood to repurchase, Temkin Forgiveness Ratings, and Temkin Innovation Equity Quotient (likely to try new offerings). The excel spreadsheet includes this data (in more detail) for the 58 companies as well as summary data for other tech vendors with less than 40 pieces of feedback. It also includes the summary NPS scores from 2016.

Download report for $695
Purchase includes Excel spreadsheet with data.
Download sample spreadsheet to see details. 
download net promoter score for tech vendors report


Report Outline:

  • Net Promoter Scores for 58 Tech Vendors
    • Microsoft, SAS, Google, and VMware Earn Top Net Promoter Scores
    • Net Promoter Score Correlates to Multiple Aspects of Loyalty

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. Net Promoter Scores (NPS) of 58 Tech Vendors
  2. Average NPS for Tech Vendors, 2012 to 2017
  3. Likely to Repurchase for Tech Vendors
  4. NPS Versus Likely to Repurchase
  5. Temkin Innovation Equity Quotient (TIEQ) of Tech Vendors
  6. NPS Versus Temkin Innovation Equity Quotient
  7. Temkin Forgiveness Ratings(TFR) of Tech Vendors
  8. NPS Versus Temkin Forgiveness Ratings
  9. Willing to Be A Reference For Tech Vendors
  10. NPS Versus Willingness To Act As A Reference

Download report for $695
Purchase includes Excel spreadsheet with data.
Download sample spreadsheet to see details. 
download net promoter score for tech vendors report

 

Note: See our 2016 NPS benchmark2015 NPS benchmark2014 NPS benchmark2013 NPS benchmark and 2012 NPS benchmark for tech vendors as well as our page full of NPS resources.

P.S. Net Promoter Score, Net Promoter, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Satmetrix Systems, and Fred Reichheld.

La Quinta “Gaming” Highlights Flaws in NPS

I’m in Las Vegas to watch some NBA Summer League games (Go Celtics!), and am staying overnight at a La Quinta near the airport. I found this note on the table next to the bed.

While there’s no problem with a nice thank you note, one section caught my eye…

*********
You may be receiving a guest satisfaction survey from La Quinta in the near future and we hope you feel confident that you may answer the question “Would you recommend us to your family and friends” with a 10.

If you should be surveyed, La Quinta uses a 1-10 scale (10 being the best). Although the scale ranking is from 1 to 10, scores of 8 or below results in a negative impact on the overall rating for this hotel.
*********

First of all, this is what I would call “gaming” the system. Anytime you ask for a specific score or range of scores, it’s gaming. Instead of getting a true response from the customer about his/her experience, the customer is forced to balance her honest feedback with a request for a specific score. Some customers are likely to be intimidated, since they may think that the hotel has visibility into their specific response. This would lower response rates and alter true feedback.

The second problem this highlights is the Net Promoter Score (NPS) calculation (since this is clearly an NPS question). As you probably know, NPS segments responses into three categories: Detractors (6 or less), Passives, (7 or 8) and Promoters (9 or 10). Is there really that much difference between an “8” or “9” on this scale? I think people giving either of these ratings would think that they are saying that the experience was good, but not the best that they’ve ever had. The choice of an “8” or “9” may be more driven by an internal rating gauge (that is different in each person), then it is being caused by a distinctive difference in the actual experience.

[Side note: La Quinta’s NPS is 9 points below the hotel industry average in Temkin Group’s latest NPS benchmark study]

The final, more substantial problem is how the metric is being used. My guess is that La Quinta is using NPS to substantially impact the compensation of some hotel employees. This pushes people to focus on “the number” as opposed to what’s really important, the ability to continuously improve.

To be honest, the issues I discuss above are not NPS-specific. I’ve seen them with a variety of metrics, and we work with many companies that are successfully using NPS. So let me share some advice for improving your use of CX metrics….

I wrote a post a few years ago that listed these five rules to stop employees from gaming your feedback system:

  1. Don’t mention or refer to a score
  2. Don’t mention specific survey questions
  3. Don’t mention any consequences
  4. Don’t say or imply that you will see their responses
  5. Don’t intimidate customers in any way

Check out my most about nine recommendations for NPS programs:

  1. The choice of metric is not as important as people think
  2. Driving improvements is what’s critical
  3. Promoters & detractors need their individual attention
  4. Sampling patterns really, really matter
  5. NPS is for relationships, not transactions
  6. NPS is for teams, not individuals
  7. Compensation can be a real problem
  8. Target ranges make more sense than single numbers
  9. There are four loops to close

The bottom line: CX metrics need to focus on improvements, not numbers

Report: What Happens After a Good or Bad Experience, 2017

what happens after a good or bad experience reportWe just published a Temkin Group report, What Happens After a Good or Bad Experience, 2017. This is our annual analysis of which companies deliver the most and least bad experiences, how consumers respond after those experience (in terms of sharing those experiences and changing their purchase behaviors), and the effect of service recovery (see last year’s report).

Here’s the executive summary:

To understand how good and bad experiences effect customer behavior, we asked 10,000 U.S. consumers about their recent interactions with more than 300 companies across 20 industries. We then compared results with similar studies we’ve conducted over the previous six years. Here are some highlights:

  • About 19% of the customers who interacted with Internet service providers and TV service providers reported having a bad experience – a considerably higher percentage than in other industries. Of the companies we evaluated, 21st Century, Spirit Airlines, and HSBC deliver bad experiences most frequently.
  • We looked at the percentage of customers in an industry had a bad experience and combined that number with the percentage of customers who said they decreased their spending after a bad experience and then used this data to create a Sales at Risk Index for all 20 industries. Rental car agencies stand to lose the most revenue (6.7%) from delivering bad experiences, while retailers stand to lose the least (1%).
  • Investment firms are most effective at recovering after a bad experience, whereas TV service providers are the least effective.
  • After customers have a very bad or very good experience with a company, they are more likely to give feedback directly to the company than they are to post about it on Facebook, Twitter, or third party rating sites. Customers are also more likely to share positive feedback through online surveys and share negative feedback through emails.
  • Compared to previous years, customers are more likely to share feedback over Facebook and Twitter, and these channels are most popular with consumers who are between 25- and 44-years-old.
  • Of all the companies we evaluated, The Hartford is the most likely to receive negatively biased feedback directly from its customers, while Chubb is likely to receive the most positively biased feedback.

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Here are excerpted versions of 3 (out of 19) graphics in the report:
Read More …

Customer Experience Leads to Recommendations (Charts For 20 Industries)

If you want customers to recommend your company, make sure they have a good experience. In this post, I share data and analysis showing how customer experience correlates to customer recommendations across 20 industries. At the bottom of this post we’ve assembled a number of industry-specific data charts that you can download and use.

In the report, ROI of Customer Experience, 2016, we provide a lot of data on how customer experience affects a number of different aspects of loyalty for 20 industries. Here’s a summary of some of the data showing the average connection between customer experience and loyalty across all industries.

Here’s how we calculate this data:

  • We ask 10,000 U.S. consumers to identify the companies that they’ve interacted with during the previous 90 days
  • We have those consumers rate their experiences and segment the respondents into five buckets based on their Temkin Experience Ratings feedback
  • For each of the five buckets of consumers, we calculate the average loyalty of the group across different dimensions using the calculations below…

1612_cxandloyaltymetrics

(Note: See Temkin Loyalty Index for data on specific companies)

CX and Recommendations Charts for 20 Industries

If you’re looking for good data for your industry, we’ve put together these 20 industry charts that show the relationship between customer experience and customers making recommendations. Feel free to use them within your presentations in accordance with our citation policy.

Here’s a way to share the data internally…

At [Your Company’s Name], we work hard to improve our Customer Experience, and this industry chart from Temkin Group shows why it’s important and meaningful. As our Customer Experience improves, research shows that consumers are more likely to recommend us, which is one of the many ways in which our customers show their increased loyalty. 

Read More …

CX & Loyalty: A Bad Experience Decreases Spending (Charts For 20 Industries)

Can a single bad experience cost a company money? You bet! As a matter of fact, 53% of consumers reported a cut in spending at fast food restaurants and rental car agencies after they’ve had a very bad experience. Those are the highest levels across the 20 industries we examined. At the bottom of this post we’ve assembled a number of industry-specific data charts that you can download and use.

In the report, What Consumers Do After a Good or Bad Experience, 2016, we analyzed how 10,000 U.S. consumers changed their spending after having a bad experience with hundreds of companies.

1612_afterbad_20industryaverage

On average across all industries, 10% of consumers have had a very bad experience in the previous six months. After that experience, 37% of consumers cut back on their spending. As a result, 3,7% of revenues are at risk after a very bad experience (10% x 37%). This at-risk revenue ranges from a high of 6.5% for rental cars down to a low of 1.6% for supermarkets and retailers.

Bad Experience And Spending Change Charts for 20 Industries

If you’re looking for good data for your industry, we’ve put together these 20 industry charts. Feel free to use them within your presentations in accordance with our citation policy.

For example, here’s some draft copy you might use, together with your industry’s chart, in your company’s internal or external blog:

At [Your Company’s Name], we work hard to improve our Customer Experience, and this industry chart from Temkin Group shows why even one bad experience can cost us lost sales.

Read More …