Report: 2017 Temkin Experience Ratings (U.S.)

1703_temkinexperienceratingsus_coverTemkin Ratings websiteWe published the 2017 Temkin Experience Ratings, the seventh annual release of this comprehensive customer experience benchmark. Here’s the executive summary:

2017 is the seventh straight year that we’ve published the Temkin Experience Ratings, a cross-industry, open standard benchmark of customer experience. To generate these Ratings, we asked 10,000 U.S. consumers to rate their recent interactions with 331 companies across 20 industries and then evaluated their experiences across three dimensions: success, effort, and emotion. Here are some highlights from this benchmark:

  • Publix, Chick-fil-A, and H-E-B earned the highest overall ratings, while Health Net, Blue Shield of CA, and Comcast earned the lowest scores.
  • When we compared company ratings with their industry averages, we found that Kaiser Permanente, Georgia Power, Advantage Rent-A-Car, and Regions most outperformed their peers, while Spirit Airlines and Days Inn feel farthest behind their competitors.
  • The Ratings saw its first general decline in 2015 and then dropped considerably in 2016. This year, however, the Ratings significantly increased, with only seven companies’ scores declining. Fujitsu, Volkswagen, Fairfield Inn, Columbia Natural Gas, and Advantage Rent-A-Car improved the most since last year.
  • To improve customer experience, companies need to master four competencies: Purposeful Leadership, Compelling Brand Values, Employee Engagement, and Customer Connectedness.

Industry Changes in the 2017 Temkin Experience Ratings

We used the same methodology for the Temkin Experience Ratings this year that we’ve used for all of the prior years. Every year, the companies in the Temkin Experience Ratings shift a bit, but this year we made some more substantive changes. Specifically, we:

  • Combined TV service and Internet service. While we have historically provided separate ratings for TV service providers and Internet service providers, we decided to combine those categories this year. It turns out that many of the companies are in both categories and many consumers purchase those services as a bundle.
  • Added streaming media. Given the rise of services such as NetFlix and Hulu, we added a new category that focuses on the customer experience of those streaming media companies.
  • Expanded some industries. We enlarged a number of categories to increase the number of relevant companies. We changed the appliance category to TV and appliances to include a larger group of consumer electronics providers. We also included some newer companies into existing categories. We updated rental cars to rental cars & transport so that we could include firms like Uber, and we changed hotels to hotels & rooms to include companies like Airbnb.

Download report for FreeFreeDownloadButton You can also download the dataset in Excel for $395

Have questions? See our FAQs about the Temkin Experience Ratings. We also have snapshots on all 20 industries.

Here’s a recording of a webinar where we discuss the 2017 Temkin Experience Ratings:

The Temkin Experience Ratings are based on evaluating three elements of experience:

  1. Success: How well do experiences meet customers’ needs?
  2. Effort: How easy is it for customers to do what they want to do?
  3. Emotion: How do customers feel about the experiences?

Here are the top and bottom companies in the ratings:1703_2017txrtopbottom

***See how your company can reference these results or
display a badge for top 10% and industry leaders***

Read more of this post

Report: State of the CX Profession, 2017

1702_stateofcx-profession2017_coverWe just published a Temkin Group report, State of the CX Profession, 2017. This is the fifth year that we’ve examined the roles of CX professionals and the third year that we’ve done a compensation study. Here’s the executive summary:

To understand the mindset and roles of customer experience professionals today, we surveyed 237 CX professionals and then compared their responses to similar studies we’ve conducted over the previous five years. We asked them how their CX efforts impacted their organization last year and about their plans for the coming year. This report also includes a compensation study, which is based on the 158 respondents who agreed to participate. Here are some highlights from the research:

  • Eighty-four percent of respondents say that their customer experience efforts have had a positive business impact in 2016.
  • Ninety-nine percent think that customer experience is a great profession to be in, the highest level we’ve seen in the six years we’ve been doing the study.
  • Eighty percent think that customer experience will be more important for their companies in 2017 than it was in 2016, compared to the 3% who think it will be less important.
  • Forty-nine percent expect to see an increase in their customer experience staffing levels this year – a higher percentage than we’ve seen in previous years.
  • Respondents plan to increase their spending most on voice of the customer software and text analytics.
  • Respondents plan to increase their focus most on Web experiences and customer insights and analysis.
  • The total amount of compensation in our study ranges from $93,000 for mid-level individual contributors to $239,000 for CX executives.

1602_DontBuyReportJoinCXPA

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

Here’s some data that combines pieces of two graphic, showing that CX continues to be a great profession….

1702_cxprofessionalssummary

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

The bottom line: The CX profession is thriving.

Report: Engaging A Tethered Workforce

1701_engagingatetheredworkforce_coverWe just published a Temkin Group report, Engaging A Tethered Workforce.  Here’s the executive summary:

Companies across a number of industries create and deliver customer experiences (CX) through a combination of traditional employees and other workers who they do not directly control – such as contractors or employees of channel partners or outsourcing partners. Despite not being directly employed by the company, these other workers – who make up what Temkin Group calls a “tethered workforce” – still play a critical role in delivering experiences that represent the company’s brand. However, tethered workers differ from typical full-time, corporate employees in ways that pose challenges to brands’ efforts to align these workers with their customer experience goals and objectives. In this report, we examine how brands are tapping into these tethered employees. Here are some highlights:

  • Companies must manage three connections: 1) Between themselves and their partners that employ the tethered workers, 2) Between their partners and the tethered employees, and 3) Between themselves and the tethered workers.
  • We share over 30 examples of best practices from across Temkin Group’s Five I’s of Employee Engagement: Inform, Inspire, Instruct, Involve, and Incent.
  • We offer brands a blueprint for engaging tethered workers with key things to think about across the three connections of tethered workforces.

Download report for $195BuyDownload3

Here are the 17 best practices described in the report:

1701_bestpracticesforengagingtetheredworkers

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

Report: Lessons in CX Excellence, 2017

1701_lessonsincxexcellence_coverWe just published a Temkin Group report, Lessons in CX Excellence, 2017. The report provides insights from eight finalists in the Temkin Group’s 2016 CX Excellence Awards. The report, which has 62 pages of content, includes an appendix with the finalists’ nomination forms. This report has rich insights about both B2B and B2C customer experience.

Here’s the executive summary:

This year, we named five organizations the winners of Temkin Group’s 2016 Customer Experience Excellence Award – Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC), Century Support Services, Crowe Horwath, Oxford Properties, and VCA. This report highlights specific examples of how these companies’ customer experience (CX) efforts have created value for both their customers and for their businesses, describes winners’ best practices across the four customer experience competencies: purposeful leadership, compelling brand values, employee engagement, and customer connectedness. it includes all of the winners’ detailed nomination forms to help you collect examples and ideas to apply to your own CX efforts.

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

Here are some highlights from the winners: Read more of this post

Report: The State of CX Metrics, 2016

1612_stateofcxmetrics2016_coverWe published a Temkin Group report, The State of CX Metrics, 2016. This is the sixth year of this study that examines the CX metrics efforts within large companies. Here’s the executive summary:

Temkin Group surveyed 183 companies to learn about how they use customer experience (CX) metrics and then compared their answers with similar studies we’ve conducted every year since 2011. We found that the most commonly used metrics continue to be likelihood-to-recommend and satisfaction, while the most successful metric is transactional interaction satisfaction. Only 10% of companies regularly consider the effect of CX metrics when they make day-to-day decisions. The top two problems companies face are limited visibility of CX metrics and the lack of taking action on metrics. Companies are best at measuring customer service and phone-based experiences and are worst at measuring the experiences of prospects and customers who defect. We also had companies complete Temkin Group’s CX Metrics Program Assessment, which examines four characteristics of a metrics program: consistent (does the company use common CX metrics across the organization?), impactful (do the CX metrics inform important decisions?), integrated (are trade-offs made between CX and financial metrics?), and continuous (do leaders regularly examine the CX metrics?). Only 11% of respondents received at least a “good” overall rating in this assessment, and companies earned the lowest average rating in integrated. Companies with stronger CX metrics programs deliver better customer experience and use more effort and likelihood-to-repurchase metrics.

See the State of CX Metrics studies from 2011, 201220132014, and 2015.

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

Here are the results form our CX Metrics Competency & Maturity Assessment (one of 22 graphics in the report):

1612_cxmetricsmaturity

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

The Customer Experience Shift From Centralized To Federated

In the report, The Federated Customer Experience Model, we discuss the direction that mature CX organizations will eventually go in—distributing CX capabilities across the organization.  It’s built on three components: CX Centers of Excellence, Enterprise CX Coordination, and Distributed CX Skills and Mindset.

1611_federatedcxmodel

Federation is not just a path for customer experience, it’s a common path for successful transformation within large organizations. Here’s why:

  • Changing an organization requires a concerted effort to define the desired end state, and to align the resources and commitment to drive change. This requires a centralized model.
  • Embedding behaviors in an organization requires distributed capabilities and beliefs, which needs to be disbursed and cultivated. This requires a federated model.

The bottom line: Centralized CX success leads to federated sustainability.

Report: State of Voice of the Customer Programs, 2016

1610_stateofvocprograms2016_coverWe published a Temkin Group report, State of Voice of the Customer Programs, 2016. This is the sixth year that we’ve benchmarked the competency & maturity of voice of the customer programs within large organization. Here’s the executive summary:

For the sixth straight year, Temkin Group has benchmarked the competency and maturity levels of voice of the customer (VoC) programs within large organizations. We found that while most companies think that their VoC efforts are successful, less than one-third of companies actually consider themselves good at reviewing implications that cut across the organization. Respondents think that in the future, the most important source of insights will be customer interaction history and the least important source will be multiple-choice questions. And although respondents believe that technology will play an increasingly important role in their VoC efforts, they also cite “integration across systems” as the biggest obstacle to their VoC success, and this concern has only grown in the past year. In addition to asking questions about their VoC program, we also had respondents complete Temkin Group’s VoC Competency and Maturity Assessment, which examines capabilities across what we call the “Six Ds”: Detect, Disseminate, Diagnose, Discuss, Design, and Deploy. Only 16% of companies have reached the two highest levels of VoC maturity, while 43% remain in the bottom two levels. When we compared higher-scoring VoC programs with lower-scoring programs, we found that companies with mature programs are more successful, they focus more on analytics, and they have more full-time staff, more strongly coordinated efforts, and more involved senior executives.

See the State of VoC reports from 2010201120132014, and 2015.

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

Here are the results from Temkin Group’s VoC Competency & Maturity Assessment:

1610_vocmaturity

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

Free eBook: 25 Tips For Tapping Into Customer Emotions

1609_ebook_25emotiontips_finalAs part of our CX Day celebration, we’re giving away this free eBook: 25 Tips For Tapping Into Customer Emotions.

Here’s the executive summary:

Emotions play an essential role in how people form judgments and make decisions. Consequently, a customer’s emotional response to an experience with a company has a significant impact on their loyalty to that company. To help you improve your customer experience, we’ve compiled a list of 25 examples from companies who are tapping into customer emotions, which you can emulate at your own organization.

FreeDownloadButton

The eBook contains 25 tips across four areas: Experience Design, Organizational Personality, Organizational Empathy, and Customer Segmentation.

1610_25emotiontips

The bottom line: Apply these lessons to tap into your customers’ emotions

The Ultimate Customer Experience Infographic, 2016

Once again, Temkin Group is publishing a new infographic as part of our CX Day celebration.

1610_cxmattersinfographic

Take a look at last year’s ultimate CX infographic.

Here are links to download different versions of the infographic:

1610_cxmattersinfographic Infographic: in .jpg format, in .pdf format

1610_cxmattersinfographic_poster 18″ x 24″ poster: in .jpg format, in .pdf format

 

Report: The State of CX Management, 2016

1605_StateOfCXMgt16_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, The State of CX Management, 2016. This is the seventh annual benchmark of CX activities, competencies, and maturity levels.  Here’s the executive summary:

For the seventh straight year, Temkin Group surveyed large companies to evaluate the state of their Customer Experience (CX) management. This year we found an abundance of CX ambition and activity. Most companies have a CX executive leading the charge, a central team coordinating significant CX activities, and a staff of six to 10 full-time CX professionals. Temkin Group has identified four CX core competencies that companies must master if they want to become customer-centric: Purposeful Leadership, Compelling Brand Values, Employee Engagement, and Customer Connectedness. Using Temkin Group’s CX competency and maturity assessment, we found that only 10% of companies have reached the highest two levels of customer experience, and companies are weakest in the Compelling Brand Values competency. We additionally compared CX laggards with CX leaders and discovered that the leaders have stronger financial results, have more senior executives leading the company-wide CX efforts, have more full-time CX employees, use more analytics, and have more support from senior leaders. This report also includes an assessment that companies can use to benchmark their CX efforts and capabilities.

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

Temkin Group’s Customer Experience Maturity Model uses six stages of CX maturity based on the four customer experience core competencies. Here’s what we found when 210 companies completed the assessment:

1606_CXMaturity

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

2016 Temkin Experience Ratings: 20 Industry Snapshots

Temkin Experience Ratings

We released the 2016 Temkin Experience Ratings that ranks the customer experience of 294 companies across 20 industries based on a survey of 10,000 U.S. consumers. Here’s a link to FAQ’s about the Ratings.

As a follow-up, we published blog posts that examine the results for each of the 20 industries. You can see links to all of those industry snapshots below:

1606_TxRIndustries> Airlines
> Auto Dealers
> Banks
> Computers & Tablets
> Credit Card Issuers
> Fast Food Chains
> Health Plans
> Hotels
> Insurance Carriers
> Internet Service Providers
> Investment Firms
> Major Appliances
> Parcel Delivery Services
Rental Car Agencies
> Retailers
> Software Firms
> Supermarkets
> TV Service Providers
> Utilities
> Wireless Carriers

Temkin Ratings websiteYou can see the ratings of all companies on the Temkin Ratings website

Analytics Obstacle to Avoid: Forgetting to Be Relevant

Every day, analysts find a myriad of insights that could provide significant value for their organizations. Unfortunately, many (very possibly most) of them are ignored. What’s getting in the way?

In a recent webinar for Clarabridge, I discussed five customer analytics mistakes to avoid. One of the mistakes is “Forgetting to be relevant.” Rather than trying to replicate my entertaining banter, I put together this figure showing an example of the obstacle… and the opportunity to overcome it.

1604_AnalyticsObstacleRelevancyThe key lesson is described in the graphic:

Analytical findings must be translated into meaningful terms for the people who need to take action on the insights.

And remember…

  • Analytics are meaningless unless they lead to action.
  • You need to translate insights into a language that stakeholders understand.
  • People want to know what’s in it for them.

The bottom line: You may need to focus less on the analytics, and more on the business.

Report: Customer-Infused Process Improvement

1604_CustomerInfusedProcessImprovement_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, Customer-Infused Process Improvement, which provides five strategies for instilling customers’ needs into process improvement methodologies. Here’s the executive summary:

Process improvement and customer experience have traditionally served different roles in a company. However, these two disciplines are starting to intersect as customer experience looks to process improvement to operationalize key customer interactions and process improvement needs customer experience to provide customer-focused insights and continually monitor new processes. Temkin Group proposes that companies bring these two approaches together into Customer-Infused Process Change. This report highlights five strategies critical to driving this new approach: Prioritize Improvements Across Customer Journeys, Embrace Deep Customer Empathy, Involve Customers in Solution Development, Innovate to Meet Latent Needs, and Measure Success with Customer-Focused Metrics. To make process improvement efforts more customer-centric, organizations need to infuse these strategies across all aspects of process improvement.

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

It’s time for process improvement to become more focused on customers. Rather than abandoning existing process improvement methodologies, Temkin Group recommends bringing a customer orientation into your efforts. We call this approach Customer-Infused Process Change (CiPC), which we define as:

Driving improvements based on a deep understanding of customer needs.

The report provides best practices across five strategies of CiPC:

  1. Prioritize Improvements Across Customer Journeys: By understanding customer interactions in the context of their broader journeys, companies can invest in process improvements projects that have the most impact on the customer’s experience.
  2. Embrace Deep Customer Empathy: In order to effect sustainable changes, employees impacted by redesigned processes need to understand why these changes are important to customers.
  3. Involve Customers in Solution Development: Process improvement efforts must have resources available to ensure that ongoing, incremental changes can be made based on this customer input.
  4. Innovate to Meet Latent Needs: Customers can’t always articulate what they want; instead, they often describe a slightly improved version of what they already know.
  5. Measure Success with Customer-Focused Metrics: Companies can’t measure the success of process improvement efforts with internally focused, operational metrics.

1604_CustomerInfusedProcess5Strategies

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

The bottom line: Process improvements need more customer insights.

CX Metrics: Immature, But Improving (Infographic)

Here are some of insights from the report, State of CX Metrics, 2015.

2016TemkinGroupINFOGRAPHIC_CXMetrics

You can download (and print) this infographic in different forms:

Report: What Happens After a Good or Bad Experience, 2016

1603_WhatHappensAfterGoodBadExperiences_COVERWe just published a Temkin Group report, What Happens After a Good or Bad Experience, 2016. This is our annual analysis of which companies deliver the most and least bad experiences, how consumers respond after those experience (in terms of sharing those experiences and changing their purchase behaviors), and the effect of service recovery (see last year’s report).

Here’s the executive summary:

We asked 10,000 U.S. consumers about their recent interactions with 315 companies across 20 industries, and compared results with similar studies over the previous five years. More than 20% of the customers of Internet service providers and TV service providers reported a bad experience, considerably above the rates for any other industry. Air Tran Airways, Time Warner Cable (TV service and Internet service), Comcast (TV service), and HSBC delivered bad experience to at least one-quarter of their customers. At the same time, less than 3% of Michael’s, Advance Auto Parts, Whole Foods, Publix, Subway, Vanguard, Trader Joe’s, and GameStop customers report having bad experiences. We examined the combination of the volume of bad experiences and the resulting revenue impact and created a Revenues at Risk Index for all 20 industries. At the top of the list, TV service providers and rental car agencies stand to lose at least 6.5% of their revenue from bad experiences. Conversely, less than 2% of the revenues for retailers and supermarket chains are at risk. The companies that recovered very poorly after a bad experience lost sales from 63% of their customers, more than 2.5 times as many as companies that recovered very well. Companies that do a very good job at recovering after a bad experience have more customers who increase spending than those who decrease spending. After a very bad or very good experience, consumers are more likely to give feedback directly to the company than they are to post on Facebook, Twitter, or third party rating sites. Regardless of the channel, consumers are more likely to discuss a very bad experience than a very good one. While the way that consumers give feedback has not changed much since last year, the volume of Twitter usage grew for both positive and negative experiences. Piggly Wiggly, US Cellular, Fifth Third, The Hartford, TriCare, and PSE&G face the potential for the most negatively biased feedback from customers.

Download report for $195
BuyDownload3

Here are excerpted versions of 4 (out of 15) graphics in the report: Read more of this post

%d bloggers like this: