Off Topic: Trump, Sports, And Twitter Usage

Yesterday, President Trump tweeted about firing all football players who don’t stand for the National Anthem. From my perspective, his comments were inappropriate and divisive. It’s a shame that the President seems tone deaf on the players’ underlying issues. We should be amplifying the peaceful voices for social justice, not trying to shut them down.

The reactions was swift, as many NFL players, owners, and others tweeted their opinions. I was very happy to see this statement from my home team posted by Robert Kraft, on the Patriots’ twitter feed:

With all of this action on Twitter, I wondered about how many NFL fans actually use Twitter. So I tapped into our benchmark study of 10,000 U.S. consumers and found that only 36% of NFL fans use Twitter at least weekly (on their computers), the lowest level of any group of sports fans.

Announcing the 2017 CX Excellence Awards

Temkin Group Customer Experience Excellence AwardsAre you proud of the work that your organization is doing to deliver great customer experience or to improve its customer experience? If so, consider submitting a nomination for Temkin Group’s 6th annual Customer Experience Excellence Awards.

The award is open to all organizations around the world, whether their customers are consumers, fans, visitors, students, citizens, companies, patients, or any other group.

Nominations are due by October 20th. (Here’s the nomination form)

The awards are based on the following criteria:

  • Transformation. What is your organization doing to master the four customer experience core competencies?
    • Purposeful leadership: Leaders operate consistently with a clear, well-articulated set of values.
    • Compelling brand values: Brand attributes are driving decisions about how you treat customers.
    • Employee engagement: Employees are fully committed to the goals of your organization.
    • Customer connectedness: Customer feedback and insight is integrated throughout your organization.
  • Results. How is the effort creating value for customers and for the company?
  • Sustainability. How well is the company setup for ongoing success?

You can see information about last year’s finalists—including their nomination forms—in the Temkin Group report, Lessons in CX Excellence, 2017.

For more information, visit the 2017 CX Excellence Awards page.

 

Report: Tech Vendor NPS Benchmark, 2017 (B2B)

We just published a Temkin Group report, Tech Vendor NPS Benchmark, 2017. The research examines Net Promoter Scores® (NPS®) and the link to loyalty for 58 tech vendors based on feedback from 800 IT decision makers in large North American organizations. We also compared overall results to our benchmarks from the previous five years. Here’s the executive summary:

For the sixth year in a row, we looked at the correlation between NPS and loyalty for technology vendors. To examine this link, we surveyed 800 IT decision-makers from large North American firms, asking about their relationships with their technology providers. Through this research, we found that:

  • Across the 58 tech vendors we examined, NPS ranged from +43 to -22.
  • Microsoft, SAS, Google, and VMware earned the highest NPS, while Accenture consulting, ACS, Autodesk, and Fujitsu received the lowest.
  • Overall, the average NPS for the tech vendor industry decreased by more than eight points from last year, down from 29.9 to 21.4 – the lowest level of any year we’ve studied.
  • Our analysis shows that NPS is correlated to customers’ willingness to spend more with tech vendors, try their new products and services, forgive them after a bad experience, and act as a reference for them with prospective clients.
  • When it comes to loyalty, IT decision-makers are most likely to purchase more from Microsoft and HP, try new offerings from Microsoft and Google, forgive SAS and Microsoft if they make a mistake, and act as a reference for Apple and IBM SPSS.

The report includes graphics with data for NPS, likelihood to repurchase, Temkin Forgiveness Ratings, and Temkin Innovation Equity Quotient (likely to try new offerings).. The excel spreadsheet includes this data (in more detail) for the 58 companies as well as summary data for other tech vendors with less than 40 pieces of feedback. It also includes the summary NPS scores from 2016.

Download report for $695
Purchase includes Excel spreadsheet with data.
Download sample spreadsheet to see details. 
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As you can see in the chart below, the NPS ranges from a high of 43 for Microsoft servers down to  a low of -22 for Fujitsu.

The industry average NPS decreased from 29.9 last year to 21.4 this year this year.

Report details: The report includes graphics with data for NPS, likelihood to repurchase, Temkin Forgiveness Ratings, and Temkin Innovation Equity Quotient (likely to try new offerings).. The excel spreadsheet includes this data (in more detail) for the 58 companies as well as summary data for other tech vendors with less than 40 pieces of feedback. It also includes the summary NPS scores from 2016.

Download report for $695
Purchase includes Excel spreadsheet with data.
Download sample spreadsheet to see details. 
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Note: See our 2016 NPS benchmark2015 NPS benchmark2014 NPS benchmark2013 NPS benchmark and 2012 NPS benchmark for tech vendors as well as our page full of NPS resources.

P.S. Net Promoter Score, Net Promoter, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Satmetrix Systems, and Fred Reichheld.

Temkin Group’s (Exciting) Plans For CX Day 2017

Last year, Temkin Group had a great time celebrating CX DayThis year, CX Day will be held on October 3rd and we’re planning another exciting celebration.

Temkin Group has labelled 2017 The Year of Purpose for customer experience. As you’ll see below, we’re continuing that theme in our CX Day plans:

The bottom line: Join Temkin Group in celebrating CX Day 2017!

6 Levers For Executive Commitment to CX (Infographic)

In the report Activating Executive Commitment to CX, Temkin Group introduces a blueprint that CX leaders can use to gain and strengthen senior executive commitment. It’s composed of six levers: Create Vision Clarity, Share Compelling Opportunities, Amplify Emotional Empathy, Feed Intrinsic Motivations, Enable First Steps, and Fuel Ongoing Confidence. Here’s an infographic that provides an overview.

You can download the graphic in several formats:

Mattress Mack Stands Up to Harvey With Purpose

First of all, I send my prayers and best wishes to all of the people effected by Hurricane Harvey.

In the wake of Harvey, there are many, many families who will need help and assistance. We’ve donated to the Rebuild Texas Fund, and I hope that you consider giving to one of the many charities that will be supporting the people of Texas.

Mixed in with the vast pain and suffering, were many stories of ordinary people reaching out to help others. One of those people that caught my eye is Jim McIngvale, who’s known around Houston as Mattress Mack. He owns Gallery Furniture, a chain of three furniture stores in the Houston area.

Mattress Mack turned his furniture stores into free shelters, helping 100s of displaced Houstonians. This wasn’t a difficult decision for him, it was just a natural extension of how he sees his business. Here’s what McIngvale said:

Our business philosophy is … we all have a responsibility to the well-being of our community… That’s the central theme of our culture here. We know that if we help these citizens when they’re in need, they will help us.

McIngvale demonstrates the characteristics purposeful leadership. As we’ve said many times, purpose is powerful. A strong sense of purpose inspires us. It energizes, uplifts, and propels us to overcome obstacles. And purpose connects us together around a shared goal.

Think about these questions:

  • Would you want to work for Gallery Furniture?
  • If you worked at Gallery Furniture, how empowered would you feel to do something good for a customer?
  • Would you go out of your way to shop at Gallery Furniture?

My guess is that there are a lot of “yeses.”

The bottom line: Purpose can lead us through any storm.

Purposeful People Are More Loyal Customers and Employees

Temkin Group has labelled 2017 The Year of Purpose, so we have been examining the topic of purpose across many different angles.

One of the areas we are interested in is the impact that a person’s level of purpose and meaning has on how they behave as an employee and customer. It turns out that it has a pretty significant impact in both of these areas.

In our latest U.S. consumer benchmark study, we asked a number of questions about people’s attitudes, employee behaviors, and company loyalty. As you can see in the chart below, people who believe that they lead a purposeful and meaningful life are better employees and more loyal customers.

The bottom line: Purposefulness creates positivity across all aspects of life.

Want Better Employees? Be A Purposeful Leader

As you likely know, one of Temkin Group’s Four CX Core Competencies is Purposeful Leadership. It requires demonstrating 5 P’s of Purposeful Leaders: Persuasive, Passionate, Propelling, Positive, and Persistent.

Why should leaders bother to adopt these practices?

To answer this question, I took a look at our latest consumer survey and analyzed data from more than 5,000 full-time U.S. employees. As you can see in the chart below, employees who experience the behaviors of purposeful leaders are much more likely to do something that is good for the company even if it’s not expected of them.

This analysis highlights one piece of our dataset that shows how employees work harder for purposeful leaders. We see this same pattern across many other employee behaviors.

Being a purposeful leader is not about being a nice person or a likable manager. It’s about acting in a way that motivates employees and creates a higher performing organization.

The bottom line: Purposeful leaders have more dedicated employees.

Our Nation Needs More Purposeful Leaders

I’m sorry about this somewhat political post (you can stop reading it now if you like), but I feel as though we all have a responsibility to speak up.

I’ve become saddened by the apparent rise of hate across the U.S. Instead of embracing the strength of our diversity, our country seems to be giving rise to hateful rhetoric and policies that target minority groups.

As an American, I believe that this is intolerable. We are a great nation because of our diversity, not in spite of it.

To paraphrase Martin Luther King, Jr., I have a dream that we can live in a society where people are not judged by their religion, race, color, gender, or ethnicity, but by the content of their character.

While I’m not an expert on politics, I’ve spent a lot of time studying leadership. I believe that the leader of a great nation must demonstrate a competency that Temkin Group calls Purposeful Leadership. My hope is that the leaders of our country can better demonstrate these five P’s of purposeful leaders:

  • Persuasive: Don’t just say that we should be doing something, make the case for why it’s good for all citizens and important for the future of the country.
  • Passionate: Don’t motivate people by scaring them, provide a compelling view of the future that inspires hope.
  • Propelling: Don’t focus on your personal needs and ego, empower and enable the people who work for you and around you to be successful.
  • Positive: Don’t focus on finding flaws and blaming people, motivate them by showing appreciation for their successes.
  • Persistent: Don’t adjust your statements to meet the needs of the day, be very clear about your values and always act consistently with them.

The bottom line: The U.S. is a great country because of its inclusive diversity.

How Distributed Are CX Skills Across Organizations?

In previous research, we described how CX organizations will need to evolve towards a Federated CX Model, which is made up of three components shown below.

An important component of this model is the existence of distributed CX skills. To gauge where companies are in this journey, we asked large companies about the degree to which CX skills are distributed across their organizations. As you can see in the chart below:

  • Driving continuous improvement is the most distributed capability (53%)
  • Using text analytics is the least distributed capability (9%)
  • Analyzing and interpreting customer feedback data has the strongest centralized capability (83%)

The bottom line: Companies need to start distributing CX capabilities.

CX Institute eLearning Module Teasers

We recently introduced the CX Institute, which provides online training that creates a customer-centric mindset in employees across an organization. The CX Institute currently offers two eLearning modules, which can be deployed across a company or purchased individually: Customer Experience Foundations and Creating A Customer-Centric Culture.

We just created these teaser videos to provide a sense of what’s in each course…

eLearning Module: Customer Experience Foundations

This interactive online course is meant for just about everyone in your organization, from front-line supervisors to senior executives. It helps people understand what customer experience is, why it’s important, and recognize their personal role in delivering great customer experience.

eLearning Module: Creating A Customer-Centric Culture

This interactive online course is meant for leaders across organizations who are collectively needed to drive change in your culture. The training demystifies culture and provides a framework for creating and sustaining a more customer-centric organization.

The bottom line: Create a customer-centric mindset with CX Institute training!

2017 Temkin Online Ratings (U.S.): USAA, Advantage Rent-A-Car, and Amazon.com On Top

Temkin Group published the 2017 Temkin Online Ratings. Based on a study of 10,000 U.S consumers, the ratings benchmarks the online experience delivered by 282 companies across 20 industries.

USAA took the top two spots for its banking and insurance businesses, and its credit card business tied for 4th. Advantage Rent-A-Car took third place and Amazon.com tied for 4th. Four TV/Internet service providers earned the lowest scores: Comcast, Cox Communications, Spectrum, and Time Warner Cable. Here’s a list of all of the companies.

You can see all of the high-level results on the Temkin Ratings website, or purchase a full dataset.

Purchase dataset for $295+
(see sample spreadsheet)

Purchase dataset for $295+
(see sample spreadsheet)

The Power of Customer Journey Thinking (Infographic)

I hate to break this news to you, but your customers most often interact with your organization because they have to, not because they want to. And when they do connect with you, it’s part of a larger journey that they’re on to achieve something more important than the interaction with you.

That’s why it’s critical for organizations to understand and to design experiences for their customers’ journeys.

A few year ago, we introduced the concept of Customer Journey Thinking (TM). It’s a simple tool for employees across an organization to continuously focus on customers’ journeys. As you can see in the infographic below, it’s all about asking and answering five simple questions.

Customer journey thinking infographic explaining best practices for using customer journey mapping.You can download the infographic in several forms:

Report: Infusing Culture Throughout The New Employee Journey

We just published a Temkin Group report, Infusing Culture Throughout The New Employee Journey.

Here’s the executive summary:

A company’s culture reflects the attitudes and behaviors of its employees and influences almost every aspect of the employee journey and experience. However, despite its importance, many companies fail to orient new employees to their culture during onboarding. Rather than helping new hires form long-term connections with the organization and its values, companies often use this time to teach new hires about the organization’s processes. Companies instead should use their culture as a focal point during recruiting, hiring, and onboarding and then continue to emphasize it as employees acclimate to their roles. This report:

  • Explores how companies can align new employees with their culture.
  • Describes how companies can infuse culture throughout the four stages of the new hire journey: Establish Cultural Fit, Set Behavioral Expectations, Reinforce Positive Performance, and Prioritize Sustaining Culture.
  • Shares examples of best practices from a number of companies, including Adobe, Crowe Horwath, LexisNexis, Oxford Properties, Touchpoint Support Services, and Safelite Autoglass.
  • Provides a checklist companies can use to execute their culture-focused onboarding program effectively.

Download report for $195+
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Here are the best practices described in the report:

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Five Ways That Organizations Crush Customer Empathy (Video)

Human beings are naturally empathetic, yet that tendency can get crushed when they go to work. Watch and read below…

Did you know that human beings are genetically wired for empathy? Our brains have something called mirror neurons that allow us to virtually feel what someone else is feeling. If you see your friend bump her head, then you are likely to react almost as if it had happened to you.

If people are naturally empathetic, then why aren’t most organizations, which are just collections of people, super empathetic towards their customers?

It turns out that organizations inhibit natural empathy in many ways. Here are five of those empathy inhibitors:

  • Inhibitor 1: Individual Context. People view the world through their own perspectives, so your natural empathy may not match the reaction of a customer who is quite different than you. For instance, a wealthy middle-aged marketing executive in New York City has a very different lens on the world than does an 18-year old from a poor, rural community. Also, employees know a lot more about their company’s products, processes, terminology, and organizational structure. So experiences that make sense to employees can often seem very complicated to customers.
  • Inhibitor 2: Human Bias. Companies often design experiences as if their customers were perfectly rational robots, but human beings aren’t like that. While people sometimes use rational thinking, which relies on logic and reason to make decisions, we more frequently use intuitive thinking, which relies on mental shortcuts and cognitive bias to make decisions. Rather than supporting customers’ unconscious decision rules like preferring to maintain the status quo, companies create experiences that slow down customers’ progress, or even derail them completely.
  • Inhibitor 3: Group Think. It turns out that people who are in close quarters, like a work team, tend to conform to a consistent point of view. Since companies often use different metrics for different groups, employees are encouraged to develop a very myopic view of their team’s responsibilities. As a result, the needs of employees’ teams take up so much head space that they drown out any thoughts about the needs of customers.
  • Inhibitor 4: Corporate Culture. Employees tend to conform to their surroundings. When leaders set expectations for a certain type of behavior, employees will try to meet those expectations – even if doing so hurts customers. When the Wells Fargo CEO set an unsustainable goal for the number of products sold to customers, employees across the organization tried to make it happen – even if it they knew it may not be good for customers.
  • Inhibitor 5: Emotional Illiteracy. Leaders in companies rarely discuss customer emotions. It’s not their fault; most people are uncomfortable discussing emotions in any setting. Within companies, emotions are often viewed as being too “soft” or “squishy” to focus on. This lack of dialogue about emotion keeps organizations from fully understanding and addressing the needs, wants, and desires of their customers.

While these inhibitors can drain the customer empathy out of an organization, they don’t need to. Now that you know what they are you can look for them and suppress their impact.

The bottom line: You need to actively unleash employees’ natural empathy.