My History Of Enterprise Transformation And XM

I’m frequently asked to share my views about the evolution of experience management (XM), so I’ve spoken (and written) about topics such as CX establishing the foundation for XM. For some recent speeches I’ve combined my personal introduction with a broader overview of the evolution of enterprise transformation.

After several requests, I’ve captured the content in this short (5 minute) video. It’s a recount of my professional experience and observations from decades of working with many large enterprises. It’s “based on a true story,” which means it’s not meant to be a comprehensive historical dissertation.

As you’ll see in the video, the world of technology and processes has changed radically in a relatively short period of time (by historical standards). Existing business models, however, haven’t come close to addressing these fundamental shifts:

  • People inside and outside of the company are now connected directly to processes and technology within the company.
  • People used to be viewed as participants in processes and users of technology, but are now being recognized, as they should be, as human beings who are driven by their needs and emotions.
  • Research used to consist of periodic studies that resulted in slides and reports, but companies are seeing the power of more continuous collection of data and wide distribution of insights.

1906_BDTHistoryStory_v3 [Autosaved]

In this environment, XM’s combination of intelligence and humanity across the entire value chain provides a powerful catalyst for change. There’s enormous opportunity for organizations to apply this discipline to realign how they operate—and to focus more intensely on how human-beings think and feel, using continuous insights across a network of digitally connected people inside and outside of the company.

Over the next decade and beyond, XM will be the foundation that organizations use to differentiate themselves by redefining their operating models to deliver more human-centric experiences.

The bottom line: I’m really excited about the future of XM.

P.S. To understand XM, make sure to read the report, Operationalizing XM

Written by 

I'm an experience (XM) management catalyst; helping organizations improve results by engaging the hearts and minds of their employees, customers, and partners. I enjoy researching and speaking about leading-edge XM topics. I lead the Qualtrics XM Institute, which is the world's best job. We're igniting a global community of XM Professionals who are inspired and empowered to radically improve the human experience. To achieve this goal, my team focuses on thought leadership, training, and community building. My work is driven by a set of fundamental beliefs: 1) Everything starts and ends with human beings, so you need to understand how people think, feel, and behave; 2) XM is a discipline that needs to be woven throughout an organization's entire operating fabric; and 3) Building the XM discipline requires a combination of culture, competency, and technology.

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