Report: What Happens After a Good or Bad Experience, 2018

To understand how the quality of a customer’s experience – whether it was good or bad – affects their behavior, we asked 10,000 U.S. consumers about their recent interactions with more than 300 companies across 20 industries. We then compared results with similar studies we’ve conducted over the previous seven years.

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Here are some highlights:

  • Purchase and download Temkin Group report: What Happens After a Good or Bad Experience, 2018About 18% of the customers who interacted with TV & Internet service providers reported having a bad experience – a considerably higher percentage than in other industries. Of the companies we evaluated, 21st Century, Comcast, Cox Communications, and New York Life deliver bad experiences most frequently.
  • We created a Sales at Risk Index for all 20 industries by combining the percentage of customers in an industry who reported having a bad experience with the percentage who said they decreased their spending after a bad experience. According to this Index, TV & Internet service providers stand to lose the most revenue (6.4%) from delivering bad experiences, while utilities stand to lose the least (1.4%).
  • When it comes to recovering from delivering a bad experience, Investment firms are the most effective and TV & Internet service providers are the least effective.
  • After customers have a very bad or very good experience with a company, they are more likely to give feedback directly to the company than they are to post about it on Facebook, Twitter, or third party rating sites. Customers are also more likely to share positive feedback through online surveys and share negative feedback through emails.
  • Compared to previous years, customers are less likely to share feedback across almost all channels, with a particularly large drop in the percentage who post on Facebook or Twitter.
  • Across almost all age groups, consumers are most likely to share their feedback directly with the company. Consumers between 18 and 34 years old are the most likely to share their good and bad experiences on Facebook, while older consumers tend to use 3rd party ratings sites more than Facebook or Twitter.

Download report for $195
Purchase and download Temkin Group report: What Happens After a Good or Bad Experience, 2018

Here is one of the 12 graphics in the report:


Report Outline:

  • Bad Experiences are Prevalent in the TV & Internet Services Sector
  • Bad Experiences Can Be Very Costly
  • Consumers Give More Feedback After a Bad Experience
    • The Channels for Direct Company Feedback
    • Feedback Differs Across Age Groups

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. TV & Internet Service Providers Deliver the Highest Percentage of Bad Experiences
  2. Companies That Deliver The Most And The Fewest Bad Experiences
  3. How Consumers Cut Their Spending After A Bad Experience, By Industry
  4. How Consumers Cut Their Spending After A Bad Experience, By Industry
  5. Sales at Risk Due to Bad Experiences
  6. How Industries Respond to Bad Experiences Overall
  7. How Consumers Give Feedback
  8. How Consumers Give Feedback to Companies
  9. Changes in How Consumers Give Feedback After a VERY GOOD Experience, 2013 to 2017
  10. Changes in How Consumers Give Feedback After a VERY BAD Experience, 2013 to 2017
  11. How Consumers Across Age Groups Give Feedback After VERY GOOD and VERY BAD Experiences
  12. How Consumers Across Age Groups Give Feedback Directly to Companies After VERY GOOD and VERY BAD Experiences

Download report for $195
Purchase and download Temkin Group report: What Happens After a Good or Bad Experience, 2018

Written by 

I am a customer experience transformist, helping large organizations improve business results by changing how they deal with customers. As part of this focus, I examine strategy, culture, interaction design, customer service, branding and leadership practices. I am also a fanatical student of business, so this blog provides an outlet for sharing insights from my ongoing educational journey. Simply put, I am passionate about spotting emerging best practices and helping companies master them. And, as many people know, I love to speak about these topics in almost any forum. My “title” is Managing Partner of the Temkin Group, a customer experience research and consulting firm that helps organizations become more customer-centric. Our goal is simple: accelerate the path to delighting customers. I am also the co-founder and Emeritus Chair of the Customer Experience Professionals Association (CXPA.org), a non-profit organization dedicated to the success of CX professionals.

4 thoughts on “Report: What Happens After a Good or Bad Experience, 2018”

  1. Bruce – this was interesting research! About those people that share negative feedback through an email to the company… can you help me understand that? Who are they contacting via email? How are they finding the email address? Do you have an understanding of what’s behind the desire to email someone rather than provide feedback in another means? I have ideas on what this could be, but hoping your research will help explain it. Thank you for all your thoughts on this.

    1. Michelle: Thanks for your comment/question. In the report, we break down the different ways that consumers give feedback to companies, which includes email. Unfortunately, we don’t know who they are contacting or where they got the email address. I really like your question about why they pick one channel of feedback over another. I don’t have the answer, but think we should examine feedback channel motivation in the future.

  2. Hi Bruce, very interesting graph here. Does this consider NPS platforms/software and, if it does, is that rolled up under ‘directly’ (third one down)? thanks

    1. Ivan, the data in the chart does not examine the type of metric or question (e.g., NPS) or the the type of platform that the company is using.

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