Report: Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2017

We published a Temkin Group report, Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2017. This is the sixth year of this study that includes Net Promoter® Scores (NPS®) on 299 companies across 20 industries based on a study of 10,000 U.S. consumers.

Here’s the executive summary:

Many large companies use Net Promoter® Score (NPS) to evaluate their customers’ loyalty. To compare scores across organizations and industries, Temkin Group measured the NPS of almost 300 companies across 20 industries based on a survey of 10,000 U.S. consumers. Here are the highlights from this benchmark:

  • With an NPS of 66, USAA’s insurance business earned the highest score in the study for the fifth year in a row.
  • Comcast received the lowest NPS for the third year in a row with a score of -9.
  • The industry average for NPS ranged from a high of 43 for auto dealers down to a low of 9 for TV & Internet service providers.
  • Citibank, whose NPS lagged 35 points behind the banking average, fell the farthest behind its peers.
  • All industries saw their average NPS decline over the past year, though Utilities dropped the most.
  • 18- to 24-year-old consumers give companies the lowest NPS (with an average score of 17 across industries), while consumers 65 and older give the highest NPS (with an average score of 38 across industries).
  • NPS is highly correlated with customer experience. On average, customer experience leaders enjoy an NPS over 18 points higher than customer experience laggards.

See the NPS Benchmark Studies from 2012, 201320142015, and 2016.

Here’s a list of companies included in this study (.pdf).

Download report for $495
(includes report (in .pdf) plus dataset in Excel)
Purchase Net Promoter Score (NPS) benchmark

Here are the NPS scores across 20 industries:

Download report for $495
(includes report (in .pdf) plus dataset in Excel)
Net Promoter Score (NPS) Benchmark Study

If you want to know what data is included in this report and dataset, download this sample Excel dataset file.Screen Shot 2014-10-17 at 4.05.17 PM

If you’re looking to create a strong NPS program, check out our VoC/NPS Resource Page.

P.S. Net Promoter Score, Net Promoter, and NPS are registered trademarks of Bain & Company, Satmetrix Systems, and Fred Reichheld.

Written by 

I am a customer experience transformist, helping large organizations improve business results by changing how they deal with customers. As part of this focus, I examine strategy, culture, interaction design, customer service, branding and leadership practices. I am also a fanatical student of business, so this blog provides an outlet for sharing insights from my ongoing educational journey. Simply put, I am passionate about spotting emerging best practices and helping companies master them. And, as many people know, I love to speak about these topics in almost any forum. My “title” is Managing Partner of the Temkin Group, a customer experience research and consulting firm that helps organizations become more customer-centric. Our goal is simple: accelerate the path to delighting customers. I am also the co-founder and Emeritus Chair of the Customer Experience Professionals Association (CXPA.org), a non-profit organization dedicated to the success of CX professionals.

4 thoughts on “Report: Net Promoter Score Benchmark Study, 2017”

  1. Hi Bruce
    I’m always interested in NPS Benchmarks, and in particular my eye is caught my the woeful NPS scores of Comcast and Citibank. In complete contrast to Reichheld’s theory, both these firms are delivering fantastic financial performance in 2017, esp. Comcast – how do you read the difference between their profits and NPS?

    1. Rick, great observation. The link between business performance and NPS performance (along with just about any CX metric) can be severely curtailed when consumers have limited choice. Even if people are unhappy with a company, they can’t always act on their displeasure (see the post: Why CX Does Not Always Drive Loyalty). You can end up with customers who are attitudinally disloyal (as measured by NPS), but behaviorally loyal. This is a latent problem for a company that can emerge as a performance problem if the company sees more competition or tries to expand its product footprint into more competitive environments.

    1. Mercedes-Benz was in the study, but we did not get enough respondents to include it in our published findings. We had 94 consumer responses for M-B, but we require a minimum of 100.

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