Report: Economics of Net Promoter Score, 2017

We just published a Temkin Group report, Economics of Net Promoter Score, 2017. Here’s the executive summary:

Net Promoter® Score (NPS®) is a popular metric that companies use to analyze their customer experience efforts. But how does this metric actually relate to loyalty? To uncover the relationship between NPS and loyalty, we asked 10,000 U.S. consumers to give an NPS to 331 companies across 20 industries, and we then looked at how this score correlated with four key loyalty behaviors. Here are some highlights from this research:

  • Compared to detractors, promoters are over four times more likely to repurchase from a company, over five times more likely to forgive a company if it makes a mistake, over seven times more likely to try new offerings from a company, and almost five times more likely to trust a company.
  • We performed a detailed analysis of the loyalty data for promoters, passives, and detractors across 20 different industries: airlines, auto dealers, banks, computer and tablet makers, credit card issuers, fast food chains, health plans, hotels and rooms, insurance carriers, investment firms, parcel delivery services, rental car and transport agencies, retailers, software firms, streaming media services, supermarkets, TV and Internet service providers, TVs and appliance makers, utilities, and wireless carriers.
  • Ultimately, if a company wants to benefit from using NPS as a key metric, it must focus on improving customer experience, not obsessing over the metric itself.

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Note: To see NPS for individual companies and industries, download the report, Net Promoter Benchmark Study, 2016.

These two graphics from the report show the average connection between NPS and loyalty across all 20 industries, while the report also contains data for each of the 20 industries:

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Report Outline:

  • Promoters are More Loyal than Passives or Detractors
  • Loyalty of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across 20 Industries
    • NPS Loyalty Details for 20 Industries
  • Focus on Customer Experience, Not A Metric

 

Figures in the Report:

  1. NPS Correlates to Future Purchase Intentions
  2. Value of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across Industries
  3. Value of Promoters Versus Detractors
  4. Likelihood of Repurchasing of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across Industries
  5. Likelihood of Trying New Offerings of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across Industries
  6. Likelihood of Forgiving of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across Industries
  7. Likelihood of Trusting of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across Industries
  8. Better Customer Experience Correlates to Higher NPS
  9. Value of Promoters, Passives, and Detractors Across Industries
  10. The Four Customer Experience Core Competencies

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While this report provides clear evidence that promoters are more valuable than detractors, it is not an endorsement of NPS as a metric. The data shows that companies should be able to increase their customer loyalty if they create promoters and cut down on detractors. As you will see on our VoC/NPS Program Resources, the processes for improving is more important than the specific metric being used.

Written by 

I'm an experience (XM) management catalyst; helping organizations improve results by engaging the hearts and minds of their employees, customers, and partners. I enjoy researching and speaking about leading-edge XM topics. I lead the Qualtrics XM Institute, which is the world's best job. We're igniting a global community of XM Professionals who are inspired and empowered to radically improve the human experience. To achieve this goal, my team focuses on thought leadership, training, and community building. My work is driven by a set of fundamental beliefs: 1) Everything starts and ends with human beings, so you need to understand how people think, feel, and behave; 2) XM is a discipline that needs to be woven throughout an organization's entire operating fabric; and 3) Building the XM discipline requires a combination of culture, competency, and technology.

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