The Changing Pattern of Consumer Communications

For the past several years, we’ve been examining how U.S. consumers prefer to communicate with each other, analyzing their answers to the question, Which method would you most likely use to communicate with your friends?

As you can see in the figure below:

  • Text messages are on the rise (+8 points between 2012 and 2016), while home phones (-6 points) and email (-5 points) are on the decline.
  • Cell phones (increases with age) and text messages (decreases with age) are the most variable choice based on age group.
  • Text messages are the preferred channel for all ages below 45 years old.
  • Cell hones are the preferred channel for 45- to 74-year-olds.
  • Home phones are the preferred channel for people who are older than 74.
  • Online chat via Facebook has increased in preference (+4 points since 2012), and is most popular with 25- to 34-year-olds.

1609_preferredcommunications

The bottom line: More proof of a generational communications gap.

Written by 

I am a customer experience transformist, helping large organizations improve business results by changing how they deal with customers. As part of this focus, I examine strategy, culture, interaction design, customer service, branding and leadership practices. I am also a fanatical student of business, so this blog provides an outlet for sharing insights from my ongoing educational journey.

Simply put, I am passionate about spotting emerging best practices and helping companies master them. And, as many people know, I love to speak about these topics in almost any forum.

My “title” is Managing Partner of the Temkin Group, a customer experience research and consulting firm that helps organizations become more customer-centric. Our goal is simple: accelerate the path to delighting customers.

I am also the co-founder and Emeritus Chair of the Customer Experience Professionals Association (CXPA.org), a non-profit organization dedicated to the success of CX professionals.

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