NCAA Provides A Lesson (Not) in Values

In a recent Boston Globe article, Northeastern University’s athletics director Peter Roby reflected on the notion of the NCAA’s “values” given Louisville’s hiring of Bobby Petrino as its football coach. Petrino was fired by Arkansas because of a scandal involving a motorcycle accident and an improper relationship with a female employee.

Here’s an excerpt of Roby’s comments:

“If we’re going to have a conversation about values, then we should understand how those things are lived on a daily basis and what it looks like when you’ve got a set of values that underpin what your activities are… I just didn’t feel like the hiring of someone like Bobby Petrino was consistent with what we say our values are. I wanted people to understand that if we’re going to put values on paper, we better be prepared to defend them and to be held accountable for them.”

My take: Roby is absolutely right, and his comments are applicable to any organization. True values aren’t the things you write down or proclaim in a speech in front of customers, employees, and shareholders, they’re the principles that shape how you make decisions. What you do and don’t do are the only accurate measures of true values. That’s why one of our Six Laws of Customer Experience is “You Can’t Fake it.

Without a clear set of true values, companies lack a “due North” that empowers everyone in the organization to make decisions because they understand what’s important. One of our principles of People-Centric Experience Design is Align with Purpose, an approach that would fail unless organizations have true values.

It’s okay to change your values or aspire to a new set of values, but it’s very hard to live up to them. You need to be very conscious of every decision you make and constantly look in the mirror and ask yourself, is that decision consistent with what I believe my values to be?

The bottom line: True values are defined by actions, not words

Written by 

I am an experience management transformist, helping organizations improve business results by engaging the hearts and minds of their customers, employees, and partners. My "job" is Head of the Qualtrics XM Institute. The Institute is still being established, but our goal is to help organizations around the world thrive by mastering Experience Management (XM). As part of this focus, I examine strategy, culture, interaction design, customer service, branding and leadership practices. And, as many people know, I love to speak about these topics in almost any forum. Prior to joining Qualtrics, I was managing partner of Temkin Group (leading CX research, advisory, and training firm), co-founder and chair of the Customer Experience Professionals Association (CXPA.org), and a VP at Forrester Research. I'm a fanatical student of business, so this blog provides an outlet for sharing insights from my ongoing educational journey. Check out my LinkedIn profile: www.linkedin.com/in/brucetemkin

One thought on “NCAA Provides A Lesson (Not) in Values”

  1. Like you, I completely agree with Roby’s take. What is often shocking and distressing is that the NCAA, like corporations, preach (advertise) values — then make decisions that ignore the values. Perhaps decisions need to be put through a rigorous value-test.

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